OUR 10TH YEAR OF SERVICE
TO THE CITY OF BETHLEHEM, BETHLEHEM AND HANOVER TOWNSHIPS AND THE BOROUGHS OF FOUNTAIN HILL, FREEMANSBURG AND HELLERTOWN

Phone: 610-625-2121 FAX: 610-625-2126 gtaylor@tnonline.com

Tuesday, April 25, 2017


April 26, 2017

COVER STORY

‘We all have the same concerns’

When I recently asked Bethlehem Police Chief Mark DiLuzio what he would wish for given unlimited resources; he said, “World peace.” The line from the film “Miss Congeniality” was delivered with his signature lilt, a deadpan that somehow conveys an expectation of laughter. DiLuzio is known for throwing groan-inducing remarks into interviews, and that day was no different. We did laugh, admitting we’d both watched the movie recently, but we spent the better part of an hour discussing very real matters for his department; successes and challenges and what he feels will make Bethlehem a safer, closer community. Photo: Police Chief Mark DiLuzio has more than 25 years with the department and is dedicated first and foremost to community policing, which he says makes for a stronger, safer city.

By Nate Jastrzemski

 

SPRING MUSICALS

LV Charter Arts HS presents ‘Hair’

The Lehigh Valley Charter HS for the Arts will present “Hair” at four evening performances from today through Saturday at 7 p.m., and a matinee performance at 2 p.m. on Sunday. “Hair” is a rock musical about the 1960s hippie movement based on the book and lyrics of James Rado and Gerome Ragni, with music by Galt McDermot. The Charter Arts cast of “Hair” is directed by Ashley Tait-Weller, and Neil Chaban is director of music, with Peter Wrenn-Meleck in charge of technical direction. Tickets are $12 for adults and $10 for seniors and students, and are available online at www.CharterArts.org and at the door, 321 E. Third St., if a performance is not sold out. Photo: Soloist Ronny (Ciara Alvarado) and the ‘Tribe’ of hippies perform “Aquarius” during Act 1.

By Dana Grubb

 

SPRING MUSICALS

Liberty HS presents ‘West Side Story’

The popular musical “West Side Story” is being presented by Liberty HS on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday at 7 p.m. in the auditorium at 1115 Linden St. Set in the 1950’s, the story features a rivalry between two gangs in the Upper West Side of New York City during the last days of summer. Influenced by Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet,” the playwright included some tragic consequences in the script. Tickets: lhstheatretix@yahoo.com and 610-865-0615. Photo: Anita (Alyssa Rosario), the girlfriend of gang leader Bernardo (Fahvian Shorey) dances with the Shark girls ensemble. Photo: Anita (Alyssa Rosario), the girlfriend of gang leader Bernardo (Fahvian Shorey) dances with the Shark girls ensemble.

By Tim Gilman

 

PEOPLE

After 43 years, NCC student service coordinator retires

After more than four decades in education, Bethlehem native Virginia Gonzalez had finally come to terms with the idea of retirement. It’s now time to travel, focus on friendships and find personally meaningful projects to occupy her days. She sat with the Press some time ago to reflect on the social evolution of her Southside neighborhood and the city, her career at Northampton Community College, and the ever-changing face of the local college population and the niche schools like NCC fill.

By Nate Jastrzemski


POLITICS
Cartwright faces friendly town hall
When Congressman Charlie Dent faced 400 angry people at Hanover Township Community Center a few weeks ago on a cold and rainy day, it was hard for him to speak more than a few words without being interrupted by catcalls over Trump’s attempt to repeal and replace Obamacare with something that Dent himself refused to support. But the weather and mood were much brighter on April 18, when Congressman Matt Cartwright faced a friendly crowd of about 90 people at Northampton Community College’s Alumni Hall. One of the messages he repeated frequently is that “democracy really works.”
By Bernie O’Hare

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Liberty boys win EPP tennis title

The Liberty Hurricanes boys’ tennis team finished the regular season with a record of 14-0 and are the 2017 East Penn Conference Champions. “I am very happy for the team,” said Hurricane coach Leo Schnalzer. “Prior to the season, I knew we would have very good players, so I can’t take a lot of responsibility for their success. I was there to help and support them, and maybe add to their success.”

By Katie McDonald

 

LV FOCUS

Student poetry project

 To commemorate National Poetry Month in April, the Lehigh Valley Press newspapers and web sites present the 12th annual Student Poetry Project. Students whose poems appear on Page B1 read their poems and were interviewed on the April 17 broadcast of “Lehigh Valley Arts Salon” on Lehigh Valley Community Public Radio Station, WDIY, 88.1, wdiy.org. The Student Poetry Project adjudication committee convened March 21 and read more than 100 poems submitted by students from the Lehigh Valley region. This year, The Press newspapers’ “Student Poetry Project” again received a Keystone professional journalism state award.

By Paul Willistein

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: Council mounts bamboo defense

Bethlehem: Property value error causes temporary budget hold up

Bethlehem: Women’s Club donates to Cops N Kids

Bethlehem Township: Brodhead Road work begins in July

BASD: Moravian scholarship recipients

Fountain Hill: YMCA to manage borough pool this summer

Lehigh Valley: Drug Take Back Daye April 29

Lehigh Valley: Gov. Wolf announces Union Blvd. work

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

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Tuesday, April 18, 2017


April 19, 2017


COVER STORY
Hyacinths mark Moravian Easter dawn service

The Moravian Easter dawn service, which dates back to the city’s founding by the Moravians, was held Sunday at 6 a.m. in Central Moravian Church. According to tradition, the Easter worshipers walked to nearby God’s Acre Cemetery

for an outdoor continuation of the Easter celebration. God’s Acre consists of flat grave markers of the early Moravian Community members in Bethlehem.

By Tim Gilman

 

PEOPLE

Cancer warrior gives back to community

Newhard in the “Ray of Sunshine” room in the Pediatric Cancer Foundation of the Lehigh Valley (PCFLV) offices at the Banana Factory. Recently diagnosed with his fourth relapse, Newhard, a 12-year-old cancer warrior, created 75 Easter bags from donations he collected. The plucky New Tripoli resident distributed them to other pediatric cancer warriors and their siblings at the April 12 event. “A lot of people did a lot for me and I want to give back to the community,” said Newhard. He was also grateful for the help he received from family and friends in putting together the gift baskets. Luchansky and Kresge, from Coplay, lost their four and-one-half-year-old sister Ella Luchansky to neuroblastoma three years ago.

By Ed Courrier

 

COMMUNITY

Eggstravanza

The April 15 Eggstravaganza at College Hill Moravian Church in Bethlehem attracted about 200 children and their families to a variety of special events. The afternoon activities for 3-9 year-olds included arts and crafts, snacks, story-time and a visit by the Easter Bunny. The finale took the children outdoors for the Easter egg hunts, in three age groups, which featured 1,700 candy-filled eggs. The special Easter event for younger children is coordinated by Rev. David C. Meyer and a team of volunteers which include his son, Leo, as the Easter Bunny. Above: The Egg hunt scramble is the finale of the Eggstravaganza on Easter Saturday at College Hill Moravian Church in Bethlehem. 

By Tim Gilman

 

POLITICS

Tax Day rally in Bethlehem

With Tax Day approaching on April 18 this year, Americans in cities across the nation participated in a Tax March April 15 to demand that President Donald Trump release his most recent tax returns. Though no president is required to release his tax income returns, every major party nominee since the 1970s has done so.  In Bethlehem, around 200 people gathered in Payrow Plaza next to Bethlehem City Hall to have their voices heard. The local rally was sponsored by the Bethlehem City Democratic Committee. “The American  people deserve to know what corporations, banks, and foreign investors Donald Trump is beholden to,” said Clyde Thomas, chairman of the committee. Photo: Steve and Barbara Diamond of Bethlehem came to the demonstration in eye-catching, patriotic garb.

By Dorothy and Dennis Glew

 

SPRING MUSICALS

Freedom presents ‘Peter Pan’

“Peter Pan,” a lively musical, was performed at Freedom HS from April 5 through 9. A cast of 42 students worked together to present the popular play, featuring characters Peter Pan, Captain Hook and Wendy. Director Jennifer Wescoe created a fast-moving production with imaginative sets, colorful costumes and remarkable student performances. She was assisted by music director Nancy Shumaker, choreographer Jerri Brown and pit conductor Michael Moran, with mostly student musicians. Peter Pan originated as J.M. Barrie’s 1904 play, and 50 years later, the Broadway musical production won three Tony Awards. Broadway revivals in 1979 and 1990 also received Tony nominations. A remarkable feature of the Freedom “Peter Pan” production are the flying effects provided by ZFX Inc. which outdid Tinkerbell’s fairy dust, used by Peter Pan. Photo: Flying to Neverland with Peter Pan leading the way in a star-filled sky are the Darling family children Wendy (Grace Taylor), Michael (Aaron Rivas) with his teddy bear and John (Joshua Konschnik) from their home in London.

By Tim Gilman

 

CLASSROOM

Cops n Kids reaches Lincoln

Cops ‘n’ Kids Children’s Literacy Program completed yet another fantastic event of giving, this time for the children of Lincoln ES. Students packed the auditorium on the morning of March 31, anticipating a day filled with reading and fun. During the assembly, students learned how the Liberty HS National Honor Society raised over $800 to be used to purchase brand new books for each student at Lincoln. They additionally heard from speakers including Lincoln Principal Benita Draper, and Cops ‘n’ Kids President Beverly Bradley. The  women encouraged the students to keep reading, learning and dreaming, so they can grow up to reach their goals. Bradley led a student pledge, telling students, “as long as you’re dreaming, you’re moving forward.” Photo: Lincoln elementary students listen to Liberty HS National Honor Society volunteers share their hometown, favorite book and biggest dream. Photo: Cops ‘n’ Kids President Beverley Bradley leads the children in a pledge to follow their dreams and to keep reading.

By Alli Poszak


BETHLEHEM TOWNSHIP

Traditions, Green Pond site arguments hear

Developer Traditions of America (TOA) wants to build an active senior community at Green Pond Country Club. What makes this development controversial is its location. It’s adjacent to environmentally sensitive wetlands, in the middle of an Audubon-designated “Important Bird Area” called Green Pond Marsh. Because nearly every Bethlehem Township commissioner has publicly expressed an opinion either for or against the proposal, the board decided to appoint David Brooman, a Norristown-based attorney, as an independent hearing officer to decide whether to grant or deny tentative plan approval. He has conducted several hearings with technical testimony offered by both Traditions of America and “Save Green Pond.” But the April 11 hearing was different. It was a last opportunity for the people to speak. They did. He heard from 29 of the 80 people who packed into the municipal building on an unusually warm April night.

By Bernie O’Hare


 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

‘Canes, Pares off to hot starts

It appears to be a two horse race in the East Penn Conference’s Steel Division, as Liberty (7-1, 4-0) and Freedom (7-0, 4-0) headed into this week in poll position atop the division. With a full slate of games this week, both teams could enter their Saturday showdown (1 p.m. at Liberty) with more at stake than their rivalry.

By Peter Car

 



 

LV FOCUS

Woodland plants bloom quickly

Spring arrived March 20, but some days I wonder if it is really here. We’ve had temperatures vary from the high-30s to some days in the mid-80s. If it weren’t for seeing harbingers of the season such as birds gathering building materials for nests, trees pushing out their leaf buds, ephemeral wildflowers appearing among the old leaves of fall, and male spring peepers calling for mates, I at times would question whether s

By Bud Cole

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: Council approves 1st LERTA expansion reading

Bethlehem: AAUW book sale opens April 20

Lehigh Valley: Female Civil Rights leaders to be honored April 28

Northampton: Cusik strikes out again on car fees

South Bethlehem: Book sale report

Lehigh County: $5 car registration fee considered

Lehigh Valley: Grants available for rural community fire equipment

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

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Tuesday, April 11, 2017


April 12, 2017

COVER STORY

Women stand up for equal pay

In recognition of Equal Pay Day 2017, the YWCA of Bethlehem sponsored an “Un-Happy Hour” at Bethlehem’s Brew Works on April 7. As professional women and an occasional male counterpart stopped by to recognize the gender pay disparity and support efforts to eliminate it, Kristin Oakley, vice chair of the women’s economic empowerment committee, told listeners that white women earn 76 cents for each dollar earned by males, black women 63 cents, and Hispanic women 57 cents. Further complicating the economic issues for women, Oakley pointed out that 47 percent of women in college graduate into the workforce with at least $30,000 in student loan debt, needing six more years than their male counterparts to pay off the debt, thus incurring higher interest costs. This sets them back when it comes to investing in 401Ks, affects credit scores, and delays purchasing homes and financing cars. Essentially, said Oakley, this puts them behind males facing the same economic and life issues. Photo: A group of early arrivals gathers to show support for women’s pay equality.

By Dana Grubb

 

NORTHAMPTON COUNTY

Drug Court celebrates another graduate

Drug overdoses are the leading cause of injury death in the United States. Opioids, both prescription and illicit, are the driving force. Opioid overdoses have quadrupled since 1999. According to the Centers for Disease Control, Pennsylvania experienced a 20.4 percent increase in drug overdose deaths in 2015. But amid these dark clouds, there are rays of sunshine. State Rep. Dan McNeil and the HOPE program have organized numerous town halls to educate the public. In April 2015, Northampton County established a Drug Court to help people overcome their addictions. The court celebrated its third graduate last month with ice cream cake. The graduate’s name is Alysha. She’s a person who has struggled with heroin and who had been in and out of the system since 2010. Photo: Alysha completed an intense four-phase program under the supervision of Stephanie Greene-Wimmer and Judge Craig Dally.

By Bernie O’Hare

 

BETTER LATE THAN NEVER

Southside Valentine party

A Sweethearts’ Party touched the hearts of children and parents, filling an activity room at the Southside Branch of the Bethlehem Area Public Library. The  event coincided with Valentine’s Day which happened to be on a Tuesday, one of the nights the library branch is open. Story-time, crafts, snacks and games kept the children busy during the special program. Tess Blum, the children’s librarian who handles youth services, organized the first-time Valentine’s Day celebration. The Bethlehem Area Public Library Southside branch at 400 Webster St. offers a variety of family-friendly activities. More info at 610-867-7852 and BAPL website. Photo: Tess Blum reads Valentine books to children during a Sweethearts’ Party at the Southside Branch of the Bethlehem Area Public Library. Blum, a Bethlehem resident, is the children’s librarian.

By Tim Gilman

 

COMMUNITY

Annual Bacchanalia remains a crowd pleaser

The air was buzzing with lively chatter while guests waited for the doors to open for the 14th annual Fountain Hill Bacchanalia. The event was held at the Comfort Suites in Bethlehem March 25. There were over 200 tickets sold between individual sales and business sponsors. Tickets were $40 and included a complimentary Bacchanalia wine glass, unlimited food and wine tasting and live entertainment by Doug Hawk and B.D. Lenz. The Bacchanalia, named for the ancient festivals held in honor of the Roman wine god Bacchus, is an opportunity to bring together the local community to raise funds for the Fountain Hill Playground and Recreation Improvement Fund. This year they will be donating $12,000 to the fund from Bacchanalia XIV. Photo: Michael and Jennifer DeLong of Allentown-based Seven Sins of Sugar are attracted to events for good causes.

By Tracy Rice

 

BUSINESS
New senior facility offers all-in-one services

Walking from wide, sterile hallways into the dayroom was like stepping out of the shade into the sun. The cavernous hall was not nearly filled with people, but there was a humming bustle as knots of elderly men and women ate and talked with each other and passing aides. Doris Day rang from a stereo at the front of the room and a scheduled group activity was about to commence. It was just another day at Senior LIFE’s new facility on High Point Boulevard. Senior LIFE, a statewide independent living program, recently moved from Westgate Drive to the industrial park to accommodate its expanding membership and provide improved facilities. Outreach sales trainer Niki Recker provided a tour; halls redolent with nature paintings, three dayrooms, a kitchen, laundry room, and exam rooms and a fully staffed clinic fill the building. Photo:  Staff physician Dr. Peter Baddick catches up with Stephanie T. in one of three dayrooms.

B Nate Jastrzemski

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Start of busy baseball month begins

It may be a slow start to the baseball season for all teams across the Lehigh Valley, but things will heat up this week when the schedule looks to kick into high gear before the Easter weekend hits. With most teams having played three games heading into this week, the dismal March has pushed the schedule back for most teams, giving teams loaded schedules the rest of the month of April. Freedom (3-0) will see the uptick this week with three games in three days, starting on Tuesday with Easton, Wilson and Whitehall and capping the week off on Saturday against Allen.

By Peter Car

 

LV FOCUS

The conversation that matters

Ellen Goodman, Pulitzer-Prize-winning columnist and founder-director of The Conversation Project, will speak on “The Most Important Conversation America Isn’t Having” at the seventh annual Dr. and Mrs. Max Littner Memorial Lecture Series for Bereavement, 7:30 p.m. April 19, Central Moravian Church, Main and Church streets, Bethlehem. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. The lecture is also sponsored by St. Luke’s University Health Network. A career journalist, Goodman worked for Newsweek magazine, the Detroit Free Press, and The Boston Globe. While at the Globe, she began writing her column on social issues that affected American life, and in 1976 it was syndicated, eventually being carried by 450 newspapers. In 1980, a portfolio of her columns received the Pulitzer Prize for commentary.

By Carole Gorney

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: Digital gaming teaches critical math skills

Bethlehem: Five join Museum & Sites board

Bethlehem Township: Commissioners approve $1.8M for center’s repairs

Fountain Hill: Council hears resident concerns

Hanover Township: Township warned and The Green Menace

Northampton County: Egg hunt kicks off holiday period

State: Groups pushing for fair political districts in Pa.

Lehigh Valley: Local Fresh Air committee attends NYC conference

Saucon Valley: Red Out raises $1,300 for Heart Assoc.

Nitchmann: Students contribute to district THON

BAVTS: Students participate in culinary event

Chesterbrook Academy: ‘Souper Bowl’ benefits others

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

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Tuesday, April 4, 2017


April 5, 2017

COVER STORY
Relationships, teamwork and community leadership

Fourteen elementary school children from Fountain Hill were special guests of the historic Hotel Bethlehem recently, and they literally got a first-hand view of the hotel from top to bottom. Starting on the eighth floor with a tour of the Presidential Suite, and making their way to the lower level where a speakeasy once flourished during Prohibition, the students spent the day learning about all the inner workings of the hotel. Photo: Executive Chef Michael Adams spends time in the kitchen with the students, explaining how food is prepared and how the staff work together. An award-winning chef, Adams is a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America. He returned to the Hotel Bethlehem as head chef in 2014.  

By Carole Gorney

 

C
OMMUNITY

Becahi girls team honored at assembly

Bethlehem Catholic girls basketball team won the state championship in Hershey March 23, and were rewarded with accolades in a ceremony in the school auditorium last Wednesday. Above: Team members Hope Brown, Natalie Rhine, Neila Luma, Tessa Zamolyi and Morgan Orloski watch a highlight reel of their season.

By Nate Jastrzesmki

 

BUSINESS

Lit Coffee Roastery and Bakeshop

Co-owner Dan Taylor roasts the coffee beans they import from environmentally sustainable farms in this commercial roaster. The roasted beans are then ground at the front counter. In tribute to folk singer Woody Guthrie’s and Taylor’s business partner, Matt Hengeveld’s own connection to Bethlehem-based “Sing Out!” magazine, their special house blend is called “Bound for Glory.”

By Ed Courrier

 

POLITICS

Dent’s hastily organized town hall well attended

Despite less than a day’s notice, over 400 people braved a downpour and crammed into Hanover Township Community Center March 31 for a town hall with Congressman Charlie Dent (R-15th). The crowd was so huge for the hastily arranged meeting that parking had to be diverted to a nearby church. Photo: Congressman Charlie Dent’s 15th District includes all of Lehigh County, but only pieces of Northampton, Berks, Lebanon and Dauphin counties. Asked about the Trump travel ban, Dent said he thinks there is no real danger from the seven Muslim countries at which the ban was directed. “My concern is Europe,” he said.

By Bernie O‘Hare

 

SPRING MUSICALS

Bethlehem Catholic presents ‘Oklahoma’

Bethlehem Catholic Theatre presents the Richard Rogers and Oscar Hammerstein II collaboration “Oklahoma” as its spring musical. Set in early 20th century Oklahoma, the musical tells the story of a cowboy and a farm girl who fall in love. The over 50-member cast and stage crew is directed by Debbie Acampora, who doubles as choreographer. “Oklahoma” is produced by Diana Tice and Joseph Fink is music director. Performances continue April 7 and 8 at 7 p.m. Tickets are available at http://bit.ly/becatheater or by calling 610-866-0791. Photo: Cowboy Will Parker regales his friends about his experience in Kansas City during the number “Kansas City.”

By Dana Grubb

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Spring sports previews

By Katie McDonald and Peter Car

 

LV FOCUS

Bud’s view: Some of the strongest pets survive

By Bud Cole

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: Frustrated tone at district budget workshop

Bethlehem: Board recognizes student achievements, awards

Bethlehem: Resident hear about Martin Tower asbestos removal

Bethlehem: HCC approve signage for established barbershop

Bethlehem: Benefit supports hospice canine care

Lehigh Valley: PPL reports problems with nightlight

Lehigh Valley: History Day project

Lehigh Valley: Experiencing another culture at Muslim Assoc. openhouse

South Bethlehem: Sands, parking and spring fundraisers

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

To advertise: Ad staff

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