OUR 10TH YEAR OF SERVICE
TO THE CITY OF BETHLEHEM, BETHLEHEM AND HANOVER TOWNSHIPS AND THE BOROUGHS OF FOUNTAIN HILL, FREEMANSBURG AND HELLERTOWN

Phone: 610-625-2121 FAX: 610-625-2126 gtaylor@tnonline.com

Tuesday, August 4, 2015

August 5, 2015
COVER STORY
  Season’s change: Bethlehem loses
  longtime kings of summer and winter
Musikfest and Christmas are two of the most exciting and wholly Bethlehem events each year for many people. And each year those events, their roots delving deeply into the public consciousness, were intertwined with the two men who personified them. Last week, the city lost “Jolly” Joe Timmer, king of the Polka and spirit of Musikfest, and Charles “Bud” Berge, who embodied St. Nicholas for more than two decades at the Yuletide Christkindlmarkt. Top: “Jolly” Joe Timmer, king of the polka and spirit of Musikfest. Bottom: Charles “Bud” Berge brought Christmas joy to many children.
By Nate Jastrzemski


  That was ‘Jolly’ Joe
I am writing about “Jolly” Joe Timmer not only because he was the King of Polka, or the owner and general manager of WGPA, or the producer and host of The “Jolly” Joe Timmer Show on television, but because that larger-than-life personality we saw and heard was, in reality, a person who looked out for the little guy, the underdog.
Yes, I was one of them, but there were many. Photo: Some of the WGPA staff broadcasting live from Festplatz at Musikfest 2006: (front) Mark Thomas, Jarret Brown (back) Bob Kauffman, Jolly Joe Timmer, Katie McDonald.
By Katie McDonald


BETHLEHEM
  Getting ready for Musikfest
A scaffolding tower for Musikfest’s Sands Steel Stage at PNC Plaza is assembled by the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees before the Preview Night of Musikfest 2015. The IATSE local 200, based in Bethlehem, is responsible for erecting Musikfest’s South Bethlehem major concert ticketed stage and the two towers which contain the sound system and hold up the venue’s roof. An assembly crew of some 30 IATSE stagehands was on hand Friday. This year’s Preview Night, Aug. 6, features Duran Duran which returns to Musikfest for the first time in 15 years.
By Tim Gilman


ANOTHER VIEW
  Ed’s World
By Ed Courrier


SCHOOL
  Carnival benefits school activities
Students, parents, school staff and neighbors of Nitschmann MS enjoyed an inaugural school and community carnival this past spring, one filled with traditional fun activities like a dunking booth, cake walk, bean bag toss, football throw, 50/50 raffle, music, food, refreshments and vendors. School resource officer Sean Conley said monies raised by the event would be used to support students participating in the Junior Police Academy Program and other school activities such as field trips. Conley, who said the original goal was to raise $2,000, later reported proceeds nearly double that amount.
By Dana Grubb

BETHLEHEM SPORTS
  Liberty HS Athletes of the Year
    • Kaylin West: The engine for Liberty
    • Lou Csaszar: A force to be reckoned with
By Pete Car and Kathy McDonald

LEHIGH VALLEY FOCUS
  Musikfest preview
Musikfest, which takes place in Downtown Bethlehem’s Historic District and Southside Bethlehem’s SteelStacks, has 325-plus artists  performing for its 32nd year, Aug. 7 - 16, Bethlehem. The festival has free music on 15 of its 16 stages, with 550 free music and art performances, the most in the event’s history.

OTHER STORIES
Lehigh Valley: Casey hopes to fill WIC gap
State: Kise to head state group
Bethlehem: Beating the heat
Bethlehem: Camp Cadet

WEEKLY FEATURES
Around town community calendar
Police logs
Area obituaries
Center for Animal Health and Welfare
Volunteers
Student profiles
High school news reports

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Tuesday, July 28, 2015


July 29, 2015

COVER STORY
  Let’s go for a bike hike
It didn’t sound that monumental at first. All you had to do was get on a bicycle and ride 335 miles over abandoned rail lines and canal towpaths from Pittsburgh to Washington in nine days. But our confidence became tainted slightly as the game plan details unfolded. Starting at Pittsburgh’s Point, a magnificent water fountain, was easy enough. Lots of people were walking around. One of them volunteered to take a photo which quickly went up on Facebook. Photo: Once bustling with mules hauling canal boats, the towpaths now mirror the colors and sounds of nature. Allan J. Wilkins (left) is a former journalist and semi-retired IT systems analyst, residing in Bethlehem. Len Barcousky is a former Lehigh Valley journalist, now with The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. They have been friends for almost 35 years.
By Allan Wilkin


HISTORIC BETHLEHEM
  A berry good time
The 29th annual Blueberry Festival July 18 and 19 at the historic Burnside Plantation in Bethlehem offered visitors of all ages  music, family activities, crafts, demonstrations and assorted food. Photo: The John Sebastion Goundie booth features local beer historian Chris Bowen and his assistant Adam Kolman. The 19th century brewers in period clothing re-enact the beer making process for John Halko and his two sons, Michael and John, who live within walking distance of the festival.
By Tim Gilman


COMMUNITY
  'Service brings out the best in us‘
Rebecca Neafcy views life from a different perspective after working side-by-side with Nicaraguan families during an April Thrivent Builds Worldwide trip. Rebecca Neafcy fully expected to work hard building homes and changing the lives of Nicaraguan families. While these expectations were met, it came as a surprise that she was also personally and strongly impacted by the experience. Photo: Rebecca Neafcy helped build a community of homes for families in Nicaragua. Neafcy traveled to Central America in mid-April as part of a Thrivent Builds with Habitat for Humanity trip.
Contributed story

BETHLEHEM HISTORY
  R.F. Sell: Innovative sportsman
If the crowds pouring into Liberty HS Stadium an hour and a half before game-time gave any indication of the level of success big-time sporting events would receive in the Lehigh Valley, the results were going to be huge. Professional football made its debut in Bethlehem on Sept. 19, 1945 before a capacity house of 20,000 gridiron enthusiasts.
By Jason Rehm


CLASSROOM
  Learning world cultures through sports
James Buchanan ES students had a chance to celebrate diversity near the end of the school year by participating in a Sports Fest that featured games indigenous to other cultures. Field hockey (Scotland), lacrosse (Native American), hurling (Ireland) and cricket (India) were featured as students learned from participants who play each. Guidance counselor Maryann Kearns said she hoped the elementary students would “learn about other cultures and develop respect for each by participating in the not so well known and unique athletics.” Third and fourth graders participated as fifth grade videographers recorded the event for a later presentation. Photo: Coach Dave explains to James Buchanan students that hurling is 3,000 years old and that it is Ireland’s national sport.
By Dana Grubb


PBS39
  Academy inspires future journalists
If she had to choose one word to describe PBS39’s Media Academy, camp director Carly Dontas would choose “intensive.” Funded by a grant from the Lehigh Valley Business/Education Partnership, the camp was held at the PBS39 public media and education center at 839 Sesame Place on the SteelStacks campus. Although it only ran from June 15 through 19, the hours between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. were packed with different activities focused on the business of broadcast journalism. Photo: On the final day of the camp, students, parents and employees watch the finished video resumes in the studio. Camp participants were awarded certificates to conclude the final day of the Media Academy.
By Katya Hrichak

BETHLEHEM SPORTS
  Bethlehem Catholic Athletes of the year
• Michael McDaniel quieted BC doubters
• Kalista Walters worked hard to be the best
By Peter Car and Katie McDonald

LEHIGH VALLEY FOCUS
  Jerry Blavat, ‘The Geator,’ holds court in Bethlehem
He may not have been “America’s oldest teen-ager.” That would have been Dick Clark. He may not have been one of WAEB’s “Good Guys.” That would have included Gene Kaye whose “Notre Dame Bandstand” concerts brought pop stars of the day to the Lehigh Valley during the 1960s’ AM radio heyday. He is “The Geator With The Heator,” “The Big Boss With The Hot Sauce.” That would be Jerry Blavat, whose “The Discophonic Scene” (1965-’67), a teen dance show on Philadelphia’s WCAU-TV, had quite a following in the Lehigh and Delaware valleys.
By Paul Willistein


OTHER STORIES
Bethlehem Township: Board battles water issue
Bethelehem Township: Residents seek relief from invasion bamboo
Bethlehem: Ramadan
Bethlehem: Zoners approve new tech center
Bethlehem: Council approves zoned hauling program
Bethlehem: State mayors gather
Bethlehem: Head Start gets PNC grant
Lehigh Valley: Volunteer Center hosts networking event
Lehigh Valley: LANTA to discuss fare increase
Lehigh County: New security for domestic violence victims available
National: Sen. Casey seeks stronger campus safety
West Bethlehem: A yard sale tradition continues

WEEKLY FEATURES
Around town community calendar
Police logs
Area obituaries
Center for Animal Health and Welfare
Volunteers
Student profiles
High school news reports

The Bethlehem Press online
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To subscribe: New start
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Tuesday, July 21, 2015


July 22, 2015

COVER STORY
  Heroin addition: A growing epidemic – Part 2
In the late 1880s, the modification of natural substances in pharmacological sciences was important work. Pneumonia and tuberculosis were then the leading causes of death worldwide, and in an effort to alleviate the suffering of so many sick and wasting people, Germany’s Bayer Corporation introduced a fast-acting painkiller it called “heroin.”
   • Signs of addiction
   • Getting help locally
By Nate Jastrzemski, Chris Parker and Katya Krichak


SOUTH BETHLEHEM
  Lynn Avenue bridge closed
Lynn Avenue has been closed from Route 412 to Sixth Street as the South Bethlehem roadway undergoes surface renovation and related work by PennDOT. A detour for local vehicles has been posted in the area. According to the Bethlehem Department of Public Works, the city  is planning to demolish the antiquated and rusty bridge structure “likely, late this year.” The construction of a new and wider bridge is scheduled to start in the early spring of 2016. The completion of the bridge project and reopening of Lynn Avenue is expected to follow in the fall of the same year in time for the busy holiday season in the Christmas City, USA. The present 1925 truss bridge is listed on Bridgehunter.com as a “historical and notable bridge of the United States.”
By Tim Gilman


COMMUNITY
  Sally’s a ‘beacon of hope’
“Sally,” a 53 year-old pink firetruck dedicated to raising awareness of women’s health issues, was dedicated during a brief ceremony at SteelStacks recently. Though no longer making fire calls, this vehicle will now make home visits to women battling illness. Photo: State Rep. Marcia Hahn, cancer survivor Mae Trexler, daughter Linda Trexler and LV Pink Heals founder Bill Andress.
By Bernie O’Hare


PEOPLE
  Olympic teams earn medals
After their participation in the Big Sectional Games in May, three Bethlehem Special Olympics basketball teams were selected to compete in the Penn State University Special Olympics Summer Games in June. There, the Bethlehem participants earned five total medals: One of the three teams and one skills player earned gold medals and the other two teams and second skills player earned silver medals. The teams practiced each Monday night at Northeast Middle School from January until the beginning of the games. Members were coached by Emily Mulicka, Ryan Moll, Ami Bedics, Melissa Pedone, Austin


SCHOOL
  Bridges to the future
If you needed a cabinet built, or a health assessment, or a web page designed, the recent Bridges Foundation “Celebration of Excellence” was a good spot to be.
These are just a few of the many eclectic talents possessed by area high school students who received scholarship money from the foundation to continue their education.
By Alex Green

BETHLEHEM SPORTS
Freedom HS Athletes of the Year
Jake Young: Freedom’s Jack of All Trades
Helen Hsu: focused, goal-oriented, humble
By Peter Car and Katie McDonald

LEHIGH VALLEY FOCUS
Notre Dame summer theatre back with musical classic
For many, “Jekyll and Hyde” is a classic piece of literature and theater that transcends time and tells the gripping story of a rather torn man who struggles with his own identity. But for Rody Gilkeson, director of the Notre Dame Summer Theatre-Revelations Productions’ “Jekyll & Hyde: The Musical,” July 24 - Aug. 2, Notre Dame High School, Bethlehem Township, it also stands as an exciting opportunity.
By Luke Muench

OTHER STORIES
Bethlehem: Southside trash haulers ready to go
Bethlehem: It was his luck day at the library
Bethlehem Water Authority: Martin Tower zoning proposal decried
Bethlehem: ’22,000 acres, 115,000 people’
Lehigh Valley: Officers recognized for aggressive driving enforcement
South Bethlehem: 150th anniversary plans reviewed
Northampton County: Council tables name change
Fountain Hill: Council debates TV disposal
Fountain Hill: Council considers hiring bill collection agency
Bethlehem: 32nd annual block party

WEEKLY FEATURES
Around town community calendar
Police logs
Area obituaries
Center for Animal Health and Welfare
Volunteers
Student profiles
High school news reports

The Bethlehem Press online
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To subscribe: New start
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Tuesday, July 14, 2015


July 15, 2015


COVER STORY-PART 1
  Heroin addition: A growing epidemic
Heroin use is hitting an all-time high in the United States.
Between 2007 and 2012, the numbers of people using the drug each year rose from 373,000 to 669,000, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. In 2011, 4.2 million Americans aged 12 or older (or 1.6 percent) had used heroin at least once in their lives, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse.
By Chris Parker


NORTHAMPTON COUNTY
  Council approves pay raises
On April 16, Northampton County Council voted unanimously to approve across-the-board pay hikes, averaging 4.5 percent, for 228 county workers in 14 different clerical job titles. Deputy Administrator Cathy Allen told council it would cost about $307,000, and would be above and beyond whatever was being negotiated in union contracts. A human resources memo complained that “the county has struggled in recruiting and maintaining staff in many of the clerical positions t
Photo: After the meeting, Executive John Brown listened to Bob Werner (left), Scott Parsons (behind him) and magisterial employees who believe they are entitled to a 4.5 percent raise.
By Bernie O’Hare


COMMUNITY
  ‘Kind of like a family’
The 2015 Boutique Cancer fundraiser raised more than $230,000, which will be shared with local organizations which provide cancer treatment and support services.  The Cancer Support Community, St. Luke’s Cancer Center and St. Luke’s Hospice are those beneficiaries. At a volunteer luncheon following the late May sale held at the city’s municipal ice rink, volunteers learned the results of their efforts. More than 250 volunteers, set up, sorted, displayed, priced and assisted patrons, giving more than 10,760 hours of their time, the equivalent of 62 full-time employees. Representatives of each recipient organization lauded the efforts, citing the benefits derived from the Boutique’s support. Photo: Co-chairs Karen Hein, Jan Connell and Sharon Kunsman receives floral bouquets in gratitude for the countless hours they gave to the 2015 Boutique at the Rink.
By Dana Grubb


CLASSROOM
  ‘It’s a love form, not just a job’
When Bethlehem Area Vocational Technical School literacy coach Linda Moyer chose former White House Chef John Moeller’s book “Dining at the White House” to help bolster culinary arts students’ writing and reading skills, little could she have anticipated that Moeller himself would join the students for an in depth dinner preparation learning experience. Photo: Culinary students Thomas Benak Jr. and Kelly Von Steuben listen as Moeller explains how ingredients in the tomato, mustard and shallot dressing need to be chopped as finely as possible so that they “come together to make it more flavorful.”
By Dana Grubb

COMMENTARY
  Ed's World
By Ed Courrier

BETHLEHEM HISTORY
  Moulton, Rose Kleckner, photographers
Moulton A. Kleckner’s photographs of Bethlehem during the 1870s give us a glimpse of recreation in Bethlehem during in those years. His photographs reveal a peaceful community whose residents enjoyed fishing, boating, and men smoking pipes while appreciating beautiful vistas. Groups of tourists are shown reading the gravestones in the Moravian God’s Acre cemetery. The women in the photos wear hats and dresses with long skirts puffed out by layers of petticoats. The trees and lawns are neatly trimmed and the buildings and fences are well maintained.
By Karen M. Samuels

BETHLEHEM SPORTS
  Beachi and Freedom shine at Stellar
It would be fair to say that last weekend’s Stellar Basketball Tournament at Cedar Beach brought some surprises and two of Bethlehem’s teams were right in the middle of fortunate performances. Both Freedom and Bethlehem Catholic reached Sunday’s semifinal rounds to the surprise of many, including their own head coaches, to make a lasting impression in the summer’s marquee tournament.
By Pete Car

LEHIGH VALLEY FOCUS
  Alien vs. Native
There are several meanings that the word alien might trigger. Children might visualize creatures from outer space. Adults might think of someone crossing a border. I’m using the word to refer to alien critters and plants that are not native to a region. When you choose plantings, choose wisely and buy native plant species.
By Bud Cole

OTHER STORIES
Bethlehem: City zoners approve renovation variances
Bethlehem Township: Traditions suffers a minor setback in Green Pond plans
Lehigh Valley: Responses vary to proposed overtime changes
Fountain Hill/Hellertown: Local firefighters complete raining
Northampton County: Council approve pay raises

WEEKLY FEATURES
Around town community calendar
Police logs
Area obituaries
Center for Animal Health and Welfare
Volunteers
Student profiles
High school news reports

The Bethlehem Press online
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To subscribe: New start
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Friday, July 10, 2015


July 8, 2015

COVER STORY
  What a magnificent view!
But what is a Hoover-Mason Trestle anyway?
The recently opened Hoover-Mason Trestle walkway alongside the iconic Bethlehem Steel blast furnaces attracts a crowd of visitors to the elevated city mini-park which is in the heart of SteelStacks and former Bethlehem Steel plant remnants in South Bethlehem. The half-mile elevated pedestrian city park provides a refreshing view of former Bethlehem Steel buildings and structures in various stages of redevelopment. The South Bethlehem walkway is accessible by three staircases and is open daily from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday through Wednesday with extended hours to 9 p.m. Thursday through Saturday. See the PBS39 video at https://vimeo.com/ 131541788.
By Karen Samuels, Nate Jastrzemski and Tim Gilman


JULY 4TH
  Reading the Declaration
The fourth annual reading of the Declaration of Independence was forced indoors due to inclement weather on July Fourth with 10 readers reading the document in Bethlehem’s Town Hall. Photo: Jean Beauchner, Terry Geiger and Donna Rovito, lead the singing of the Star Spangled Banner prior to the reading.
By Dana Grubb


JULY 4TH
  A family affair
Soloist Barbara Kemmerer sings patriotic favorites during the July 4th performance of the Bethlehem Municipal Band before the fireworks at Payrow Plaza City Center. The Bethlehem resident is the wife of the band’s longtime director Don Kemmerer.
By Tim Gilman


BETHLEHEM
  Celebrating ‘Restaurant Week’
Downtown Bethlehem Association manager Tim Brooks stopped into the Historic Hotel Bethlehem’s Tap Room to enjoy lunch during restaurant week. Here server Rondo Jenkins hands off Brooks’ poached shrimp appetizer. “For 2015 we’re now including our DBA members on the Southside to make it a true DBA restaurant week,” said Brooks. The Hotel’s director of restaurant operations, Kathleen Brown, said that “restaurant week is incredibly well-received here at the Hotel. We always look forward to showcasing executive chef Michael Adams’ culinary skills.”
By Dana Grubb and Bernie O’Hare


CLASSROOM
  Arts Day at William Penn
Jonathan DeRaymond teaches William Penn ES students a thing or two about self-defense during Arts Day that took place this spring. A multitude of instructors from both inside the school and outside gave lessons on martial arts, theatre and just about everything in between.
By Alex Green

BETHLEHEM SPORTS
  Bethlehem loses wrestling legend Tony Iasiello
The Lehigh Valley lost a wrestling legend last week with the passing of former Bethlehem Catholic coach Tony Iasiello.
Iasiello, 72, was buried on Monday and the heavyweights of the sport all came to pay respects to a man that has given so much, not only to Bethlehem Catholic, but to the sport of wrestling and the Lehigh Valley.
By Peter Car


LEHIGH VALLEY FOCUS
  It’s still rock ‘n’ roll to Dion
Dion has a seven-decade career, equivalent to the careers of at least seven recording artists. There’s Dion of Dion and the Belmonts of doo-wop fame and the hits “A Teenager In Love,” hitting No. 5 on the charts, and “Where Or When,” hitting No. 3, both in 1959. There’s Dion the solo pop star, with “Runaround Sue,” No. 1 in 1961; “The Wanderer” and “Ruby Baby,” both hitting No. 2 in 1962, and “Donna The Prima Donna,” No. 6 in 1963.
By Paul Willistein

OTHER STORIES
Bethlehem: Mayor’s walk-in sessions a success
Northampton County: Former probation officer cited for lewdness
Northampton County: Council weighs in on gaming grant uses

WEEKLY FEATURES
Around town community calendar
Police logs
Area obituaries
Center for Animal Health and Welfare
Volunteers
Student profiles
High school news reports

The Bethlehem Press online
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To subscribe: New start
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Monday, July 6, 2015

Bethlehem Area School District
Honor rolls

Tuesday, June 30, 2015


July 1, 2015

COVER STORY
  Vigil focuses on hope, solutions
“This community stands together in solidarity with the community of Charleston, South Carolina,” Esther Lee said. “We come together, praying as we open our hearts, to join with people of the world and those who continue to hate.”
Lee, president of the Bethlehem NAACP, was one of 12 speakers at the June 24 prayer vigil held for the nine victims of the recent shooting at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston. Photo: Melvin Tatem, senior pastor of Grace Deliverance Baptist Church in Bethlehem, sings passionately during the prayer vigil held in memory of the Charleston victims.
By Katya Hrichak and Linda Anthony


ANOTHER VIEW
  Let’s begin to look inside ourselves to end racism
Fifty-one years after passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, America still suffers from the devastating social cancer of discrimination and racism.
Recently, the news inundated us with images and stories of the Charleston, S.C., church massacre and the announced removal of the Confederate flag from the State House grounds in South Carolina.
Commentray by Mark Reccek and Ed Courrier


COMMUNITY
  Stopping the ‘summer slide’
Advocates for youth summer programs pose with the Summer Learning Day banner colored by Horizons for Youth participants. The Cops ‘n’ Kids program was involved in the Learning Day events, hosting story time and a movie screening. NCC offers the Horizons for Youth program.
By Katya Hrichak


BETHLEHEM
  Bikes back on patrol
City and Lehigh University officials announced recently they had worked out another in a string of cooperative arrangements in May to put officers back on regular neighborhood bicycle patrols. Photo: Bethlehem and Lehigh University police ready to hit the streets.
By Nate Jastrzemski


COMMUNITY
  Wimmer Wag Fest goes to the dogs
It was dog day Sunday - literally - at the first-ever Wimmer Wag Fest held recently at the Animal Therapy Center in Bethlehem. The outdoor animal adoption event celebrated the work of 25 non-profit shelters, rescue centers and advocacy groups that participated with a variety of adorable adoptable pets from puppies and kittens to more mature animals. Photo: Retired Greyhounds lay around in the shade to rest from the May heat at Wag Fest.  They have exchanged the rigors of the racetrack for what they hope will be a loving home.
By Carole Gorney

BETHLEHEM SPORTS
  Hillard selected in NBA 2nd round
Darrun Hilliard got a phone call from his agent and left his Bethlehem living room right before the Detroit Pistons selected him with the 38th pick in the second round of Thursday’s NBA Draft. The Liberty graduate knew his name was going to be broadcast across the country, but wanted to watch the reaction of his family through the window of his home. Shortly before midnight, you can say that the Hilliard household made a lot of noise and Hilliard took it all in from a distance. It was a surreal night for one of Bethlehem’s sons, and one that he will always remember.
By Pete Car

LEHIGH VALLEY FOCUS
‘Hello,’ spectacle
The wonderful thing about an iconic show like “Hello, Dolly!” is that it pretty much sells itself. Since opening on Broadway in 1964, Jerry Herman’s 10-time Tony Award-winning classic has enchanted the eyes, tickled the funny bone and touched the heart.
By Makenna Masenheimer

OTHER STORIES
BASD: A tax hike is coming
Bethlehem: Book sales near $1M mark
Bethlehem Township: Board appoints new fire police
Colonial Regional: Freshpet donates to K-9 unit
Fountain Hill: Business reopens after fire
Lehigh Valley: Turning Point gets Verizon grant
Lehigh Valley: Medical Academy Charter School graduation
Lehigh Valley: Students participate in ‘Reality Fair’
Northampton County: Open space handout tables
Northampton County; Five deputies commended
Northampton County: One of four new contract approved
Saucon Valley: Students to get new iPads

WEEKLY FEATURES
Around town community calendar
Police logs
Area obituaries
Center for Animal Health and Welfare
Volunteers
Student profiles
High school news reports

The Bethlehem Press online
Where to buy the Bethlehem Press
To subscribe: New start
Send news to the Bethlehem Press
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