OUR 10TH YEAR OF SERVICE
TO THE CITY OF BETHLEHEM, BETHLEHEM AND HANOVER TOWNSHIPS AND THE BOROUGHS OF FOUNTAIN HILL, FREEMANSBURG AND HELLERTOWN

Phone: 610-625-2121 FAX: 610-625-2126 gtaylor@tnonline.com

Tuesday, May 30, 2017


May 31, 2017

COVER STORY
Remembering those who served

Rehabilitation of the 130-year-old monument cost nearly $30,000 according to city recreation director Jane Persa, with $3,000 in private donations and the balance coming from developers recreation fees received by the City of Bethlehem. It was removed in early 2016 and transported to Conservation Solutions Inc. in Maryland last October to be refurbished. Facchiano Iron Works in Bethlehem fabricated the support structure inside the monument to stabilize it.

By Dana Grubb

 

FOUNTAIN HILL

‘A celebration of the future’

Fountain Hill Shade Tree Commission members Jason Quarry, Mike Klo and Suzanne Poroszlai hold the flag presented by State Forester John Nissen.  “Arbor Day is a different day than any other holiday,” Nissen told the gathering. “Other holidays celebrate the past, but Arbor Day is a celebration of the future.”

By Selena Cintron

 

COMMUNITY

‘Friends’ host ‘April in Paris’ library benefit

The Bethlehem Area Public Library was transformed into a lovely Parisian setting for a fundraiser April 25. The Friends of the Library raised nearly $13,000 for the library. This is the Friends’ third fundraising event and the theme, April in Paris, resonated with the 140 guests. As the guests sipped champagne from glasses etched with the Eiffel Tower for the occasion, they were treated to mouth-watering crepes from Cachette, sumptuous hors d’oeuvres from Apollo Grill, and a delicious selection of cheese from The Cheese Shop at Seasons. A signature French martini made with vodka, Chambord (black raspberry liqueur) and pineapple juice was also enjoyed. Photo: Touchstone Theatre mime Joe Ferraro with Tom Wendahl and Tess Blum. Ferrraro slipped silently in and among the guests, creating a shared sense of camaraderie among the attendees.

 


CLASSROOM

A celebration of excellence

Eighteen vocational students were honored at the Bridges Foundation’s Celebration of Excellence ceremony at the Bethlehem Area Vocational-Technical School May 4. The high-achievers were chosen from 60 applicants for scholarships ranging from $500 to $5,000.  

Photo: Bridges honorees (bottom row) Brooke Adams, Alyssa Trudniak, Mackenzie Strunk, Kayla Marsdale, Kayla Hart, (top) Andrew Sottilare, Dawson Silfies, Judson Freidl, Kevin Michels, Olvin Espinosa, Ruth Sharga, Genna Wetzel, Alexandra DaRoja, Ouhua Yan, Tyrus Bahrman, Eric Hernandez and Jason Zimmerman.

By Ed Courrier

 

CLASSROOM

Arbor Day at Marvine ES

Tatianna Maldonado shows off the Sour Patch candy treat she got during the tree climbing course. Professional climber John Lascelle of Joshua Tree seems amused by the fourth grader’s reaction during her descent. The children were awarded with candy during the supervised tree climbing.

By Tim Gilman

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Rachel Tanczos takes 3rd at States

Bethlehem Catholic thrower Rachel Tanczos won a third place state medal in discus at the PIAA State Class 3A Track and Field Championships on Saturday at Shippensburg University.“I was thinking it would be nice to get in the 140’s, but I was happy,” Tanczos said. “It was a little tricky because it was raining, and we had to wipe our feet off before every throw, but it was something we all had to work against.” Tanczos threw a 138-7 at states and a 144-9 at districts.

By Katie McDonald

 

LV FOCUS

Shakespeare for everyone

The Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival (PSF), with its Main Stage Theatre production of “Evita” opening June 14, bodes to be bigger and better than ever for its 26th season. Already, the 2017 season has set a record. PSF set a new one-day sales record Feb. 15, opening day of single-ticket sales for the summer 2017 season. In one day, 938 tickets were sold for a more than $43,000 total. That’s a 64 percent increase, compared to the first day of single ticket sales in 2016, the Festival’s record-breaking 25th anniversary season.

By Paul Willistein

 

OTHER STORIES

Lehigh Valley: Officials warn of dangerous new drugs in area

Fountain Hill: Community pool to open June 10

Bethlehem: UGI seeks new natural gas tower

Bethlehem: Sands sale a no go

Bethlehem: Book sales top $29,000 for the year

Bethlehem: Southside businesses can expand

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

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Tuesday, May 23, 2017


May 24, 2017

COVER STORY

Slow day at the polls

Voter turnout for last week’s Primary was about 14 percent, according to Northampton County election officials. Photo: Malvina Kramm, an election volunteer for Jon B. Whittington, candidate for district judge, finds lots of time to knit. Kramm said she was making booties for gifts.

By Tim Gilman

 

PEOPLE

Negron lauded during luncheon

She learned the value of community service from her parents growing up the youngest of 11 children in Puerto Rico. Her father was a Rotarian, so Olga Negron learned in elementary school what an agenda was and how to make a motion. Today she is a city council member, and May 10 she received the Lehigh Valley Business Community Achievement Award at a luncheon for several local “Women of Influence.”

By Michelle Meeh

 

COMMUNITY

Prom Dress Day a popular fit

he 10th annual Bethlehem YWCA Prom Dress Day attracted about 200 girls from 35 public and private high schools March 25 to the State Theatre in Easton. A modest $10 ticket offered a choice from more than 1,000 gently used, donated and cleaned dresses. Prom accessories like shoes and costume jewelry were also available. Mothers and other family members accompanied the student prom-goers to the popular event. Volunteers from the YWCA and the Lehigh Valley community provided assistance at the crowded and well-organized Saturday event. Photo: State Theatre’s sign welcomes attendees to the YWCA Bethlehem Prom Dress Day on March 25 in Easton. The historic theatrical sign was lighted all day for the popular event which is hosted by the State Theatre.

By Tim Gilman

 

MAIN STREET

Downtown on Mother’s Day

The sun came out on Mother’s Day and attracted smiling visitors to Main Street in downtown Bethlehem for the second day of the Fine Art and Craft Show. The Bethlehem Fine Arts Commission’s 52nd annual juried show presented the work of approximately 80 artists and artisans. Photo: Nancy Young, a Moravian Village of Bethlehem resident, and her daughter Kari Gearhart from Ambler examine Grateful Gathers Glass artwork during the Bethlehem Fine Art and Craft Show on Mother’s Day. Mrs. Young said her daughter visits regularly on Mother’s Day and they attend the show. Glass artist Danny Polk Jr. of Whitehall is a newcomer to the show.

By Tim Gilman

 

SCOUTREACH

Cub Scout speedsters

The Scoutreach Pinewood Derby featured 101 entries in the Northeast MS gymnasium April 8. The Cub Scouts build their own cars from kits with a block of pine, plastic wheels and metal axles. The boys like to customize their entries with paint and decorations. The annual event is for 6-10-year-old scouts from Bethlehem and Allentown. The Urban Scoutreach Program helps ensure that scouting is available to all youngsters regardless of economic ability, and provides a safe environment with help from teachers and volunteer adults. The program is part of the Boy Scouts of America. Photo: Jimmy J. Torres, Scoutreach district director, congratulates the fastest racers in the derby: Matthew Neuman (third place) of Pack 102 at Sheridan ES in Allentown, Joseph Templeton (first) of Pack 397 at Holy Infancy School in Bethlehem and Averic Teague Padilla (second) of Pack 391 at Lincoln ES in Bethlehem. Additional awards were also presented in a variety of categories.

By Tim Gilman

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

District 11 Track and Field

Tanczos sets D11 discuss mark

LHS’ Jackie Arthur take first in shot

Liberty’s Sahaydak wins gold in 800

By Katie McDonald

 

LV FOCUS

Both sides now

It’s the Yin and Yang of Lehigh Valley summer theater.It’s polar opposites on the Broadway musical spectrum. It’s Muhlenberg Summer Music Theatre (MSMT). This year, MSMT again is staging the radical and new, and the tried and true, in the American musical theater canon. For its 37th season, MSMT presents the revolutionary rock musical “Hair,” June 14 - July 2, and the classic musical, “My Fair Lady,” July 12 - 30. The family children’s show is a really big show, “Wild,” a circus performance, June 28 - July 29.

By PaulWillistein

 

OTHER STORIES

BASD: District will see 2017-18 tax increase

Bethlehem: City Council honors 3 property owners

Bethlehem: PPL supports YWCA’s TechGYRLZ program

Election: Unofficial results from Lehigh, Northampton counties

Bethlehem Township: Developer to pay for 3rd of road work

Bethlehem HARB: ‘Bone Appetit’ sign approved

HanoverTownship: Rt. 512 Turkey Hill to remain dry

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

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Thursday, May 18, 2017


May 17, 2017

COVER STORY

Penn State men’s mile strut

An annual event motivated nearly 35 men at the Penn State Lehigh Valley campus to hit the pavement in hot red high heels. “Walk a Mile in Her Shoes” is an event in support of women and against sexual assault, violence  and abuse. RISE, Response in Sexual Exploitation, is a campus club which hosts the yearly event that took place April 24. Photo: Penn State Lehigh Valley students lined up to get ready for the walk. Many participants chose to sport socks and heels in the interest of comfort.

By Allizon Poczak

 

AT THE SANDS

‘Transforming the lives of students’

Emeril Lagasse, New Orleans celebrity chef and restauranteur, will be the headliner at the eighth annual Lehigh Valley Food & Wine Festival at the Sands Event Center in South Bethlehem, June 2-4. The owner of three restaurants at Sands Bethlehem, Lagasse will kick off  the event on Friday, June 2 at 2 p.m. with a demonstration of his world-renowned culinary skill. The chef will also announce the names of the six students from Northampton Community College’s Culinary and Hospitality Management program who have won the highly competitive, all-expense-paid externships to train in Lagasse’s New Orleans kitchens. Photo: Northampton Community College President Mark Erickson, speaking at a news conference, said culinary students from NCC are involved in every aspect of the Food & Wine Festival.  “Cooking alongside the region’s best chefs and Emeril, hospitality students [are] learning what it takes to pull off an event of this magnitude.”

By Carole Gorney

 

COMMUNITY

Rotarians work together to reduce hunger

Five area Rotary Clubs joined forces March 11 to help reduce hunger in the Lehigh Valley as they set up a production line operation in Moravian College’s Haupert Union Building. Over 100  Rotarians from the Bethlehem, Morning Star, Easton, Nazareth and Saucon clubs packed rice and bean and apple cinnamon oatmeal meals for distribution to area food banks.Packing 20,000 dry meals in several shifts, the effort marked the first time that all five clubs in Rotary District 7430 had partnered on a community service project. Photo: Presidents of the five local Rotary Clubs comprising Rotary District 7430 participated in the packing event: George Morrison from Saucon Rotary; Brian Hartlaub from Nazareth Rotary; Sharon Fontana from Morning Star Rotary; R.C. Smith from Easton Rotary; and Gail Evans from Bethlehem Rotary.

By Dana Grubb

 

HANOVER TOWNSHIP

Park dedicated to first responders

Most of the time, they are taken for granted. Sometimes they are maligned. But when you need them, they come without hesitation. These are our nation’s first responders. Our police officers, firefighters, emergency medical and management personnel. In their honor, Hanover Township dedicated First Responders Park on Airport Road Saturday, April 28. “Thank you, for turning towards things that most people run from,” said Hanover Township Supervisor Michael Prendeville, who conceived the idea of naming this park after them. As he spoke, sirens wailed in the distance as first responders elsewhere drilled for an airport disaster that hopefully will never occur. Photo: First Responders Park is the product of the efforts of, from left to right, Supervisors John Diacogiannis, Michael Prendeville, Mark Tanczos and Jack Nagle, as well as Manager Jay Finnigan. Supervisor Steve Salvesen was unable to attend.

By Bernie O’Hare

 

MORAVIAN COLLEGE



Media tours new high-tech science building

Anyone passing Moravian College’s main campus has noticed the quick rise of a huge new building. Celebrating the near-completion of the Sally Breidegam Maiksiewicz Center for Health Sciences April 13, the college invited media to take a tour before the $23 million facility opens in June. Photo: Workers secure the glass atrium atop the corner of the health sciences building. The tower features a furnished study area on each floor, the top unofficially called the No-Shoes Lounge, from which the light of an eight-foot, 500-pound glass Moravian star will shine.

By Nate Jastrzemski

 

COPS ‘N KIDS

An educational celebration

The Cops ‘n’ Kid’s Literacy Program enjoyed its 11th annual Celebration of Reading … and the Arts and Sciences at the Northampton Community College Fowler Family South Side Center April 22. The events kicked off at 10:30 a.m. with a small parade of the Liberty HS bagpipers, Broughal MS Marching Band, and the City of Bethlehem Mounted Police Unit. The musical entertainment lasted until 3 p.m., continuing every half-hour under the outdoor performance venue and on the fourth, fifth, and sixth floors in the NCC Fowler Center. Photo: Larry Sceurman, storyteller and member of the Lehigh Valley Storytelling Guild, captivates children during his presentation, “Tales, Laughs…and a bit of Magic.”

By Allison Poczak

 

GOV. WOLF ELEMENTARY

Mommy’s Market marks 4th year

It was a great time to get some bargains at the Governor Wolf ES’s annual Mommy Market.

Vendors selling used and new goods rented space and/or tables in the school cafeteria/gym, as well as in the corridor outside the gym. They were able to set up their merchandise on Friday evening. The sale ran from 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, Feb. 25. Merchandise included toys and games, clothing for children and adults, household items, plants, and decorative objects. Business was brisk. Outside the gym, coffee, tea and baked goods were on sale. Proceeds from the sale of refreshments, as well as the rental of tables, benefit programs of the Governor Wolf PTA. Photo: House for sale! In addition to clothing, Robin Hojnocki of Bethlehem was selling a beautiful doll house built by her grandfather. The house was originally wired for lights.

By Dorothy and Dennis Glew

 

OPINION

Fire arms do not belong in the hands of school teachers, personnel

The Pennsylvania Senate Education Committee recently approved Senate Bill 383, sponsored by Sen. Don White, R-41st, of Indiana County. This bill, which would allow school directors to establish a policy for allowing personnel access to firearms in school buildings or on school grounds, would amend the Public School Code of 1949. Senate Bill 383, which passed the committee with a 9-3 vote, will now go to the full Senate for final approval. A 2014 Council of State Government Justice Center article titled, “Arming Teachers and K-12 School Staff: A Snapshot of Legislative Action” states: “Prior to 2013 state legislative sessions, the National Conference of State Legislatures was not aware of any state laws that specifically authorized teachers or other school staff to carry firearms on K-12 school campuses.”

By Susan Bryant

Illustration by Ed Courrier

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Double the fun

Liberty’s number one doubles team of Dan Lynn and Louis Gruber became District 11 doubles tennis champions after winning their match against Hurricane teammates Luke Conrad and David Lynn 6-4, 6-1 last Friday at Winning Touch in Allentown. “It feels great,” said Dan Lynn. “We’re a good combination, and we gelled. Louis was great, and he always finds a way to make the shot.” Accustomed to playing more singles than doubles, Lynn and Gruber had to play with a different strategy.

By Katie McDonald

 

LV FOCUS

Humming along with the hummingbird

Spring has definitely sprung with birds coming and going. Many bird species visit for a specific period of time each year. The slate-colored juncos arrive in November, stay for the winter and head north in April. The juncos leave about the same time as when the ruby-throated hummingbirds come from the south to spend spring, summer and early fall here. The final day we saw juncos in our yard was April 25. White-throated sparrows are also winter visitors that head north in early spring.

By Bud Cole

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem:  School district adopts new core reading program

Opinion: Demand facts; support real news

Lehigh Valley: LVHN, VA agreement expands Veterans Choice

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

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Tuesday, May 9, 2017


May 10, 2017

COVER STORY

A-B-E among safest areas for kids

The Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton metropolitan area is the 17th safest city for children in the United States, according to a detailed statistical analysis conducted by consumer research company ValuePenguin. Barnstable Town, Mass., ranked first as the safest city, followed closely by Trenton, N. J. The study analyzed 200 cities or statistical metropolitan areas according to 18 key points related to safety, schools and community. Safety factors that were considered included rates of violent crimes and burglaries and the presence of police officers. Schools were evaluated on the basis of enrollments, preschool programs, class sizes and graduation rates. Community characteristics were judged according to the percentage of poverty, availability of health insurance, and access to child care, libraries and cultural and recreation centers. 

By Carole Gorney

 

ALTRUSIM AWARDS

A selfless concern for others

Five  area high school students recently received the Travelers Protective Association of America’s Altruism Award, which recognizes those who demonstrate a selfless concern for the wellbeing of others. The awards were presented April 6 at Northampton Memorial Community Center in Northampton. Photo: TPA’s Post L President Dale Stephens, guest speaker Northampton County Court of Common Pleas Judge Samuel P. Murray, Liberty HS senior Liam Mulligan and Liberty faculty member Jennifer Chomo.

By Stephanie Rephum

 

PEOPLE

Eclectic Performing Arts Company

Two years ago, three theater majors at Lehigh Valley Charter HS for the Arts wanted to explore more creative outlets, craving the art of theater, and banded together to found a business of their own. Now, Eclectic Performing Arts Company, a theater company run exclusively by high school students, amasses more productions than its founders could have ever anticipated. Photo: Members of Eclectic Performing Arts Company practice for upcoming performances. “Hazelwood Jr. High” will be performed at the Unicorn Theatre on May 12 and May 13 at 7 p.m., and “Dog Sees God: Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead” performs at Touchstone Theatre May 20 at 7 p.m. and May 21 at 3 p.m. Tickets for both shows can be reserved by emailing eclecticperformingarts@gmail.com.

By Kiran Pandey

 

SOUTH BETHLEHEM

Local designers create new bike racks

From a Bethlehem resident’s tribute to the Bethlehem Steel Corp. to a coffee bar designed just for bicyclists, the city of Bethlehem will come alive this summer with seven vibrant new bike racks installed throughout the Southside. The functional yet highly artistic racks were selected from the numerous entries received by the City of Bethlehem and ArtsQuest as part of the Artist Designed Bike Rack Project, a new community arts project designed to bring additional public art to the SouthSide while encouraging people to bike, shop and dine on the Southside.

 

S
PRING MUSICALS

Northeast MS presents ‘TheMusic Man Jr.’

Northeast Middle School’s Theater Company presented Meredith Willson’s “The Music Man” junior version in two performances March 2 and 4 in the school auditorium. Based on a story by Willson and Franklin Lacey, “The Music Man” centers around a slick music salesman who scams communities into purchasing instruments and uniforms with the promise of creating a children’s band. Falling in love with the town music teacher and librarian, he risks being exposed. The nearly 90-member cast and stage crew were directed by Natalie Parker who was assisted by Barbara Fleck as choreographer, Denise Parker on music direction, Connie Klose on stage management and set design, Sarah Thomas on costume design and Justin Amann as technical director. Photo: Harold Hill (Samuel Graybeal) tries to convince the townspeople of River City that a new pool table at the Pool Hall is trouble in River City in the number “Ya Got Trouble.”

By Dana Grubb

 

CLASSROOM

Empowering future female scientists

Young girls from Marvine ES experienced a unique program this semester promoting STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). Tech Gyrls is a program hosted by the YWCA, where girls in fourth and fifith grades get to learn robotics by building and programming their own robots to move around the room. In addition to robotics, they learned about great women in the STEM field and gave presentations to their friends and families about those women. A total of nine girls participated in Tech Gyrls, and their presentations took place April 12 after school. Photo: Grace Heidelberger, an engineering student from Lehigh University. and Karen Wyant, the Tech Gyrls coordinator, with the Marvine students who participated in the program.

By Alli Poczak

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Hurricane boys when District XI tennis title

Liberty High School’s boys’ tennis coach Leo Schnalzer described the Hurricanes’ clinching the District XI Class AAA championship like this: “I sort of knew the bus was coming. I waited on the corner, they opened the door, and I got on,” after Liberty defeated Nazareth 3-2 last Thursday at Lehigh University. “It feels great for me, but I look at it more as the kids have experienced it and will be able to talk about it for the rest of their lives,” Schnalzer said.

By Katie McDonald

 

LV FOCUS

Bach reimagined

In the 34 years that Greg Funfgeld has been artistic director and conductor of the Bach Choir of Bethlehem, he’s found new ways to showcase the music of Johann Sebastian Bach, the Leipzig cantor whose music, you might say, “baroque” through to lay the foundation for classical music. “We’re always thinking about how we want to present Bach’s music and how to engage and how to intrigue the listener,” Funfgeld says. The 110th Bethlehem Bach Festival, May 13, 14 and May 19, 20, with the Bach Choir of Bethlehem, Festival Orchestra and world-renowned soloists, is billed as a celebration of the human voice, “the organ of the soul.”

By Paul Willistein

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: Council approves state ethics training

Bethlehem: School board recognizes exceptional students, faculty, staff

Bethlehem: Spring book sale opens May 17

Lehigh County: Drug collection results

Lehigh Valley: Primary election candidates

Northampton County: Gracedale Foundation accepts contributions

Hanover Township: Restaurant, bar license for Turkey Hill?

Lehigh Valley: Dr. J. Robert Lovett, CASA honored with Donley Awards

South Bethlehem: Lehigh hosts annual ‘Spring Fling’ for families

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

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The Bethlehem Press online

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Tuesday, May 2, 2017


May 3, 2017

COVER STORY

Lady Bug, Lady Bug

Students at the Chesterbrook Academy Preschool have been learning about the important roles that bugs play in the environment, so it made sense that on Earth Day they would participate in a ladybug release for the fifth year in a row. The overcast misty weather was perfect for the release, Principal Michele Somishka said as she did the honors, cutting open a shipping bag containing 1,500 ladybugs. Photo: Chesterbrook Academy preschooler Evie giggles as a ladybug walks up her arm.

By Dana Grubb

 

WOMEN & TEENS OF THE YEAR

YWCA launches ‘If Not Now When’

YWCA Bethlehem and Title Sponsor Capital BlueCross celebrated the volunteer achievements of local women and teens at the 42nd annual Women & Teens of the Year Award Ceremony April 4 at the event center at Blue. YWCA Bethlehem Executive Director Stephanie Hnatiw welcomed the 175 attendees who were gathered to honor this year’s nine award recipients. Hnatiw congratulated the awardees, telling them, “You embody everything that the YWCA [Bethlehem] has stood for the past 90 years.”  Photo: YWCA Bethlehem’s 2017 Women of the Year are Tina Hasselbusch, Trish Dilg, Corinne Goodwin (Mission Award), Darlene Pors and Anne Baum (Golden Laurel Award)

Courtesy YWCA Bethlehem

 

LEHIGH UNIVERSITY

How the country’s organized

There has been a dramatic shift in this country in the past couple of decades toward more people being single, and if and when they marry, marrying at a much later age. But when journalist Rebecca Traister began studying this trend, she found there have been large numbers of single women at periods in the past, and they have often had a profound impact on social change. Traister, the author of the new book, “All the Single Women: Unmarried Women and the Rise of an Independent Nation,” spoke to about 150 people at Lehigh University March 30, a talk sponsored by the Friends of the Lehigh University Libraries. Traister, who described herself as an alumna of the Lehigh University daycare center, is the daughter of a Lehigh English professor emeritus, Barbara Traister.

By Julia Swan

 

SPRING MUSICALS

Notre Dame presents ‘Curtains’

There was murder afoot on the stage at Notre Dame HS with “Curtains,” a play-within-a-play musical comedy from April 20 through 22.  In the play, set in 1959, Lt. Frank Cioffi, a Boston police detective and theater fan, investigates the opening night demise of the untalented leading lady of the musical “Robbin’ Hood of the Old West.” While trying to solve the mysterious deaths of additional cast and crew members, the lonely gumshoe attempts to save the day and the play, as well as find love. This musical whodunit was director Rody Gilkeson’s 18th Notre Dame spring production. His wife, Elizabeth Marsh-Gilkeson, served as musical director and costume designer. Assisting were choreographer Meghan Koehler, stage manager and technical director Sara Faubert, and set designers Brett Oliveira and Taylor Van Kooten. Photo: Cast and crew gather around Lt. Frank Cioffi (Sam Durigon) as he reads threatening notes that had been sent to the production company.

By Ed Courrier

 

CENTRAL MORAVIAN CHURCH

Addressing the end of life

“We need to change the way the people we love are dying,” Pulitzer-Prize winning columnist and Conversation Project founder Ellen Goodman told an attentive audience in Bethlehem during her presentation on “The Most Important Conversation America Isn’t Having,” sponsored by the Dr. and Mrs. Max Littner Memorial Lecture Series and St. Luke’s University Health Network. Speaking at Central Moravian Church in Bethlehem, Goodman said the conversation she is talking about is how our loved ones want to live the last years of their lives, what kind of medical care they want, and who should make the decisions for them if they can’t. 

By Carole Gorney

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Lynn takes silver medal

Liberty senior Dan Lynn won the silver medal at the District 11 Class 3A Singles Tennis Tournament after competing against Nazareth’s Ben Tauber who won the finals match 6-3, 6-4 on Friday at Winning Touch in Allentown. “Of course, I wanted gold, but it’s a good feeling, silver,” said Lynn. “I just wanted to come in and play my game, go for his backhand, and come to the net.” In the first set, three games went to deuce, and in the seventh game, Lynn was picking up momentum, scoring three big points, one of which was a crosscourt at the net.

By Katie McDonald

 

LV FOCUS

Better Angels – 20th anniversary edition

William Sanders saw the writing on the wall. Or, more accurately, he saw the poster on the wall. “I was trying to think of a play for the end of season. Somebody else was doing one play. And we couldn’t get the rights to another. “And I was sitting in my office. I looked at the poster of ‘Angels in America.’ I realized it would be the 20th anniversary of Civic’s production. I thought, ‘Why don’t we do that?’”

By Paul Willistein

 

OTHER STORIES

Editorial: Obscene, profane and vulgar

Bethlehem: Zoners approve Liden swim school

Bethlehem: Mural, public arts projects reviewed

Bethlehem: ‘Boutique’ preparations under way

Bethlehem AVTS: Students take top auto prize

Northampton County: Grand jury recommends criminal charge in day care death

Northampton County: May is Lyme disease prevention month

Northampton County: Controller wants to clamp down on county travel expenses

Lehigh Valley: Opioid abuse costs businesses millions

Steelstacks: ‘The Big Dream’

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

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The Bethlehem Press online

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