OUR 10TH YEAR OF SERVICE
TO THE CITY OF BETHLEHEM, BETHLEHEM AND HANOVER TOWNSHIPS AND THE BOROUGHS OF FOUNTAIN HILL, FREEMANSBURG AND HELLERTOWN

Phone: 610-625-2121 FAX: 610-625-2126 gtaylor@tnonline.com

Tuesday, August 15, 2017


August 16, 2017

COVER STORY

Administrators against armed staff

The states senate last month passed bill 383, which allows school district staff and faculty who possess concealed-carry permits to carry firearms on school property. Educators across the state have spoken against the bill. Bethlehem Area School District Superintendent  Dr.Joseph Roy said he’d be uncomfortable with guns in the hands of anyone other than trained professionals. He told Lehigh Valley Live anything else raises the risk that some innocent person is going to get hurt,

By Nate Jastrzemski and Ed Courrier

 

LEHIGH VALLEY

Fab Lab: ‘Fabulous Fabrication’

Northampton Community College’s Fab Lab in South Bethlehem will double its space and learning opportunities when NCC’s Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship opens in May 2018. The initiative is being made possible by a $7 million grant to renovate the first floor of the Fowler Family Southside Center on East Third Street, where the Fab Lab will expand to half of the new space for innovation, and the remaining space will be devoted to entrepreneurship. Photo:  Tobor the Great, named after the robot in the eponymous 1954 film, was designed and built by Fab Lab instructors working together for a total of 10,000 hours. The robotic arm acts under the control of the special glove shown on the arm of the man in the background.

By Carole Gorney

 

MUSIKFEST

Fest comes to a close

Joining hundreds of other Santana fans in lawn chairs or on blankets along First Street, are Kathleen Wentz from Bethlehem Township and Kathy Brown from Bethlehem. They agreed that listening just outside the gated Sands Steel Stage venue is a lot of fun.

Photos by Dana Grubb, Lori Patrick and Tim Gilman

 

PEOPLE

Cub Scout day camp adventures

The occasional cloudbursts couldn’t dampen spirits at the Cub Scout Day Camp at Louise Moore Park in Easton July 14, the last day of a week-long adventure. Fortunately, it was sunny for most of the week while the nearly 100 Cub Scouts from area packs moved among various activity stations to have fun and learn. Staffed by 60 scout leaders and volunteers, these included stations for scouting skills, science, sports, water sports, archery and BB gun marksmanship. Photo: On their last day of the week-long Cub Scout Day Camp at Louise Moore Park, the kids and their leaders still ‘have a ball’ despite some drippy weather.

By Ed Courrier

 

COMMUNITY

Tooth Fairy visits National Night Out

National Night Out, held on the first Tuesday of August, is a chance for police and other first responders to get together with the local residents they serve and show them that they all care. Bethlehem Township has one of best of these community gatherings at its municipal park. In addition to a moon bounce, water slide and all kinds of educational exhibits, there’s also plenty of free food donated by area businesses and restaurants for a crowd of nearly 1,000 people. But the star of the night would have to be the tooth fairy, who flew in before she started work that evening to hand out toothbrushes and pencils to area children. Photo: The Tooth fairy is actually Gabrielle Matejcik, whose toothbrush might be a bit too big for Sophia Bermudez.

By Bernie O’Hare

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Tony’s To-Cat wins TOC

The 28th version of Catasauqua’s Tournament of Champions proved to be an old-fashioned basketball barnburner. Top-Cat, the champion of the nearby Stiles League, defended its title with a tight-knit, 62-59 win over Ohlson’s Landscaping to capture the crown. Derek Hall hit John Amoroso for a layup with roughly 15 seconds remaining in the game to help Top-Cat to the title. It was a close contest throughout the night, as the tournament featured its share of interesting games. Teams from Allentown, Allentown JCC, Bangor, Catasauqua, Catty Over 35, North Catasauqua, Stiles and Summit Hill participated.

By Jeff Moeller

 

LV FOCUS

A cool award

Douglas Wiltraut received a Ruth G. Rosenau Silver Medallion in the Adirondacks National Exhibition of American Watercolors for “A Cool Sip” (dry brush watercolor, 35 in. x 54 in.).

Wiltraut’s long-time friend, Bob Schaffer, posed for the watercolor near the “Poughkeepsie Bridge,” a 19th-century railroad trestle south of Slatington along the Lehigh River. This is the third time Schaffer modeled for an award-winning work by Wiltraut. The award presentation for “A Cool Sip” was Aug. 4 in Old Forge, N.Y.

By Ed Courrier

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem Area SD: Sage new Freedom assistant principal

Bethlehem: HARB assists with pergola proposal

Bethlehem: YWCA launches ‘Music & Memory’

Lehigh Valley: Task Force thanked for helping veterans

Lehigh Valley: Daycare own pleads in infant’s death

Lehigh Valley: UGI donation benefits are children

Northampton County; Convicted murderer blames lawyer, ex-wife

Solar eclipse viewing: Some do’s and don’ts

Fountain Hill: Firemen, police thanks for blaze response

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

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Tuesday, August 8, 2017


August 9, 2017



COVER STORY: MUSIKFEST

‘A celebration ... of everything we are’

The opening ceremony for the 34th year of Musikfest was kicked off with a simple question by ArtsQuest President and CEO Kassie Hilgert Aug. 4 at Wells Fargo Festplatz: “Who wants to get a festival started?” But before the 10-day festival could officially begin, Hilgert thanked everyone who continues to make Musikfest possible each year, including this year’s 1,800 volunteers, more than 150 corporate partners and “every department at city hall.” Photo: The new Martin Guitar Co. stage hosts folk singer Carly Moffa from Nashville, Tenn., Aug. 5 for her first Musikfest performance. The 16th and newest stage at the Yuengling Festplatz tent attracted a standing-room-only crowd. The free performance was the right ticket for Musikfest visitors. Festival artists will perform more than 40 acoustic sets and open mic sessions will be available for concert attendees.

By Katya Hrichak and Tim Gilman

 

POLICE

Summer camp takes a turn

It’s a plot line right out of a summertime horror film: Kids playing in a park happily until the monster arrives. In this case, the children were part of a summer camp experience hosted by the Bethlehem NAACP. It was the organization‘s first time offering the camp for young people ages 5 – 18 at Saucon Park on Williams Street in Bethlehem. The monster itself didn’t show up at the camp, but it left its droppings: the head of a dark-skinned baby doll ripped from its body and impaled on a stick. Photo: Grace Spruiell leads campers in a sing-a-long during an otherwise enjoyable camp experience for local children.

By Nate Jastrzemski

 

COMMUNITY

‘Wanting to see neighborhood succeed’

The Bethlehem Area Public Library Southside Branch partnered with New Bethany Ministries to offer a program titled “Fight Hunger and Homelessness” at the library July 27. The program, part of the adult summer series “Build a Better World,” focused explicitly on the impact hunger and homelessness have on Bethlehem and the greater Lehigh Valley.

Kate Cohen, director of development and communications at New Bethany Ministries, began the presentation by introducing both the organization and the prominence of the selected issues within the community. She quizzed the audience on what they knew of current statistics related to food deserts, food insecurity, homelessness and the affordability of housing.

By Katya Hrichak

 

PEOPLE

‘Give thanks for our time together’

Their senior year at the Liberty HS and Bethlehem Vo-Tech schools was marked with noteworthy 20th century events. President Franklin Roosevelt would die suddenly in April 1945, the furious final months of World War II in Europe would conclude in May, and the final push to defeat Japan in the Pacific was gaining momentum. Just a couple of months after they graduated, the first atomic bombs were used in warfare. Their entire generation had grown up through the Great Depression. In June, 40 surviving members of the class of 1945 and their guests gathered at the Palace Restaurant for a buffet luncheon to mark 72 years since they graduated, noting there probably might not be additional opportunities for reunions, as those who organized and attended are mostly nonagenarians. Photo: Reunion committee chairperson Joseph Kricks addresses his classmates and their guests at the reunion held at the Palace Restaurant. Kricks, who attended with his wife, Kathryn, was class president. His family owned the well-known Bethlehem business, Kricks’ Bakery.

By Dana Grubb

 

IIRP’S 2017 SUMMER SEMINAR

Dealing with cultural trauma

Racism, and dealing with the trauma that it causes, was one of more than a dozen related subjects discussed at the International Institute of Restorative Practices’ 2017 Summer Symposium at the Hotel Bethlehem in July. A total of 78 people from around the world attended the three-day event titled, “A Restorative Journey: Transforming Relational Harm.”

Photo: Presenter Kevin Jones works with traumatized students in transition schools, as well as being a student and family services school administrator. After providing restorative practices training to his school, he says the climate there has improved tremendously, including dramatic changes in student behavior and improved attendance.

By Carole Gorney

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Football teams get on the field

Monday may have been a dreary day across the region, but for football fans, it was a joyous occasion as the official first day of camp opened for high school teams across the state. With the heat acclimatization period kicking off, Monday’s weather provided reprieve from any hot temperatures, as the overcast sky provided a cool and damp opening day, setting the stage for a moderately warm week for players and coaches to get their bearings on the new season.

By Peter Car

 

LV FOCUS

Eyes wide shut

Despite what many are claiming, this year marks Jethro Tull’s 49th anniversary, not its 50th anniversary. “I come across that all the time. People just seem to want to jump the gun,” says Ian Anderson, lead vocalist, flautist, acoustic guitarist, and founding member of Jethro Tull. “But honestly, even if it was, this has been just another tour. It’s been just another tour since the beginning. I’m not an anniversary guy. It’s just not on my mind. I don’t think that way.” Jethro Tull by Ian Anderson is touring the United States in 2017, playing some of its biggest hits, including “Locomotive Breath,” “Living In The Past,” “Bungle In The Jungle” and “Aqualung,” with a Musikfest concert at 7:30 p.m. Aug. 13, Sands Steel Stage at PNC Plaza, SteelStacks, Bethlehem.

By Luke Muench

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: Council meeting done in minutes

Bethlehem: HCC tables ‘pencil-like structure’

Bethlehem: Wesley Church-‘We’ve Got Your Back Covered’

Northampton County: Bethlehem wants tax breaks for northern neighborhood

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

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Tuesday, August 1, 2017


Aug, 2, 2017

COVER STORY

Dog tales wag tails

A Read to Dogs program attracted 25 children to the June 26 session at the main branch of the Bethlehem Area Public Library on Church Street. The young readers are paired with gentle and attentive trained therapy dogs during four 15-minute sessions. Six canines and their local owners showed up for the special event, which has been offered by the library for 10 years, according to Pat Mickowski of Bethlehem, local community coordinator for the program. Photo: Beverly Raymond’s bassett hound patiently listens to a book being read by Javien Cortes, who was participating for the first time, according to his mother, Amber Cortes of Bethlehem.

By TimGilman

 

BETHLEHEM

Police, fire departments hold joint ceremony

In a rapid ceremony July 21, during which the Rotunda was packed with city officials, family, friends, media and fellow uniformed public servants, 10 people were honored with promotions or welcomed into their ranks. Mayor Bob Donchez announced, “Bethlehem’s approach to safety has seen many changes over the years. The implementation of new technology and training techniques. They have improved the equipment that is used. But that cannot change the critical factor that one needs to be a police officer or firefighter, and that is character. Photo: In a joint ceremony of the police and fire departments, four new police officers are sworn in by Mayor Bob Donchez.

By Nate Jastrzemski

 

ANIMAL ASSISTED STRAEGIES

Going to the dogs for help

Downtown Bethlehem went to the dogs one Tuesday in June, when mental health clinician Lynette Reed used service and therapy dogs to demonstrate how they and other animals are being used to help people suffering the effects of trauma. The demonstration was part of Reed’s presentation on “Animal Assisted Strategies in Creating Safety” during the International Institute for Restorative Practice’s three-day 2017 Summer Symposium at the Hotel Bethlehem. Photo: Jingles is a therapy dog owner Joyce McGettigen of Churchville uses in school reading programs. Animals provide a bridge between teachers and students and can help relieve stress in the classroom. Jingles has been trained to work in many different settings and conditions.

By Carole Gorney

 

PEOPLE

Breathing life into the discarded

Award-winning Lehigh Valley pastel artist Jacqueline Meyerson has added yet another honor to her impressive list of prizes and recognition by being selected to exhibit her painting, “Locked Up,” this September at the National Arts Club’s 45th annual “Enduring Brilliance” competition in Manhattan.  To compete, Meyerson’s painting had to be juried from among 1,300 entries, with only 180 being selected. “This is the crown jewel of pastel exhibitions, and to go to this event is very exciting,” Meyerson says. Photo: Pastel artist Jackie Meyerson creates her wonders in her studio in the basement of her Macungie home. She has shown in 16 exhibitions this year, from local galleries to international competitions.

By Carole Gorney

 

LEHIGH VALLEY

Dent recognized Military Academies Class of 2021

Congressman Charlie Dent (R-15th) held his 12th annual send-off reception for high school students from his district who will be attending one of the United States Service Academies this fall June 19 at his 3900 Hamilton Boulevard office in Allentown. Photo: Congressman Charlie Dent (R-15th) stands with Class of 2021 U.S. Service Academy students Caleb Vargo of Palmyra (U.S. Naval Academy), Vincent James Jenkins of Bethlehem (U.S. Merchant Marine Academy), Michael Schnabel of Macungie (U.S. Naval Academy), Reilly McGinnis of Macungie (U.S. Military Academy at West Point), Serena Johnson of Orefield (U.S. Naval Academy), Andrew Posch of Bethlehem (U.S. Military Academy at West Point), and Konstandinos Zaharakis of Bethlehem (U.S. Naval Academy) at the Congressman’s 12th annual U.S. Service Academy send-off reception at his Hamilton Boulevard office in Allentown.

By Aaron Berger

 

COMMUNITY

Church connects with art

Children shared creativity and laughs at Fritz United Methodist Church during the church’s first summer art camp. Twenty-one children ages 5 to 12 spent each night learning different art techniques and practiced their new skills on a variety of projects. After the five-night program, running from July 24 to 28, students gained a better understanding of art, took home art creations of their own and made some new friends. Each night started off with dinner, followed by some free time outdoors with activities such as relay races, jump rope and chalk drawing.  After the outdoor fun, the art lessons began. Photo: Before the painting begins, students have a brief lesson about famous landscape artists and the techniques used in their works. Students then utilize their new knowledge when it is their turn to paint.

By Allison Poczak

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

FHS: Athletes of the Year

Callahan overcome injuries his senior year

By Peter Car

Swint was all-round great person, athlete

By Katie McDonald

 

LV FOCUS

The Musikfest experience

The 34th annual Musikfest, Aug. 4-13, features more than 400 performers from the United States, Canada, Cuba, Denmark, The Netherlands, Scotland and South Korea, performing on 16 stages on the north and south sides of Bethlehem. Headlining the Sands Steel Stage at PNC Plaza are ticketed concerts: Carlos Santana, Aug. 4; Chicago, Aug. 5; Father John Misty, Aug. 6; Live, Aug. 7; Aloe Blacc, Aug. 8; Godsmack, Aug. 9; Toby Keith, Aug. 10; The Band Perry, Aug. 11; Lee Bice, Justin Moore, Aug. 12, and Jethro Tull by Ian Anderson, Aug. 13. Musikfest highlights include the new Experienceplatz venue featuring the Architects of Air attraction, the Martin Guitar Stage at Yuengling Lagerplatz, and expanded visual arts activities at the Spark Orthodontics Familienplatz family venue, now in the Colonial Industrial Quarter.

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: HARB board approves solar panel installation

South Bethlehem: Mayor’s Task Force reviews police survey

Northampton County: Boscola, Brown hail P3 prison legislation

Northampton County: Judge Dally on problem solving courts

Lehigh Valley: Blood shortage hurts hospitals

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

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Tuesday, July 25, 2017


July 26, 2017

COVER STORY

Film company sets the scene at THE CUP

Anyone passing by the Linden Street landmark known as the Bethlehem Dairy Store, also known as The Cup, on June 29 may have felt as if they were experiencing a time warp. Classic cars from the 1950s and very early 1960s were parked in the store’s lot and along Millard and Linden streets to set the scene for an SAC union independent film being produced by FIFO (Fade In/Fade Out) CEO and founder Bill Hartin. FIFO is a nonprofit filmmaking consortium dedicated to cultivating and growing filmmaking in the Lehigh Valley area.

By Dana Grubb

 

DESALES POLICE SURVEY

Biggest issue: Communions with public

In the spring of 2017, DeSales University, in cooperation with the office of the chief of police and Mayor Robert Donchez, conducted a Bethlehem community survey to investigate the perceptions of safety in Bethlehem neighborhoods by household residents. I hoped that the survey would provide insight and information that the Bethlehem Police Department could utilize in order to better serve the citizens of Bethlehem, target areas of citizens’ concerns and to open additional channels of communication with all members of the community. I also wanted to understand residents’ satisfaction with the police department, their perception of crime and their fear of crime and police community relations and cooperation.

By Mark DiLuzio, Bethlehem police cief

 

FOUNTAIN HILL

Borough welcome new police officer

Fountain Hill Mayor Jose Rosado swears in Reza Imrani as a new part-time Fountain Hill police officer. Imrani previously worked at Moravian College.

By Tracy Rice

 

PEOPLE

‘1927 was a good year’

Friends and five generations of family members gathered around Margaret “Marge” Rooney July 15 at the Our Lady of Perpetual Help Parish Center in Bethlehem to celebrate her 90th birthday. The theme of the surprise party was “1927 was a very good year,” and the room was decorated accordingly. Each table was adorned with sheets of paper listing fun facts from 1927, coasters displaying the year and PEZ candies and Kool-Aid packets, both of which were invented in 1927. Photo: Sons Michael, Patrick, Timothy and Robert Rooney Jr. surround mother Margaret “Marge” Rooney at her 90th birthday surprise celebration July 15.

By Katya Hrichak

 

ENTERTAINMENT

Brew Fest supports WDIY

English beer. Belgian beer in many varieties. German-style beer. Even Chocolate Peanut-butter Stout. Beers of every sort were available to sample July 8 at the Second Annual Homebrew Fest organized by WDIY, the Lehigh Valley’s Community NPR station. Twenty-six homebrewers contributed their wares; nearly 300 guests sampled among the many offerings. One guest described the event as “heaven for beer lovers.” It was also a very successful fund-raiser for WDIY. Photo: Close to 300 people participated in the 2017 Homebrew Fest, nearly filling the Charles A. Brown Ice House.

By Dennis Glew

 

COMMUNITY

Boys and Girls Club host annual fundraiser

The Boys and Girl Club of Bethlehem’s 38th annual golf tournament was held at the Silver Creek Country Club June 12 with 76 golfers participating. One of the organization’s two largest annual fundraisers, participants in the tournament enjoyed lunch on the clubhouse patio, a round of golf and dinner. Photo: The foursome of Jim Baker, Dan Nigito, Dominic Nigito and Dave Weikert teed off from Hole no. 1 to start the tournament.

By Dana Grubb

 

LEHIGH VALLEY

‘Hope for the entire community’

With the addition of the new Children’s Cancer and Multipurpose Infusion Center to the Lehigh Valley Hospital-Cedar Crest campus, the 1210 building on South Cedar Crest Boulevard became entirely devoted to pediatric specialities. The grand opening took place July 18 and the center began receiving patients July 24. Photo: LVHN Department of Pediatrics Chair Nathan Hagstrom cuts the ribbon at the Children’s Cancer and Multipurpose Infusion Center grand opening July 18, surrounded by fellow LVHN employees. The center began receiving patients July 24.

By Katya Hrichak

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Liberty HS Athletes of the Year

Gunner Anglovich sets his goal to be the best

By Peter Car

Jackie Arthur wasn’t planning to be a track star

By Katie McDonald

 

LV FOCUS

Up close and personal

“The Wow Factor” is in effect for the 2017-18 season of the State Theatre Center for the Arts, Easton.The 2016-17 season at the historic State Theatre was billed as “90 years of Wow.” State Theatre President and CEO Shelley Brown says when she was planning the 2017-18 season she made sure that the 91st year would continue to “Wow.” “It really inspired me that it was really important to me that we’re ready for 90 more,” says Brown. “That’s why the tag line, “Nobody does it better.’ “That’s the sentiment that I got all year, and just that it was a great, great venue and meant a great deal. That’s what was inspiring me. That we’re here. We’re here to stay.”

By PaulWillistein

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: 2017 will feature the last city seal

Bethlehem: Zoners approve new UGI tank

Bethlehem: YWCA to celebrate 90 years of service

Bethlehem”: City council approves new parks plan

Northampton County: Council literally in the dark

Bethlehem Township: Wanted-Replacement commissioner

Valley: BB&T, LVCF disburse $1.45M in grants

Valley: Fair queen completes her reign

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

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Tuesday, July 18, 2017


July 19, 2017

COVER STORY

‘They can just be horses now’

At a June 1 ribbon cutting ceremony and a July 8 open house that featured a special visit by the Budweiser Clydesdales, the Bethlehem Police Department, nonprofit Friends of the Bethlehem Mounted Police, and the community celebrated the completion of the new Bethlehem Mounted Police stable. Constructed on 10 acres of land generously leased from the Allentown Diocese, and immediately adjacent to Holy Savior Cemetery, the new structure has housed mounts from the unit, Pharoah, George, Asa and Grey since mid-May. Photo: The big attraction was the Budweiser Clydesdales, but the event was held to celebrate an open house for the new Bethlehem Mounted Patrol stables. Thousands of area residents attended and toured the facility.

By Dana Grubb

 

COMMUNITY

Festive July 4th in Old Edgeboro

On July 4th, current and former residents of the Old Edgeboro section of Bethlehem did what they have been doing for the past 43 years: they gathered on Sycamore Street for the annual Independence Day celebration.Neighbors line the block  with tables and chairs. Overhead are two large American flags suspended over the ends of the block by Marty Plyler. This year, as always, the event began with a reading of the Declaration of Independence. Readers were Vivien Appel and Nick Englesson. As always, the audience enthusiastically applauded lines expressing defiance of England by the colonists. Photo: A long table of entrees and salads is complemented by a table of desserts. Guests brought their own drinks.

By Dennis Glew

 

FESTIVALS

‘An offer you can’t refuse’

Sponsored by the Bethlehem Chamber of Commerce, the Second Annual Bethlehem Italian Festival was held June 17 on Main Street and in the Sun Inn Courtyard. The event featured a “Wine Trail,” with 14 wines curated by South Italy Imports were available for tasting. An “Italian Food Trail” featured culinary delights sampling at nearby participating restaurants like The Brick, Tapas On Main, Twisted Olive, and The Colony Meadery at the Book Shop. Photo: Accompanied by Nick Franco on accordion, actor and singer Gianni Russo serenades diners at Corked on Main Street. Russo, who played Carlo Rizzi in 1972’s “The Godfather,” was in town to promote Don Corleone Organic Italian Vodka with the motto, “An offer you can‘t refuse.”

By Ed Courrier

 

OPIOID CRISIS

‘Warm handoff’ aids addicts

Physician General of Pennsylvania Dr. Rachel Levine gave a press conference at Lehigh Valley Hospital June 12 on new programs which aim at getting drug addicted patients – notably, opioid and heroin abusers – the care they need. Several representatives from the hospital and other local organizations were on hand to give insight on their efforts. Photo: Paige Walsh, addiction recovery liaison, Dr. David Burmeister, D.O., Dr. Rachel Levine, Dr. Robert Cannon, D.O. and Layne Turner speak during the presentation on warm handoffs at Lehigh Valley Hospital.

By Christopher Dryfoos

 

ANOTHER VIEW
What to do if your doctor prescribes an opioid

A TV commercial for a network of treatment centers encourages drug addicts to contact them for rehab. Another has New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie warning there is an epidemic of opioid addiction, but addicts have a way out. “Help is within reach,” he says. You might have seen these commercials, but perhaps you have not been – as I have – swallowing an oxycodone tablet while watching them.

By Linda Wojcichowski

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Bethlehem Catholic Athletes of the Year

Tessa Zamolyi: As high school sports seasons go, Bethlehem Catholic High School senior Tessa Zamolyi would play volleyball at the beginning of the school year and compete in track and field at the end, but in the middle, the heart of the season, it was basketball that would take center stage in her athletic career.

By Katie McDonald

Mikey Labriola: When Mikey Labriola first got to Bethlehem Catholic his freshman year, it would be fair to say that wrestling coach Jeff Karam was not one of his favorite people.

By Peter Car

 

LV FOCUS

Afternoon and night delight

July 22 promises to be a jazz lover’s delight in the Lehigh Valley. The Pennsylvania Jazz Collective presents its second annual “Christmas City Summer Jazz Festival,” 12:30 - 10  p.m. July 22 at the Bethlehem Municipal Ice Rink, 345 Illick’s Mill Road, Bethlehem. There will be 12 groups on two stages. Festival headliner is Tom Schuman of Spyro Gyra. Schuman and Jazz Collective Artistic Director Alan Gaumer go back to the late 1970s when a twenty-something Gaumer needed a sub for a gig in upstate New York. The drummer recommended a teen-aged Schuman and Gaumer was “blown away by his playing.” The two have kept in touch since, including after Schuman relocated to Las Vegas. Spyro Gyra plays the Blue Note in New York City on July 25, allowing for Schuman’s Bethlehem festival appearance.

By George Vandoren

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: Casinos, locals at odds with state

Bethlehem: Steeples  & Steel tour dates announced

Bethlehem: School band members recognized

Valley: Officers recognized for DUI/traffic enforcement

Valley: Area residents complete management program

Lehigh County: Commissions dole out casino hosting funds

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

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Wednesday, July 12, 2017


July 12, 2017

COVER STORY-JULY 4TH IN THE CITY

Community reads the Declaration

The sixth annual Fourth of July reading of the Declaration of Independence took place at Bethlehem’s Payrow Plaza in the late morning of Independence Day with over one hundred area residents in attendance. Readers for 2017 were Northampton County Court of Common Pleas Judge Emil Giordano, Lehigh Valley dentist Tom Gyory, Bethlehem Councilman Eric Evans, Northampton County Councilmen Glenn Geissinger, Matthew Deitz, Hayden Phillips and Seth Vaughn, Bethlehem Mayor Bob Donchez, Bethlehem Police Chief Mark DiLuzio and former Lehigh County Commissioner Dean Browning. The Gilbert family provided vocal accompaniment on the singing of the national anthem and “God Bless America,” and Bethlehem based Boy Scout Troop #59 led the Pledge of Allegiance. Photo: The Fourth of July in Bethlehem concluded with the city’s traditional fireworks display. Launched from the centrally located Sand Island along the Lehigh River, the pyrotechnics give residents many vantage points from which to enjoy the sounds and colorful bursts as the nation celebrates its independence. This view is from St. Michael’s Cemetery.

By Dana Grubb

 


PEOPLE

Becahi principal goes home

Bethlehem Catholic’s principal for the past seven years, John Petruzzelli, has taken the next step of his career, returning to his hometown of Philadelphia as principal of St. Joseph’s Preparatory School, where he once worked as dean of students. Petruzelli made an impression and was well liked by the students. From his quirky morning announcements to taking cameos in school plays to setting up opportunities for the student body to hoot out SpongeBob Squarepants references during assemblies, he helped change the culture and attitude at the school. Despite the excitement about starting the new job, “I’m very sad about leaving,” he said in an email from Philly. “It’s tough to leave a place that you have loved and invested so much time and energy into. The kids have been amazing. I will really miss them.”

By Nate Jastrzemski

 

COMMUNITY

Moravian Day celebrates city’s founding

Moravian Day, a festival for Moravians and the community, was held June 17 on the grounds of Central Moravian Church and the nearby Moravian community in historic downtown Bethlehem. The event featured entertainment, food, music and family-oriented activities. The admission-free celebration was sponsored by the Bethlehem Area Moravians (BAM) and other Moravian entities as part of a 2016-17 schedule of special events marking the 275th anniversary of the Moravian founding of Bethlehem in 1741. A 275th anniversary Moravian Lovefeast followed on June 25 in Johnston Hall, Moravian College. Photo: Madeleine Atwood, a Central Moravian Church member and Liberty HS graduate, attempts a 19th century wooden hoop and stick game. The Moravian Historical Society provided the game “Graces,” especially for girls “to teach them poise and grace,” said Suzanne Keller of the MHS.

By Tim Gilman

 

BETHLEHEM

Sister City program marks 21st year

Gray skies and drizzle forced the annual Slovenian flag-raising ceremony from Payrow Plaza into the Rotunda on June 23, but the spirit of those in attendance was not dampened. Bethlehem-Murska Sobota Sister Cities Association founder Stephen Antalics Jr. acted as master of ceremonies, and Robi Poredos of the Slovenian Press Agency gave the invocation and benediction. The guest speaker was Deputy Chief of Mission at the Republic of Slovenia Embassy, Vladimir Kolmanic, who attended with his wife Vesna and son, Amir. Kolmanic noted the 26th anniversary of Slovenian independence and 21st anniversary of the Sister City relationship between Bethlehem and Murska Sobota. Photo: Attendees at the ceremony join in singing “God Bless America” at its conclusion.

By Dana Grubb

 


CLASSROOM

Charter Arts students present ‘Dance Quilt’

The Lehigh Valley Charter HS for the Arts stitched together a graceful “Dance Quilt” of ballet, modern, and tap styles with the help of visiting alumnus Nicholas Heffelfinger May 19 and 20. Heffelfinger, recently graduated from Boston Conservatory. According to artistic director of dance Kim Maniscalco, “For me a quilt represents many hours of work put forth from the hands of many people. The outcome is always a thing of beauty …” “Our quilt was not only to please the eye and soul, but for its own practical purpose; to serve as a training ground for our young dance students.”

For more information on the school, visit charterarts.org. Photo: From left, Karina McKenna, Josh Frumkin and Hailey Fleming join Malcolm Burton and Emerson Ahn during “Le Papillon,” a student-choreographed work by Kaitlyn Fritz.

By Ed Courrier

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Larimar new Liberty boys soccer coach

Former Liberty High School soccer player and Moravian College graduate Ian Larimer is the new head coach for the Hurricanes’ boys’ soccer team. Shortly after he was hired earlier this year and shortly after the team’s strength and conditioning work had been done, Larimer held a group meeting with Liberty soccer players to outline his philosophy, among other things.

By Katie McDonald

 

LV FOCUS

‘Cirque It’ City

Touchstone Artistic Director JP Jordan was in Peru when he first decided to create the Jakopa’s Punch Band. “I was in Peru when I got word that David Bowie had passed,” Jordan explains, “and I was told that The Lesson Center planned to host a benefit for leukemia patients in honor of Bowie. “Now, I didn’t have a band at the time, but I asked if I could play a set if I could pull a band together in time, and they said sure. So we ended up getting together this group of musicians.” The name of the band stems from Jordan asking his niece what she thought “JP” stood for. “It just fit. I like to think that the band itself, the music, is the punch.”

By Luke Muench

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: Little progress made advancing ethics proposal

Bethlehem: Summer book sale opens July 19

Bethlehem: BASD longtime ESOL teach retires

Fountain Hill: Borough performs summer cleaning

Northampton County: Council passers on greater contract oversight

Lehigh Valley: 31 added to are volunteer fire depts.

Lehigh Valley: PCFLV dedicates ‘Ray of Sunshine’

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

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