OUR 10TH YEAR OF SERVICE
TO THE CITY OF BETHLEHEM, BETHLEHEM AND HANOVER TOWNSHIPS AND THE BOROUGHS OF FOUNTAIN HILL, FREEMANSBURG AND HELLERTOWN

Phone: 610-625-2121 FAX: 610-625-2126 gtaylor@tnonline.com

Tuesday, July 19, 2016


July 20, 2016

COVER STORY

First Presbyterian
A church divided against itself

A Holy War is raging in Bethlehem. It’s not Christians against Jews, Jews against Muslims, or Muslims against Hindus. It’s actually a battle within one denomination and at one church. The congregation of the First Presbyterian Church of Bethlehem, which has existed for the past 141 years and includes 2,600 members, has voted overwhelmingly (76 percent) to break away from the Presbyterian Church USA. It has opted to join the Covenant Order of Evangelical Presbyterian Church (ECO).

By Bernie O’Hare

 

SAFETY
Drivers beware!

The City of Bethlehem, Penn-DOT and Lehigh Valley Health Network conducted a pedestrian safety event at New and West Fairview streets June 21 in an effort to alert pedestrians and drivers to pedestrian safety laws. According to Bethlehem Health Bureau chronic disease program director Sherri Penchishen, the intersections used to conduct the exercise are chosen based on well-marked crosswalks, multi lanes, visible signage and good traffic sight lines. The program has been in effect since 2004 and is funded using Highway Safety Grants from PennDOT. Photo: The driver of this black sedan drives right through the crosswalk just a couple of feet in front of ‘pedestrian’ Bill McQuilken, trauma prevention coordinator for the Lehigh Valley Hospital Network.

By Dana Grubb

 

BETHLEHEM

Benner plans apartments next to OBT

At its June 22 meeting, Bethlehem’s Zoning Hearing Board voted 3-0 to support dimensional variances that will permit Bethlehem Attorney Garrett Benner to build a 33-unit apartment building at 124-128 W. Union Blvd., next to the Old Brewery Tavern (OBT). The property is currently owned by the Casilio family, but is under agreement of sale to Benner’s B-Land Company. Photo: The existing two floors of 124 West Union will be converted to garage space and three floors of apartments will be built on top.

By Bernie O’Hare

 

COMMUNITY

Ramadan meal an inter-faith event

Bethlehem’s Zoning Hearing Board was scheduled to hear four cases June 22. Meetings can get pretty crowded, but it was still a surprise to see a big tent pitched outside city hall before the hearings started. Fortunately, the 150 people within the tent had no interest in variances or nonconforming uses. They were there for a Ramadan dinner and included people of all faiths – Muslim, Jew and Christian. The meal, completely free of charge, was for anyone interested in interfaith and intercultural dialogue. Photo: Ohran Guven sings a prayer while Dr. Kent Ozman and other Muslims hold hands out.

By Bernie O’Hare

 

SCHOOL

Freddys, a night of excellence

The 14th annual Freddy Awards presented May 26 at the State Theatre Center for the Arts in Easton cap the high school theater season for 29 schools in the Lehigh Valley and Warren County, New Jersey. Freddys promote and honor theatrical excellence for individual and groups.  Dieruff HS swept the event by winning Outstanding Overall Production with top honors for “The Producers.” Moravian Academy was awarded Outstanding Overall Production by a Smaller School with its production of “Big Fish.” Various scholarships and community awards from local sponsors are also presented. The State Theatre Center for the Arts, led by president and CEO Shelly Brown, is responsible for the Freddy Awards and its promotion of theatrical excellence leading up to the special awards night broadcast live by WFMZ  69. Photo: Actors and actresses from 29 schools participate in the Freddy Awards program opening number.

By Tim Gilman

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Becahi Athletes of the Year

No other sports for Jordan Young

By Katie McDonald

Luke Karam’s work ethic sets him apart

By Peter Car

 

LV FOCUS

Colin Hay: From a land downunder to the Musikifest Cafe

Pop music fans may know Colin Hay as the cheeky Aussie singer whose No. 1 hits “Who Can It Be Now” and “Down Under” by Men At Work, the New Wave group he fronted, contained lyrics of vague paranoia and, famously, a reference to that Australian dietary staple, the Vegemite sandwich.

By PaulWillistein

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem Authority: Gypsy moths reportedly under control

Bethlehem Authority: Turbine hearings continue in Penn Forest Twp.

Fountain Hill: Council fills full-time police position

Northampton County: Farmer slam open space finding

Northampton County: Weights, measures could be abolished

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

MEET THE PRESS





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Tuesday, July 12, 2016


July 13, 2016

COVER STORY

‘Together … or anarchy’


In our heart, say, ‘I’m going to make Bethlehem better,’” intoned Esther Lee, president of the local NAACP. It was part of a deeper sentiment, one reflected by every speaker at Payrow Plaza during a peace rally Monday evening, during which more than 200 residents showed their solidarity against recent violence by police and citizens on the national stage. Photo:
"It’s OK," says Grace Deliverance Baptist Church Senior Pastor Melvin Tatem, "because we serve our God and we want to see justice take place."

By Nate Jastrzemski and Dana Grubb

 

JULY FOURTH


Day starts with reading

Blessed with a sunny July Fourth morning, nearly 200 area residents assembled on Payrow Plaza to hear the fifth annual reading of the Declaration of Independence in celebration of the nation’s 240th birthday. Taryn and Jewel Gilbert perform the ‘Star-Spangled Banner’ during the program.

By Dana Grubb



Ends with mist and fireworks


Bethlehem fireworks from Sand Island along the Lehigh River can be seen from Payrow Center City Plaza where several hundred spectators defied the light rain to watch the show. The 60-foot high “Symbol of Progress” three-pronged sculpture made from Bethlehem steel is silhouetted by the display. The unique sculpture is symbolic of the various ethnic groups which make up the City of Bethlehem and join together at the top reaching outward.

ByTim Gilman




COMMUNITY

Blueberry festival opens July 16

Historic Bethlehem Museums & Sites presents its 30th annual Blueberry Festival July 16 and 17 at Burnside Plantation in Bethlehem. “The Sweetest Festival of the Summer” for visitors of all ages offers a variety of activities, including music, family activities, crafts, demonstrations and food. The two-day festival features blueberry delicacies which include crumb pie and cake, vanilla swirl ice cream, homemade pie, strudel and locally brewed blueberry beer and blueberry flavored wine. Festival hours are 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday and closing one hour earlier on Sunday. Organizers are looking forward to hosting another memorable experience, especially the 30th year of the Blueberry Festival. Photo: Blueberry strudel and vanilla swirl blueberry ice cream with fresh berries are a popular delicacy in the festival’s blueberry treats tent. Michelle Dahlgren of Hanover Township, a first-timer at the Blueberry Festival last year, is all smiles as she holds up a blueberry treat.

By Tim Gilman

 

COMMUNITY

Rotarians mark 100 years of service

After 100 years of serving the local community, the Rotary Club of Bethlehem celebrated its anniversary with a dinner and dance at the Historic Hotel Bethlehem June 3.  Rotary President Michael McGovern, and President-elect Gail Evans served as masters of ceremony. Bethlehem Mayor Robert Donchez, City Council President Willie Reynolds, U.S. Congressman Charlie Dent and Rotary’s District Governor-Elect Linda Young were all in attendance. A number of past district governors were also in attendance. Photo: Rotary President Michael McGovern holds a proclamation noting the Bethlehem Rotarty’s 100th presented by Mayor Robert Donchez.

By Dana Grubb

 

PEOPLE

Accepting their father’s medals

During the pre-fireworks festivities at the Breinigsville Fireworks July 2, Congressman Charlie Dent (R-15), presented the World War II medals to the family of Tom Meder, a native of Bethlehem, who never received the medals he earned during his war service. The medals were the Army Occupation and Honorable Service medals. Right: Half-brothers Paul Campbell, Sydney, Australia, and Tom Meder, Houston, Texas, receive their father’s WWII medals from Congressman Charlie Dent (center).

By Susan Bryant

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Liberty falls short in Stellar title bid

Liberty’s run at the Stellar Basketball Showcase over the weekend was better than expected.

The Hurricanes made a run to the tournament semifinals, before falling to Whitehall 51-47 to get ousted from the tournament. Liberty went 4-1 over the three day stretch and made their head coach a happy camper following their journey deep into Sunday’s action. “It was definitely a good weekend for us,” said Landis. “The kids did an awesome job playing hard and we won a couple of close games. After you’ve played multiple games in a day, we just didn’t have legs against Whitehall.”

By Peter Car

 

LV FOCUS

A healthy cup of Dixies memorabilia in Canal Museum exhibit

“Dixie: Easton’s Cup of Health and Happiness,” through Oct. 2, National Canal Museum, Easton, is an exhibition of vintage paper cups, advertisements and ephemera that tells the remarkable story of how marketing genius Hugh Moore replaced germ-ridden communal tin dippers with innovative healthy disposable paper drinking cups. “It seems like it’s a frivolous thing, a little disposable cup,” says Elissa M. Garofalo, President-Executive Director, Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor, Inc., which runs the Canal Museum. “But, when you think about a hundred years or so ago, and the health issues with shared cups and the disease that came out of that.”

By Ed Courrier

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem Council: New tax zone set

Bethlehem: Holy Infancy enjoys ‘banner’ day

Bethlehem Township”: Board renews quest for bathroom grant

Fountain Hill: Bacchanalia group donates $11,000

Northampton County: Who makes sure the gas pump is right?

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

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Tuesday, July 5, 2016


July 6, 2016

COVER STORY

A sunny 275th celebration

Bethlehem’s 275th anniversay celebration June 25 at the SteelStacks Campus on the city’s Southside was a day-long celebration featuring a variety of free activities centered around the Levitt Pavilion. Vendors offered food and refreshments and an assortment of interesting items by nonprofits and salespeople. The Liberty and Freedom high school bands performed, along with other musicians throughout the day. PBS39 premiered its documentary “Second to None: The Story of the Liberty High School Grenedier Band” on the Levitt Pavilion stage screen after the ceremony. The Bethlehem National Hall of Fame also inducted its first 28 nominees. The birthday bash Bethlehem concluded with a bright fireworks display as the clear skies darkened. The 275th committee has some special projects underway to make the celebration more meaningful to the historic community as it looks forward to the pivotal 300th anniversary.

By Tim Gilman

 

HALL OF FAME

Aches, pains come with pro career

Bethlehem area football fans had a chance to see Bethlehem Hall of Fame inductee and long-time Sports Illustrated writer Jack McCallum interview three fellow Bethlehem Hall of Fame inductees with over 30 years of combined NFL experience, Mike Guman, Mike Hartenstine and John Spagnola, during the City of Bethlehem’s 275th anniversary celebration June 25. These interviews were among several that featured a number of HOF members in the inaugural class. Photo: Sportswriter and author Jack McCallum (right) interviews fellow Bethlehem Hall of Fame inductees John Spagnola, Mike Guman and Mike Hartenstine in ArtsQuest’s Frank Banko Theater. Spagnola, Guman and Hartenstine spent over 30 years combined playing in the NFL. All four were inductees as part of the initial class going into the Bethlehem Hall of Fame.

By Dana Grubb

 

ANOTHER VIEW: ED'S WORLD
Graphic commentary by award winning artist Ed Courrier.


COMMUNITY

LHS Class of 65 presents scholarships

Liberty HS seniors Leticia Patino-Flores, Cailey Sanchez, Nathacha Soriano, Michael Silvertri and Timothy Walters each received a $1,000 scholarship from the Liberty HS class of 1965. The funding was raised as part of that class’s 50th reunion celebration in November 2015.

By Dana Grubb

 


BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Magnan part of Olympic trials

Omaha, Neb., was crowded last week between the College World Series and the Olympic Trials, and Freedom graduate, Sam Magnan was in the thick of it all. n“It’s pretty insane,” said Magnan by phone from Omaha. “There are about 14,000 people here [at Olympic Trials].” Magnan swam the 400 free and finished 30th among 107 competitors in that event. “I was pretty disappointed. Actually, I’m not happy with it at all,” Magnan said. The University of Virginia freshman was aiming for top eight and a faster time than 3:55.55, but swam a 3:56.43. In a time trial the next day, Magnan swam 3:56.20.

By Katie McDonald

 

LV FOCUS

Scaling ‘the Heights’ at Muhlenburg

“In The Heights” is “a beautiful score with the fundamental portrait of a neighborhood,” says Dr. James Peck, who’s directing the production July 13-31, Dorothy H. Baker Theatre, Trexler Pavilion for Music & Dance, Muhlenberg College, as part of the Muhlenberg Summer Music Theatre’s 36th season. “In The Heights” is a Tony Award-winning Broadway musical by composer and lyricist Lin-Manuel Miranda and librettist Quiara Alegría Hudes. Lin-Manuel Miranda is the acclaimed actor-creator of “Hamilton,” the smash Broadway musical which was nominated for 16 Tonys and received 11 this year.

By Nelson Quinones

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: Library opens new children’s center

Bethlehem: Book sale opens July 13

Bethlehem: Keystone honorees

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

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WANTED: Freelance reporter to cover evening municipal meetings in the Bethlehem area. Should have a journalism background (course work or experience) and a working knowledge of local governing bodies. Digital camera and photo skills a plus. Must live in immediate Lehigh Valley area. Send letter of interest and resume to George Taylor, The Bethlehem Press at gtaylor@tnonline.com.

Tuesday, June 28, 2016


June 29, 2016

COVER STORY

‘Smooth on the palate’

Early this month, Fegley’s Bethlehem Brew Works announced the release of Goundie’s Old Monocacy Ale, a limited edition beer that has been brewed in recognition of the City of Bethlehem’s 275th anniversary. The ale was brewed by beer historian and brewer Chris Bowen and former Fegley’s brew master Beau Baden this past February, just a block away from the Goundie House on Main Street, where its namesake, John Sebastian Goundie, one of Bethlehem’s first brewers, resided during the 19th century. Photo: Beer historian and brewer Christopher Bowen, Bethlehem Brew Works owner Rich Fegley and brewer Mike Wieboldt toast the release of ‘Goundie’s Old Monocacy Ale.

By Dana Grubb

 

BETHLEHEM

Mounted Police friends propose new home

The nonprofit Friends of the Mounted Police have announced that a new location for the Bethlehem Police Department’s mounted patrol has been secured and is under lease with the Allentown Diocese. The 10-acre parcel immediately abuts the Holy Savior Cemetery on Linden Street. The current site on Burnside Plantation houses George, Pharaoh, Grey and Asa, and has limited acreage for training and grazing. Photo: The Friends of Bethlehem Mounted Police continue to seek donations to construct the new barn facility for the four mounted patrol steeds.

By Dana Grubb

 

BETHLEHEM

Sister City alliance marks 20th anniversary

The 20th annual Slovenian Flag-raising at Payrow Plaza recognized the 25th anniversary of the Republic of Slovenia’s independence, as well as featuring the dedication of a monument that celebrates the 20th anniversary of the founding of the Bethlehem/Murska Sobota Sister Cities Association. Noting the Sister City relationship between Bethlehem and Murska Sobota, Slovenian Ambassador Dr. Bozo Cerar said, “We celebrate international friendships and partnerships.” Representing Murska Sobota Mayor Aleksander Jevsek, Brigita Bavcar presented a certification recognizing the 20th year of the sister city relationship and Bethlehem Mayor Bob Donchez presented Ambassador Cerar with a gift in honor of Bethlehem’s 275th anniversary celebration. Photo: Bethlehem/Murska Sobota Sister Cities Association founder Stephen Antalics Jr. and Slovenian Ambassador Dr. Bozo Cerar raise the Slovenian Flag, Mayor Bob Donchez raises the American Flag, and current BMSSCA President Eugene Novak conducts the flag raising ceremony.

By Dana Grubb

 

COMMUNITY

Beta Sigma Phil celebrates 85th anniversary

International women’s organization Beta Sigma Phi recently celebrated its 85th anniversary, and the local Tri City chapter recognized the milestone with a luncheon at the Best Western Conference Center on their April Founders Day. About 60 local chapter members gathered and enjoyed a fashion presentation that exhibited styles from each decade the sorority has been in existence. Founded during the Great Depression, today Beta Sigma Phi members represent 20 countries, raise more than $3 million annually for local charities and donate thousands of volunteer hours. Beta Sigma Phi is not an academic association; rather it’s a social community-supporting sorority involved in cultural programs, charitable work and developing social skills. Photo: A highlight of the Beta Sigma Phi Founders Day luncheon was a “celebration of the decades” fashion show in which chapter members modeled styles popular in the 85 years of the sorority’s existence. The show was coordinated by Lorita Musselman.

By Dana Grubb

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

LV Cup team falls in Carpenter Cup tournament

Lehigh Valley’s Carpenter Cup team ended its Softball Classic run last week with a 2-1 loss in 10 innings against Tri-Cape after defeating Chester County 8-3 at FDR Park in Philadelphia. “Maybe we just weren’t as focused as a team,” said Liberty’s Kristin Kaleycik. “We really thought we were going to win it. We were the team to beat.”Lehigh Valley, a solid hitting team, found themselves hitting for outs in the Tri-Cape game.

By Katie McDonald

 

LV FOCUS

GoFundMe begun for Bud Cole’s recovery

Bud Cole, long-time columnist for the Lehigh Valley Press whose award-winning “Bud’s View” appears in the Focus section, is grateful for the friends and relatives who’ve helped him in his recovery. Chief among these has been Sandy L. Burkart, PT, OCS, PhD, a fraternity brother at East Stroudsburg University and retired West Virginia University Professor and Chairman of Physical Therapy. Burkart has spearheaded a gofundme campaign to help retrofit the Lehigh Township house where Bud Cole lives with his wife, Bev.

By Paul Willistein



GRADUATION
Celebrating the Classes of 2016
Our annual graduation supplement is included in this issue along with extra photos inside the main section from area commencement ceremonies.


OTHER STORIES

Lehighton: Crowd overflows at Bethlehem Watershed turbine hearing

Lehighton: Residents prepare for turbine hearing

Lehighton: Candidates weigh in on wind issue

Bethlehem Council: Safety issues pass

Bethlehem School District: District updates reading. Math plans

Bethlehem School District: Board approves budget

Bethlehem School District: Policies, projects reviewed

Bethlehem: YWCA honorees reflect community commitment

Northampton County: Council rejects DCED staff, raise request

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

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Tuesday, June 21, 2016


June 22, 2016

COVER STORY

Farmer’s market under the trees


Judging by the continual stream of patrons, the new Bethlehem Rose Garden farmers’ market got off to a great start on its inaugural date June 11.  
Seven vendors provided a variety of fresh, organic, locally grown and homemade products and refreshments. Event contact Katie Stafford said she was very pleased to see many families and explained that she had hoped it would be an accessible event. Photo:

Bechdolt Orchards farm market manager Denise Filo restocks the supply of asparagus at their farmers’ market stand in the Rose Garden.

By Dana Grubb

 

PEOPLE

Esther Lee recognized for her pioneering civil rights work

Bombastic. Humorous. Bold. Empathetic. Domineering. Inclusive. These are just a few of the adjectives describing Lehigh Valley civil rights pioneer Esther Lee, whose distinctive church lady hats and booming yet eloquent voice make her instantly recognizable. After spending a lifetime fighting for social justice in the Lehigh Valley, Lee was honored by the IBPOEW, or Black Elks, at their annual state convention at Bethlehem’s Best Western Hotel on June 6.

By Bernie O’Hare

 



GRADUATION: LV CHARTER HS FOR THE ARTS

‘Change is what links us as a class’

With decorated caps and enthusiastic smiles, the 113 students of the Lehigh Valley Charter HS for the Arts graduating class of 2016 processed into Lehigh University’s Packer Chapel June 13 to commence a new stage in their lives. Executive Director Diane LaBelle began the addresses by reminding the students that although graduating signifies a major change, attending Charter Arts for the last four years has prepared them for it.

By Katya Hrichak and Dana Grubb

 

COMMUNITY

A day out on the Southside

Families enjoyed a free “Get Out” family festival with live music, kid’s activities, a farmers’ market, Zumba and food May 7 in the East Fourth Street parking lot between Atlantic and Hayes streets.  The event was sponsored by Community Action Development Corporation of Bethlehem (CADCB), Wells Fargo and the City of Bethlehem. Photo: Autumn Jastrzemski, 14, shows off her  hula hoop skills.

By Michelle and Thomas Meeh

 

MORAVIAN COLLEGE

‘Violence begets violence’

During a stirring talk at Moravian College, titled “Watering the Seeds of Peace: Facing Inequality, Violence, and War,” Claude AnShin Thomas shared his experience as a helicopter crew chief during the Vietnam War and the way it has shaped his life since. Thomas was Moravian’s ninth Peace and Justice Scholar in Residence. This year’s Scholar in Residence was co-sponsored by Moravian’s Peace and justice Studies program, the Religion and Sociology departments, the Healthy Minds student club, and the college’s inFocus Speaker Program.

By Dorothy and Dennis Glew

 

LEPOCO

Desperate families seek refuge

Twenty-five-year-old Troy E. Spier brought his experiences as a volunteer humanitarian aid worker to two dozen LEPOCO members and guests recently at the Lehigh Valley Friends Meetinghouse on Bath Pike. Spier, a second-year doctoral student in linguistics at Tulane University and Berks County native, spent three months in the Republic of Macedonia and on Lesvos Island, Greece, providing assistance to refugees fleeing war-torn areas in the Middle East and Africa.

By Ed Courrier

 

CHAMPIONS OF LITERACY

Instilling a love of reading

Ten “champions of literacy” were recognized at the second annual Celebration of Literacy banquet and awards ceremony, co-sponsored by the Colonial Association of Reading Educators (CARE) and Judith’s Reading Room in Bethlehem.  A total of 175 educators, award winners and their families attended the event at Cedar Crest College. Photo: The family of top Freedom Through Literacy posthumous award winner Kelly Stoops gathered for a photo after the ceremony. Stoops daughter Rosaria and 79-year-old father Tom Denny are seated in the front row.

By Carole Gorney

 

BETHLEHEM HISTORY

A journey to Bethlehem

Getting around William Penn’s vast land grant in 1681 must have been a daunting experience. When Pennsylvania’s boundaries were drawn, the commonwealth encompassed nearly 30 million acres of wilderness. In eastern Pennsylvania, Native Americans of the Delaware tribe hunted on a network of paths originally forged by the white tail deer they stalked.

By Ken Raniere

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Ertney leads Gold to win

All-Star Games are meant to be fun and the players who participated in last week’s 46th annual McDonald’s Lehigh Valley All-Star Football Classic got to have one last night of glory on the gridiron, as the Gold team edged the Red squad 65-62 at Andrew Leh Stadium.

By Peter Car

 

LV FOCUS

Born to lead

On July 15, 2014, Kassie Hilgert, ArtsQuest senior vice-president for marketing and advancement, was sitting in her second-floor office looking out at the rusting monoliths that once had been the blast furnaces of the former southside Bethlehem plant where steel-making ended in 1995 with Bethlehem Steel Corp. filing for bankruptcy in 2001. Downstairs at ArtsQuest Center, a decision was being made by the ArtsQuest Board of Trustees that would change her life.

By Carole Gorney

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: Come to the 275th party

Bethlehem: Mayor’s Task Force discusses bridge repairs, signage

Northampton County: Admin director Luis Campos resigns

Northampton County: Barron urges council to tax private hotels

Colonial: K9 ‘officer’ to get body armor

Northhampton Community College : Local graduates

Letters/views: Outraged by senseless act

Letters/views: A call to action

Letters/views: A thank you from the AAUW

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

To advertise: Ad staff

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