OUR 10TH YEAR OF SERVICE
TO THE CITY OF BETHLEHEM, BETHLEHEM AND HANOVER TOWNSHIPS AND THE BOROUGHS OF FOUNTAIN HILL, FREEMANSBURG AND HELLERTOWN

Phone: 610-625-2121 FAX: 610-625-2126 gtaylor@tnonline.com

Thursday, October 27, 2016



October 26, 2016


COVER STORY


In search of Bethlehem’s ghosts


On the he night of Oct. 13, with a full moon overhead, 13 daring souls went out into the crisp autumn evening in search of the supernatural. They were together as part of a Moravian Bookstore Historic Bethlehem Ghost Tour – one of many held weekly in downtown Bethlehem every October. They were doing their hunting in a group with an experienced guide because there is, after all, safety in numbers.


By Carole Gorney


 


NEWS ANALYSIS


Election 2016: The voter fraud myth


Without offering specifics, GOP Presidential nominee Donald Trump has repeatedly insisted that the Nov. 8 election “is going to be rigged.”  On the campaign trail, he has said the only way he can lose Pennsylvania is if there is “cheating,” so “[w]e have to call up law enforcement. And we have to have the sheriffs and the police chiefs and everybody watching.” But as Philadelphia City Commissioner Al Schmidt, himself a Republican, recently said, “The real threat to the integrity of elections ... isn’t voter fraud, though it does rarely occur. The real threat to the integrity of elections is irresponsible accusations …” Photo: Northampton County’s voting machines stand alone, i.e. not connected to the Internet and without any hardware to permit remote access.


By Bernie O’Hare


 


ANOTHER VIEW—LAWN PARKING


Take care of you own house first


At its Oct. 18 meeting, Bethlehem City Council approved an ordinance advanced by the city administration that bans homeowners from parking on their front lawns, except under certain circumstances. The measure is designed to address the aesthetics of parking one’s vehicle on one’s private front lawn.


It appears to be more of a solution in search of a problem.


Since this initiative was announced about a month ago, I have been traveling around the city to try to estimate what percentage of homes have parked cars on their lawns in Bethlehem. I have not found one instance of this taking place, although others who knew what I was doing have mentioned five locations in the city where they’ve noticed this situation. One actually even involves a city employee who was observed parking his city vehicle on his lawn. Photo: Acorn style lights along the city’s Greenway have been missing for over a year due to vandalism. Insert: At the East Sixth Street connection to the Greenway one of two remaining acorn style lights is on its way to becoming another casualty of vandalism.


By Dana Grubb


 


OKTOBERFEST


Dachshund dash


An enthusiastic crowd gathered around the fenced-in area at the Levitt Pavilion Oct. 9 to watch the sixth annual Dachshund Races at SteelStacks during Oktoberfest and to cheer the 40 dogs scheduled to race, as they crossed the finish line. Whether you had a best friend entered or were just there to watch the race, everyone had a good time and the weather couldn’t have been nicer. Photo: This dachshund is determined to get to the finish line no matter what.


By Ruth Grady


 


HALLOWEEN


Scary treats at Sands Outlets


A steady stream of families with mostly costumed children attended the trick-or-treat Halloween party in the Outlets at Sands Oct. 22. The annual free event featured trick-or-treat Halloween sweets and coupons given out by participating store representatives. Games and costume prizes were part of the Halloween party organized by the Outlets at Sands management. Children left the mall with bags of candy and smiles on their painted faces. Trick-or-treat night in the City of Bethlehem is scheduled for Friday, Oct. 28 from 6 to 8 p.m. Bethlehem Township, Freemansburg, Fountain Hill, Hanover Township and Upper Saucon Township are also the same night. Bethlehem’s Halloween parade is Sunday, Oct. 30 at 2 p.m. Photo: Katherine Ortiz, a store employee and Bethlehem resident, hands out candy to trick-or-treaters Noelle Jones and Kristina Folhemus in front of the Outlets at Sands store Hartstrings. The children were with Christina Folhemus from Flemington for their first visit to the Halloween party, with a stop at her mother-in -law’s home in Bethlehem.


By Tim Gilman


 


THE ARTS


Press cartoonist’s work on display


“Signs of Distress” and “Role Models,” two of Ed Courrier’s previously unpublished political cartoons, are on display at RE:find’s Gallery on the Walk (located on the ArtsWalk just off Seventh Street). This exhibition of recent artwork by several area artists complements the “Hues of Red and Blue” juried show held at the Priscilla Payne Hurd Gallery in the Allentown Art Museum. Ed Courrier’s editorial cartoons are published regularly in the Bethlehem Press and other Lehigh Valley Press weeklies. The Gallery on the Walk exhibit continues through Nov. 20. Hours: 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Tuesday - Saturday, noon - 5 p.m. Sunday. Information: 610-841-4866; refindallentown@gmail.com.


 


BETHLEHEM SPORTS


Cane VB team EPC champs


Memories of losing in last year’s East Penn Conference championship were certainly on the minds of Liberty players coming into last Saturday’s championship match against Parkland. The Trojans swept Liberty a year ago for the EPC crown and the Hurricanes returned the favor over the weekend, taking care of business in three straight games (25-11, 25-21, 25-20) to over power Parkland.


By Peter Car


 


LV FOCUS


Spotting the spotted laternfly


The spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) has the potential to destroy high-value crops, including grapes, tree fruits and hardwood lumber. Early detection is vital for the protection of Pennsylvania agriculture and businesses. In an effort to keep the spotted lanternfly from spreading, the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture has quarantined municipalities in the Lehigh Valley and Southeastern Pennsylvania.


From the Penn State Lehigh County Extension Office


 


OTHER STORIES


Bethlehem Area SD: BAVTS proposes major projects


Bethlehem Area SD: District’s anti-hazing policy updated


Bethlehem Area SD: Freedom plans 50th anniversary


Bethlehem: Ordinance prohibits lawn parking


Bethlehem: Taste & Tunes – Good food, good music, good cause


Hanover Township: Supervisors ponder medical marijuana sites


Valley: Bethlehem Press collecting for ‘Stockings for Soldiers’


 


WEEKLY FEATURES


Around town community calendar


Police logs


Area obituaries


Center for Animal Health and Welfare


Volunteers


Student profiles


High school news reports


 


MEET THE PRESS








The Bethlehem Press online


Where to buy the Bethlehem Press


To subscribe: New start


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Tuesday, October 18, 2016


October 19, 2016

COVER STORY-HURRICANE MATTHEW

‘It could have been worse’

What happens when a hurricane interrupts your family vacation? Scott Pagel, sports editor of the Bethlehem, Catasauqua, Northampton, and Whitehall editions of the Lehigh Valley Press, was on vacation with his family Oct. 5-12 at the Disney All-Star Sports Resort in Orlando during  the time Hurricane Matthew was projected to hit Florida before moving up the East Coast.

By Zach Hottinger

 

COMMUNITY

Eating a meal should not be a privilege

A nondescript maintenance building on the Miller Heights ES campus is the new home for Back Pack Pals, a program organized by Bethlehem Area School District parent Nikki Testa that aims to provide food for students in need over long weekends and extended holidays. Testa, who was raised by a single mother, said it was divine guidance that spurred her to pursue establishing the Back Pack Pals program. “I was tagged to pay it forward,” the upbeat wife and mother of two daughters says with a smile. Photo: Vivian Robledo-Shorey, the BASD’s director of student services and minority affairs, outlines the need for some students to receive assistance through the Back Pack Pals program so they do not go hungry when school is not in session.

By Dana Grubb

 

HAWK MOUNTAIN

A women ahead of her time

On Sept. 21, Northampton Community College sponsored the keynote lecture on its 2016 Humanities Theme, “Flying Free: Birds and the Human Spirit.” The subject was Rosalie Edge, the founder of the Hawk Mountain Sanctuary in Kempton, Pa. Hawk Mountain is famous the world over, but Edge has slipped into undeserved obscurity. As the speaker, Dyana Z. Furmansky, made clear, she deserves our attention. Furmansky is the author of a prize-winning book on the topic of her lecture, “Rosalie Edge, Hawk of Mercy: The Activist Who Saved Nature from the Conservationists.” Forceful and abrasive, Edge did not hesitate to step on toes to conserve nature. The treatment she received from the men she challenged, conservationists included, reminded the speaker, and some in the audience too, of the ways strong women in public life are still treated today. Photo: Joined by Rosalie Edge’s granddaughter, Deborah Edge, M.D., Dyana Furmansky displays her award-winning study of the founder of the Hawk Mountain Sanctuary.

By Dorothy and Dennis Glew

 

PEOPLE

Local pilot says ‘Sully’ highly accurate

The movie “Sully” focuses on a trained professional whom circumstances turn into a hero. Chesley Burnett “Sully” Sullenberger III, a commercial pilot, faced a crisis with calm professionalism, saved the lives of those entrusted to him and endured intense unmerited criticism.  After viewing the film, Salisbury Township resident and former pilot Richard Fried gives it a thumbs up and states “[the movie] was very accurate.”  Fried’s assessment is particularly relevant because he and Sully flew slightly different versions of the same plane. Fried piloted the larger Airbus A300; Sully worked on the Airbus A320.

By Beverly Springer



ENTERTAINMENT

Family fun at the Apple Fest

There was something for everyone at the third annual Apple Days Festival at the Burnside Plantation. Among other activities for children were rides on a pony or in a donkey-drawn cart, apple dunking, and having their faces painted. In the Kids Craft Tent young visitors could make a totem pole, a pinecone bird feeder or a paper Burnside model. They could also try their hand at sand art. Older attendees could watch and/or do some square dancing, witness a beekeeper demonstration and participate in a doughnut-eating contest. Yet another competition was the My Favorite Apple Pie Baking Contest in the Culinary Tent. Visitors could get a sense of life long ago by watching colonial crafters demonstrate their skills, sampling colonial apple dishes, or taking in the colonial garb of the volunteers. Proceeds from the event support Historic Bethlehem Museums and Sites. Photo: Anita Gerrity, winner of the apple baking contest, displays her caramel apple cheese cakes.

By Dorothy and Dennis Glew


BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Hawks aim for city title

There is no question which football team is playing the best in District 11 heading into week nine and that’s Bethlehem Catholic. The Hawks appear to be unfazed by anything in this mini demolition course they’ve been able to tread recently and last Friday’s lopsided 40-20 road victory at Whitehall solidified that point.

By Peter Car

 

LV FOCUS

Variations on an ‘Enigma’

e·nig·ma /iˈniɡmə/ nun a person or thing that is mysterious, puzzling, or difficult to understand. This is the word used by Sir Edward Elgar as part of the title for the set of variations that he wrote on a single theme, the “Enigma Variations.” The story goes that Elgar was improvising on his piano and came up with this nice melody that reminded him of his wife, Alice. As he experimented with the music, changing it around, he jokingly called out to his wife in the kitchen, “Who does this sound like?”

By Diane Wittry

 

OTHER STORIES

Valley: It’s official-The flu season has opened

Bethlehem: School board ponders primary Spanish

Bethlehem: Planner move to seize a vacant lot

Northampton County: Council reviews 2017 spending plan

Valley: Walmart begins hunt for seasonal help

Classroom: Freedom’s marching Patriots

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

To advertise: Ad staff

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Tuesday, October 11, 2016


October 12, 2016

COVER STORY

Service honors 4 firefighters

The Bethlehem Fire Department held its annual memorial ceremony Oct. 3 The annual event featured the recognition of recently deceased firefighters including Lt. Charles DiDonato, Assistant Chief Joseph F. Burghardt, Jeffrey Halleman and Robert Steidinger. Local firefighters and paramedics attended the event at the John L. Schweder Engine Company No. 1 along E. Fourth Street, with friends and families of past and present members of the Bethlehem Fire Department. Photo: Bethlehem Fire Department Chief Robert Novatnack, retired Deputy Commissioner Eugene Novak (left), Mayor Bob Donchez and Senator Lisa Boscola lead the Pledge of Allegiance.

By Tim Gilman

 

BETHLEHEM HISTORY

Church celebrates 100th anniversary

The St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Cathedral of Bethlehem celebrates its centennial the weekend of Oct. 28-30 with three events. The celebration includes a Taverna Night, Centennial Ball and Banquet, and an archieratical liturgy followed by a brunch.

By Karen M. Samuels

 

LABOR RELATIONS

Just Born welcomes back, most, not all, workers

A month after they went on strike, hourly employees of Just Born Inc. are back at work. Four hundred of the company’s 600 employees picketed the Stefko Boulevard business day and night for weeks, and then management met the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union Local #6 union leaders at the table Sept. 28. Photo: On the picket line are former Just Born employees with their years employed: Brian Backensto, 10, Beverly Kareyva, 37, Rick Rivera, 12, Shawn Fitzpatrick, 12, Tracy Snyder, 38, and Debra Schlicher, 25.

By Nate Jastrzemski

 

SOUTH BETHLEHEM

‘A Community Conversation’

National Museum of Industrial History (NMIH) President and CEO Amy Hollander sought help and input from the South Bethlehem Historical Society (SBHS), as well as interested members of the general public during her address to SBHS’s annual meeting Sept. 20. It was titled, “Program Development for the NMIH: A Community Conversation.” Photo: NMIH president & CEO Amy Hollander is presented with a framed photo of a Bethlehem Steel blast furnace by SBHS president Jessica Lee and SBHS board chair Maureen Dresen.

By Ed Courrier

 

COMMUNITY

Memories, caps and camaraderie

 The second annual Dave DiGiacinto “DiGi” Golf Tournament took place Sept. 24 at the City of Bethlehem’s golf course, with 60 golfers participating in the scramble style tourney. Friends, family and colleagues of DiGiacinto, the former Bethlehem city councilman and city controller who died suddenly in January 2015 at age 61, reminisced and enjoyed each other’s camaraderie during an afternoon of golf followed by dinner at Roosevelt’s 21st Bar and Grill in Bethlehem. Frank “Tripper” Storey, an event organizer, said funds raised at the 2016 event would bring the two-year total of funds raised to support the Boys and Girls Club of Bethlehem to $9,000. DiGiacinto sat on the club’s board of directors for a number of years. Photo: Wayne Fatabene, Rob Ruyak, Mike Hartenstine and David Collins are joined by Dave DiGiacinto’s sister, Sally Horan, who traveled to Bethlehem from her home in Texas to support the fundraising effort in her brother’s memory.

By Dana Grubb

 

OKTOBERFEST

Lots of beer, food and fun

Wayne Fatabene, Rob Ruyak, Mike Hartenstine and David Collins are joined by Dave DiGiacinto’s sister, Sally Horan, who traveled to Bethlehem from her home in Texas to support the fundraising effort in her brother’s memory. Photo: Lehigh Valley Choral Society members sing on the Yuengling Biergarten stage. Bethlehem resident Donna Janusko, specially dressed for the German festival, was the center of attention.

By Tim Gilman

 

VALLEY

Penn State Day grows in Bethlehem

The third annual Lehigh Valley Penn State Day recently attracted many PSU graduates and other visitors to historic downtown Bethlehem. Bethlehem businesses and local PSU alums joined together to fight pediatric cancer with special sale promotions. The inaugural Blue and White dinner and dance, put on by the Penn State Lehigh Valley Alumni Society for all PS grads, attracted a sizeable first-year crowd to the Hotel Bethlehem Grand Ballroom. PSU staffers and volunteers worked booths and tables along Main Street despite afternoon showers. The local Penn State Alumni Blue Band and the Nittany Lion mascot appeared intermittently in downtown Bethlehem. Photo: Penn State Alumni Blue Band members perform some favorite tunes on Main Street.

By TimGilman

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Bethlehem Catholic dismantles Parkland

It was a game that the Bethlehem Catholic football players, coaches, and fans had circled on their calendars for a while. Even with all of the success in the Eastern Pennsylvania Conference and District 11, the Golden Hawks hadn’t played the four-time district champion Parkland Trojans for a few years. The way that the conference was aligned, it didn’t allow these two powerhouses to meet on the gridiron until the league realigned before the start of the season.

By CJ Hemerly

 

LV FOCUS

Brandford Marsalis headline ‘Gala Opening’

The 2016-17 season-opening Allentown Symphony Orchestra classical music concerts will be long-remembered for a Lehigh Valley world premiere by a well-known musician, band leader and composer. Branford Marsalis and the Allentown Symphony perform Villa-Lobos’ “Fantasia for Saxophone and Orchestra” in an updated transcription of the work. Marsalis headlines the “Opening Gala” for the Allentown Symphony Orchestra ”Classical Series,” 7:30 p.m. Oct. 15 and 3 p.m. Oct. 16, Miller Symphony Hall, Allentown.

By Paul Willistein

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: Witches’ Ball benefits childrens festival

Bethlehem Council: 10$% sewer rate proposed

Bethlehem Twp.: Bordhead Road again a priority

Fountain Hill: Grants, donations benefit borough

Lehigh: Smiley articulates Black frustration

Northampton County: Council to support Boscola gerrymandering bill

Valley: Take family on Open Gate Tour Oct. 16

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

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October 5, 2016

COVER STORY-SEX TRAFFICKING PART 3

'We can’t arrest ourselves out of the problem'

It’s an epidemic, and like Zika or Ebola, it respects no borders. Referred to as the “globalization of prostitution,” human sex trafficking (HST) is the fastest growing criminal activity in the world. Its number one destination is the United States, and it has spread to our back yard with traffickers doing business throughout the Lehigh Valley. Detection, protection and prevention — the usual goals in health-related epidemics — face major challenges with HST because, as the World Vision humanitarian organization and other experts explain, it is a highly complex, multidimensional problem that involves social, economic, educational, health, political and criminological sectors of our society. It also requires a high degree of collaboration among those sectors.  

By Carole Gorney

 

FESTIVALS

Celtic Classic brings highland spirit

The 29th annual Celtic Classic and Highland Games festival Sept. 23 - 25 in downtown Bethlehem attracted sizable crowds all days. Visitors with Irish, Scottish and Welsh family ties and interest came from the Lehigh Valley and beyond to find Celtic Highland games, Irish pipe bands, athleticism, entertainment, dancing, food, beverages, merchandise, and cultural ties. Photo: Freedom HS Patriot Marching Band member Josh Noel stands out i nthe parade by playing a gleaming green baritone saxophone. The brass musician said he borrowed the colorful instrument from a family friend for the Celtic Classic.

By Tim Gilman and Dorothy and Dennis Glew

 

COMMUNITY

Workers celebrate Labor Day

Steelworkers and Friends Labor Day Parade in Bethlehem is led by United Steelworkers local 2599 with president Jerry Green greeting parade watchers with a microphone. “We represent the working class of America,” he announced repeatedly as the parade proceeded along historic Main Street from the Bethlehem festival grounds below. The annual Sunday parade dates back to 2008.

By Tim Gilman

 

COMMUNITY

May peace prevail on Earth

Peace walkers gather for group photos at SteelStacks campus outside PBS39 before a peace walk and peace pole ceremony near the public television offices and studios. The peace walk was the final event of LEPOCO’s 50th anniversary celebration.

By Tim Gilman

 

CLASSROOM

Making kids feel special

For the sixth year in a row, the St. Luke’s School of Nursing student nurse association collected backpacks and filled them with school supplies so that children of families that participate in the hospital’s maternal child health programs would have some of the educational supplies needed when the new school year started up. Nursing School students solicited contributions throughout the St. Luke’s University Hospital Network and were able to provide over 100 backpacks to support children who need them most. Binders, tablets, filler paper, pencils and markers were among each backpack’s contents. Photo: The smiles of Elias Sanchez and Jeremiah Barbosa show how much receiving a backpack filled with school supplies can mean to a child.

By Dana Gubb

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Becahi’s defense controls Red Rovers

They say defense wins championships and if that’s the case, Bethlehem Catholic’s football team has a real shot to that this season following last Friday’s 20-9 victory over Easton at Cottingham Stadium. It was the first victory over Easton since 2002 for Becahi and one that left a defensive stamp for the 5-1 Golden Hawks. Becahi forced five turnovers, setting up all their points on the night, but more importantly, came away with more confidence as they head into this week’s massive home matchup with Parkland (5-1). Nick Petros had two of Becahi’s three interceptions and Isaiah Onuschak returned a 43-yard fumble return for a second quarter touchdown to give the Hawks a 7-3 lead they would never relinquish.

By Peter Car

 

LV FOCUS

‘Carrie’ opens Civil Theatre’s season

Civic Theatre of Allentown Artistic Director William Sanders has done it again. He’s directing a seasonally-appropriate musical to open Civic’s season. This time it’s “Carrie: The Musical,” Oct. 7-23. In the previous two seasons, Civic opened with “The Addams Family” and “Young Frankenstein.” Civic’s 2016-17 season continues with its annual production of “A Christmas Carol,” Dec. 2-17 on the main stage and, in a first for Civic, a second show running simultaneously, “The SantaLand Diaries,” Dec. 9-18 in Theatre 5014.

By Paul Willistein

 

O
THER STORIES

Bethlehem: Flatiron sign to tout Ambassadors

Bethlehem Twp.: Engineer sought for community center repairs

Opinion: Gerrymandering-Scrounging  for cosponsors

Valley: Dent hosts immunization panel discussion

Valley: Witnesses speak again wind turbines

Valley: Organization helps families suffering loss of newborns

Valley: Wounded Warriors vs. Police

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

To advertise: Ad staff

Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter