OUR 10TH YEAR OF SERVICE
TO THE CITY OF BETHLEHEM, BETHLEHEM AND HANOVER TOWNSHIPS AND THE BOROUGHS OF FOUNTAIN HILL, FREEMANSBURG AND HELLERTOWN

Phone: 610-625-2121 FAX: 610-625-2126 gtaylor@tnonline.com

Tuesday, October 17, 2017


October 18, 2017

COVER STORY

Nitschmann 2.0: Not your grandfather’s middle school

Nitschmann MS hosted an open house Oct. 4 for the public to showcase the new $53.1 million, 180,000-square-foot building. The evening began with Principal Peter Mayes giving a brief introduction in the school’s auditorium before inviting everyone to explore the new school. Many teachers and students were posted around the campus and in classrooms to greet the public and answer questions.

By Mark Kirlin

 

VIEWS

Let’s talk civility

In the midst of recent tragedies and current events, the topic of civility comes to the forefront. By definition, civility is formal politeness and courtesy in behavior or speech, focusing on other people rather than our own self interests. George Washington wrote “Rules of Civility and Decent Behavior.” Today most of these rules seem outdated. However, the core message remains relevant; setting aside our self-interests and focusing on respecting others.

By Jacquelyn Youst

 

COMMUNITY

‘Preserv[ing] the connection’

After six years of being closed, the High Street Bridge was dedicated in a reopening ceremony Sept. 25.“As many of you know, this bridge used to be a single-lane wooden bridge that was owned and maintained by Norfolk Southern. Quite honestly, we’ve had issues with the bridge for at least the past 20 years in terms of deficiencies, and a couple of times it was closed,” said Michael Alkhal, city director of public works. Photo: Michael Waldron cuts the ribbon and officially reopens the High Street Bridge in Hellertown.

By Katya Hrichak

 

BUSINESS

Framing what you love

After years in an Eastside studio, Girl on the Hill Framing has moved to a new shop in center city. Offering custom framing for home and business use, art preservation and the sale of vintage pieces, owner Dawn Moser said she relishes the chance to help people find creative answers to their questions about art and family relics. Photo: oves the history of downtown Bethlehem. She is a graduate of Saucon Valley HS, Northampton Community College and Kutztown University, and over the past 15 years has worked on art installations and framing projects for local artists, ArtsQuest, Lehigh University, Lehigh Valley Hospital and the Sands Casino.

By Nate Jastrzemski

 

BETHLEHEM HISTORY

‘Firefighting’ author to speak Nov. 8

The newly released book “Firefighting in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, 1741–1917” tells the story of how a town battled the elements – and won. It is the first of its kind, with many never-before-seen photographs. The authors (right), Nancy Rutman, Chris Eline and Karen Samuels, will discuss their research for the book and present a slideshow about Bethlehem firefighting Nov. 8, 7 p.m., at Seidersville Hall, 3700 Old Philadelphia Pike. Nancy Rutman discovered an interest in American history as a teenager, during the nation’s bicentennial in 1976. Chris Eline is a local historian and firefighter for the Bethlehem Fire Department for 24 years. Karen Samuels is an author of seven books on Bethlehem area history and a Keystone Press Award-winning newspaper columnist.

 

BURNSIDE

Apples Fest single autumn’s arrival

There couldn’t have been a better way to say ‘goodbye’ to summer and ‘hello’ to autumn than Historic Bethlehem Museum and Sites’ 4th annual Family Fun Apple Days Festival. On Sept. 9 and 10, the Burnside Plantation hosted record numbers of over 3,500 apple lovers from locations all over the Lehigh Valley. Photo: A new addition to this year’s festival intrigued dog lovers such as Raelynn and her father, who read to Abby, a therapy dog from Therapy Dogs International. The therapy dogs were adored by all and Richard, left, Abby’s owner, noted the smiles the four-legged friends bring to everyone’s faces.

By Allison Poczak

 

FREEDOM/EMMAUS

Fighting pediatric cancer … together

rior to the Sept. 29 football game, students from Freedom and Emmaus teamed up to help raise money and awareness for pediatric cancer. Both student sections observed “gold-outs” to support the Pediatric Cancer Foundation of the Lehigh Valley (PCFLV). FHS and EHS have both been selling the “gold-out” shirts in school, as this is the main way to obtain donations and participate in this event. PCFLV helps cover all of the medical expenses for kids with cancer in the Lehigh Valley who are registered with them and also have fun little events for the kids throughout the year. Photo: Freedom football player Alec Huertas runs onto the field with Mackenzie Cleffi, daughter of Michael Cleffi (a teacher at Freedom) who recently had her last chemotherapy treatment.

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

LHS wins D-11 golf title

The Liberty High School golf team once again brought home the hardware, capturing the District 11 team title after also winning the East Penn Conference title two weeks ago. The Hurricanes lost to teams like Emmaus and Parkland during the regular season, but leading up to the EPC tournament, felt they had an advantage with their top-five golfers and that certainly proved to be the case.

By Mike Haines and Scott Pagel

 

LV FOCUS

Sounding Beethoven

There has long been a connection between art and music, with one often inspiring the other.  Many musicians are also artists and vice-versa. Years ago, when I first started conducting the Allentown Symphony Orchestra, someone asked me if I had ever heard any of the sound sculptures created by the artist Harry Bertoia. At that point I had not, so they invited me out to Harry’s barn and studio in Bally, Berks County, along Route 100, about 15 miles from Allentown.

By Diane Wittry

 

OTHER STORIES

Valley: LANTA, union team up for Puerto Rican relief

Valley: Giant donates $250K for Hurricane Irma relief

133rd District: Jeanne McNeill accepts nomination

Bethlehem: City announces public meeting for parking review

Bethlehem: HCC members warm to cold storage plan

Northampton County: Audit reveals questionable P-card use

Northampton County: Gaming board reluctant to gamble with $745K in slots revenue

South Bethlehem: Charter Arts presents ‘Waiting for Godot’

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

To advertise: Ad staff

Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter





Tuesday, October 10, 2017


October 11, 2017

COVER STORY

Terror in Vegas: Bethlehem woman at nearby casino

Jennifer Miller was just looking to have a good time at a Las Vegas show with her sister-in-law Charlene Gibson.  Unfortunately, that show was near the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino, where on Sunday night, Stephen Paddock shot and killed dozens of concertgoers at a country music festival across from the hotel. “Me and my sister-in-law went out, just us two. It was our first time,” the Bethlehem resident said. “We were in the Cirque de Soleil Michael Jackson ONE show. The show started at 9:30, and at about 20 to 11 they stopped everything. At first they said they were having difficulties and to bear with them. We thought they were just technical difficulties.” Photo: Jennifer Miller and Charlene Gibson pose for a photo during their Las Vegas vacation, where they attended a show close to the location of the shooting that claimed 59 lives Oct. 1.

By Brian Myszkowski

 

OPINION

‘Domestic terrorism, plain and simple’

Platinum recording artist Jason Aldean’s set was tragically interrupted at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival in Las Vegas Oct. 1 when a gunman opened fire on the crowd, killing 59 people and injuring roughly 600 more. It is a sad reality we live in as Americans when we are not safe at the movies, schools, churches, and now music concerts. Just five months after the Manchester, England attack during an Ariana Grande concert, we now have an even deadlier attack happening here in the United State. It is extremely terrifying and disheartening to know that this is something that is beginning to happen so often, especially at a place that is meant to be about fun and the enjoyment of music.

By Selena Cintron

 


POLICE

Shooting suspect apprehended in city

John Michael Hann, 61, was arraigned Thursday afternoon on charges of homicide and attempted homicide in connection with a shooting in Lehigh Township the night before.  Hann is accused of shooting and killing his cousin, Joseph F. Mullner, 64. Mullner’s wife Melinda, who called police at 6:26 p.m. on Wednesday to report what had happened, was also shot. She is hospitalized with life-threatening injuries. Lehigh Township police found her husband’s body in the driveway of their Longacre Drive home. Photo: Lehigh Township Police Chief Scott Fogel discusses the case.

By Bernie O’Hare

 

ED’S WORLD

Graphic commentary by award-winning artist Ed Courrier

 

BETHLEHEM

Hotel may be new CRIZ site

The City of Bethlehem’s CRIZ may get a new property in its jurisdiction.  The Hotel Bethlehem on Main Street in Bethlehem is a candidate to be among the projects under the taxes for development program known as the City Revitalization and Improvement Zone or CRIZ. Last week, Bethlehem Mayor Bob Donchez announced that he recommends that the hotel and other properties be included in the CRIZ.  If approved, the iconic Hotel Bethlehem, according to Managing Director Bruce Haines, will allow previously developed expansion plans to proceed.  Expansion plans had been “put in a drawer” by the Hotel Bethlehem ownership, but when Donchez succeeded in getting the CRIZ language re-written to include additional properties, Haines and his partners realized that their shelved expansion plans would be much less risky under the provisions of the CRIZ. Photo: View of proposed Hotel Bethlehem expansion from the historic district looking east.

By Douglas Graves

 

ENTERTAINMENT/CULTURE

Celtic Classic marks 30th year

The Celtic Classic Festival marked its 30th anniversary Sept. 22-24 this year. The festival is said to be the largest free Celtic Fest and Highland Games in North America. Jayne Ann Recker, executive director of the Celtic Cultural Alliance, said, “This year’s festival was very well attended, with new things for the 30th anniversary well received. We’ll definitely be back next year.” Photo: The festival grounds underneath the Hill-to-Hill Bridge features a food court and the Grand Pavilion entertainment tent in the background below downtown Bethlehem. Celtic beer is popular at the festival.

By Tim Gilman and Dorothy and Dennis Glew
 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Becahi falls to Parkland, 38-24

The Bethlehem Catholic football team fell into an early hole, and could not dig themselves out last Friday night at Parkland School District Stadium. The Golden Hawks found themselves down 17-3 heading into halftime against Parkland, and then trailed 24-3, their biggest deficit of the game, early in the third quarter. They were able to battle back and make things interesting, but the Trojans answered any Becahi score and held on for a 38-24 victory in a battle of unbeaten teams at the top of the Eastern Pennsylvania Conference.

By CJ Hemerly

 

LV FOCUS

Getting into the act

For director Ara Barlieb and the Crowded Kitchen Players (CK Players) theater company, “Act One” is a production that everyone wanted to be a part of. “Like a lot of theater companies, we are drawn to plays about theater,” Barlieb says. “It’s really compelling to do a play about a play.” Barlieb says that, to the best of his knowledge, “Act One” has never been performed outside of New York City.The Lehigh Valley premiere of “Act One” will be presented by the CK Players at 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays, Oct. 13 - 22, Charles A. Brown IceHouse, Sand Island, 56 River St., Bethlehem.

By Luke Muench

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: Homeless shelter policy altered for winter

Northampton County: Board votes to approver LERTA in city

Police: Homicide arrest made in Fountain Hill shooting

Classroom: Becahi honors top students

Classroom: Becahi tournament-Let’s Par-Tee!

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

To advertise: Ad staff

Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter







 

Tuesday, October 3, 2017


October 4, 2017

COVER STORY

‘My spiritual life-giving guardian’

Molly Troxell never thought that when she first met John Garrity, their working relationship would become a 40-year friendship. Troxell, who recently began her 18th year as an elementary school art instructor, was Garrity’s student teacher at Northern Lehigh ES. “I student-taught in England for half a year before I met Mr. Garrity,” said Troxell, who teaches in the Bethlehem Area School District and is a resident of Emmaus. “At the time, Northern Lehigh was an open concept school with no walls between the classrooms. Despite the very loud and constant noise, Mr. Garrity was an amazing teacher who included pottery making and ceramic art in his curriculum. For him, it was all about encouraging his students to use their imaginations to produce wonderful artwork.” Photo: Molly Troxell, who recently began her 18th year as an elementary school art instructor, was John Garrity’s student teacher at Northern Lehigh Elementary School.

By Rich Strack

 

PEOPLE

Poet Hilda Doolittle honored

The Bethlehem Area Public Library and Lehigh University have partnered to bring recognition to the poet Hilda Doolittle, who was born in Bethlehem in 1886 at the site of the city’s government complex. Added to the list of national Literary Landmarks, a plaque was recently dedicated at the entrance to the main branch of the library on West Church Street.

Head librarian Josh Berk said a lecture on Doolittle by Lehigh University associate professor Seth Moglen had provided the impetus for pursuing the recognition. “Seth’s lecture got us all fired up about H.D.,” said Berk who credited Lehigh University with providing help on the application and sharing the cost of the plaque. Photo: Representing Lehigh University and the Bethlehem Area Public Library are Seth Moglen, associate professor of English, Suzanne Edwards, director of the Humanities Center at Lehigh, Amardeep Singh, associate professor of English, Rayah Levy, director of adult services at the BAPL, Jennie Hyest, assistant director of international studies at Lehigh, Scott Gordon, former chair of the English department at Lehigh, and BAPL head librarian Josh Berk.

By Dana Grubb

 

BETHLEHEM TOWNSHIP

Anderson campus to double capacity

At their Sept. 18 meeting, Bethlehem Township Commissioners voted 4-0 to approve an expansion at St. Luke’s 500-acre Anderson campus that will allow the hospital to double its capacity. “Tower Two,” a four-story hospital building nearly identical to the main site, is what St. Luke’s Vice President Ray Miolam calls the next chapter in the development of the Anderson campus. He anticipates the project will be complete in two and one-half years, with construction starting next spring. Voting yes were Malissa Davis, Mike Hudak, Howard Kutzler and Tom Nolan. Pat Breslin was absent.

By Bernie O’Hare

 

COMMUNITY

Celebrating  Leh’s 169th birthday

A. W. Leh’s 169th Birthday Party Sept. 17. Leh, (1848-1918), the Civil War soldier and architect whose work dominated Bethlehem at the turn of the 20th century, is near and dear to owner Evelyn Beckman. Her event venue and home is located in the old Siegfried Drugstore, which was designed and built by Leh in 1888. Today you can view the original tile, stained glass and new custom woodworking, as well as antique furnishings. Ambre Studio is eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places and is listed on Bethlehem’s Preservation Plan as a “Tier One” type property for protection from demolition described as one of Bethlehem’s “historic treasures.” Photo: Evelyn Beckman of Bethlehem, owner of Ambre Studio, restored the property built by architect A.W. Leh. Beckman has kept the historical aesthetic alive here and celebrates Leh’s birthday each year by hosting a party open to the public.

By Lori Patrick

 

ST. LUKE’S

Baby and Me center opens

The St. Luke’s University Health Network announced the opening of its new Baby and Me Support Center, calling it the “first of its kind in the area.” At a dedication reception Sept. 9, hospital representatives were joined by Bethlehem Mayor Bob Donchez and State Representative Michael Schlossberg (D-132). Jared King, SLUHN service line administrator for women’s and children’s services, said the facility fills a certified need in care. Photo: Hospital and public officials hold a ceremonial ribbon cutting to mark the Sept. 11 opening of the facility.

By Dana Grubb

 

CLASSROOM

Interacting with science

Science and fun collided at the Northampton Community College Fowler Family Center during a Cops ‘n’ Kids Literacy Program event Sept. 20. The collaborative event offered students from the Northeast Ministry after-school homework program the opportunity to try their hands at the game of tennis while simultaneously learning about anatomy and physiology. To kick off this series of science-oriented programming, Cops ‘n’ Kids came together with the Northampton Community College women’s tennis team and Prathysha Kothare, president of Parkland HS’s Science in Technology, Engineering, Arts, Math and Medicine (STEAMM) in Action group. Photo: Members of the NCC women’s tennis team, Parkland HS STEAMM club president Prathysha Kothare partnered with Cops ‘n’ Kids to develop a science-based program series for the Northeast Ministries after-school homework program students.

By Katya Hrichak

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Battle of the unbeaten: Becahi vs. Parkland

High school football games don’t get much bigger than this Friday’s tilt between Bethlehem Catholic and Parkland. The 7 p.m. showdown in Orefield pairs both undefeated squads in the crosshairs, as the winner grabs sole possession of the EPC South. Coming off last week’s 24-17 victory over Easton (4-2), Bethlehem Catholic (6-0) is ready for another pivotal showdown against one of the area’s top programs.

By Peter Car

 

LV FOCUS

Revisit ‘Secret Garden’ at Civic

For director William Sanders, choosing “The Secret Garden” as Civic Theatre’s opening production for the theater’s 90th season was a no-brainer. “Every year we try to find something that is family-friendly, then something that is fun, and then something that would be a little off the beaten path, something a little bit more cutting edge. This [‘Secret Garden’] would be family-friendly,” explains Sanders of how he puts the Civic season together. “The Secret Garden” opens at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 6 and continues at 7:30 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays (and Oct. 21), through Oct. 22 at Civic Theatre of Allentown.

By Luke Muench

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem Area SD: District included in city’s emergency planning

Bethlehem Area SD: Board reviews successful projects

Bethlehem: Water authority awaiting word on pipeline, wind projects

Bethlehem Township: Commissioners consider fire tax, tax break for firefighters

Nation: Celebrating newspapers’ impact on community

Lehigh County: Roberts Youth Services job confirmed

Lehigh County: Cedarbrook renovations approved

South Bethlehem: Tradition rose marks start of Charter Art’s 15th year

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

To advertise: Ad staff

Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter







 

Thursday, September 21, 2017


September 20, 2017

COVER STORY

The voices of recovery

In its 27th year, National Recovery Month is continuing its climb out of the darkness that is the stigma of addiction and into headlines around the globe. This year, Recovery Month follows only a few weeks after President Trump declared the opioid epidemic in America a national emergency. Local Lehigh Valley news has been plagued with stories of tragic deaths from overdoses and families torn apart by addiction. There is no one path to recovery and no one way to erase this problem, but there are millions of voices that are willing and able to help, and here are just a few of them.

By Heather Nigrone


UPDATEMissing woman’s body found
Nearly one month after a woman was reported missing from a home for senior citizens in Salisbury Township, the search is over. Audrey Penn, 78, was pronounced dead 3:44 p.m. Sept. 17 by Deputy Coroner Jack Fliter after her body was found in a drainage ditch in the area of Hamilton Boulevard and Kressler Road, Lower Macungie Township.Initially identified as Jane Doe by Fliter, she was positively identified as Penn in a news release to the media 9 p.m. Sept. 18 following testing earlier in the day. An autopsy was performed Sept. 19 to determine the cause of death.Penn, who had Alzheimer’s disease, lived in Woodland Terrace at the Oaks Senior Living Community, Salisbury Township. She was last seen Aug. 23.
By Paul Willistein and Deb Galbraith
 

STATE

Senators say property tax #1 complaint

Mark Twain once observed that the only difference between a tax man and taxidermist is that "the taxidermist leaves the skin." That was the sentiment of most of the over 200 people who crammed into Bethlehem Township's meeting room Wednesday night for a town hall on property taxes. The forum was hosted by state senators Lisa Boscola (D-Northampton), Mario Scavello (R-Monroe) and Dave Argall (R-Schuylkill). Each is a co-sponsor of the Property Tax Elimination Act, which was defeated in 2015 when Lt. Governor Mike Stack broke a 24-24 tie to send this reform measure to perdition. But Argall has resurrected the legislation and is conducting town halls statewide to whip up support.All three state senators agreed that the public is clamoring for a change. Photo: It was standing room only at Bethlehem Township’s meeting room as over 200 people cascaded into a town hall on school property tax reform.

By Bernie O’Hare

 

STATE

Child welfare workers: Overworked, under paid

A lengthy report from the state Auditor General on the child welfare system is calling out numerous pitfalls in the relevant agencies that can have deadly results. “In 2016, 46 children died and 79 nearly died in Pennsylvania from abuse and neglect. Of those 125 children, nearly half of their families were already in the child-welfare system. Pennsylvania’s child-welfare system is broken. “This is not hyperbole or exaggeration,” Auditor General Eugene DePasquale said in the report that concluded a yearlong study of the state’s child welfare system.

By Brian Myszkowski

 

MORAVIAN COLLEGE

New shining star on campus

Representatives of Moravian College -- from the president to incoming first-year students -- gathered at the corner of Main and Laurel streets Aug. 20 to take part in the informal opening of the the Sally Breidegam Miskiewicz Center for Health Sciences. Built over the last year, the 55,000-square-foot center will support Moravian’s programs in health-related fields including nursing and public health, among others. Sally Breidegam Miskiewicz was a graduate of Moravian College in the Class of 1994. She was the chairperson and chief executive officer of East Penn Manufacturing in Berks County. She also served on Moravian College’s Board of Trustees from 2008 till her death in an accident in 2014.

Photo: Seen from Monocacy Street, the Center for Health Sciences sits just beyond the Priscilla Payne Hurd Academic Complex (foreground, left) and next to the Collier Hall of Sciences (distance, left). The lawn and walkway offer open space on a fairly busy campus.

By Dennis Glew

 

LEHIGH VALLEY

Memorial Day parade 2018 celebrates state’s musical roots

Washington, D.C., has its National Memorial Day Parade, Philadelphia marks the occasion with Penn’s Landing Waterfront Day, and in 2018 for the first time, Northeast Pennsylvania will observe the holiday with the “The Great Allentown Memorial Day Celebration” on May 27 and 28 at the historic Allentown Fairgrounds.The plans for the annual event were announced at a news conference Aug. 21 by Jeffrey Tapler, president of the board of directors of the Pennsylvania Music Preservation Society (PAMPS), sponsor of the celebration, and Alex Meixner, Grammy Award nominee and nationally acclaimed musician, performer, bandleader, educator and leading advocate of polka music.   Photo: William Allen HS Marching Band tuba players high-five each other after award-winning musician and Lehigh Valley native Alex Meixner compliments their playing. The students had only been playing the tuba for three weeks.

By Carole Gorney

 

CLASSROOM

Partnership provides school supplies

ArtSkills, a local arts and crafts company, for the second year donated hundreds of backpacks filled with fun goodies to the Freemansburg ES student body Sept. 1. Teachers got packages for their rooms, too. ArtSkills worked with The Kids in Need Foundation, a nonprofit whose purpose is to keep kids and teachers alike stocked with school supplies. KINF Executive Director Dave Smith said, “We know that when children and teachers get the tools they need, it creates a more equal learning environment and promotes confidence in the classroom.” Photo: ArtSkills co-owner Bradford Demsky hands a backpack to Ruben Fantauzzi as Marinellys Ibanez receives her own. Both students are fourth graders.

By Nate Jastrzemski

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Pates upend Northampton

Getting a win in East Penn Conference football is a goal every week and that’s what Freedom was able to do in last week’s 26-13 home victory over Northampton. The win pushed Freedom to 3-1 on the season and that was the most important take-away for head coach Jason Roeder.

By Peter Car

Bethlehem Catholic blows by Eagles

It was a test of grit and resiliency on Saturday night for Bethlehem Catholic and Hawks answered against Nazareth in resounding fashion. Trailing 20-13 at halftime against the Blue Eagles, Becahi exploded in the second half, outscoring Nazareth 38-7 en route to a 51-27 victory.

By Peter Car

 

LV FOCUS

Pain awareness month

For Julian Phillips, chronic pain is an everyday fact of life. Nothing in Phillips’ active childhood years in England, where he was born, indicated that he would later be living a life of constant physical agony. September is “Pain Awareness Month” in the United States. Phillips again this year brought the American Chronic Pain Association awareness program to the attention of the board of commissioners in Salisbury Township, where he resides. Township commissioners agreed to allow “Pain Awareness Month” signs to be placed in the township.

By Ed Courrier

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem HCC: Business signage changes approved

Bethlehem HARB: Artefact scores four for four in Sept.

Bethelhem Area SD: Freedom HS’s 50th anniversary Oct. 15

Opinion: Equifax-Life will never be the same

Letter: Bethlehem gift ban still too loose

Lehigh Valley: Family fun at the fair

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

To advertise: Ad staff

Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter