OUR 10TH YEAR OF SERVICE
TO THE CITY OF BETHLEHEM, BETHLEHEM AND HANOVER TOWNSHIPS AND THE BOROUGHS OF FOUNTAIN HILL, FREEMANSBURG AND HELLERTOWN

Phone: 610-625-2121 FAX: 610-625-2126 gtaylor@tnonline.com

Friday, April 29, 2016


Congratulations!

Bethlehem Mayor Bob Donchez recently recorded a brief video congratulatory message which will be shown during the Pennsylvania News Media Association’s Keystone Awards Banquet May 21 in Harrisburg. The Bethlehem Press was the overall Sweepstakes winner for weekly newspapers in its circulation range for the third year in a row. In addition to garnering the top overall award, 21 individual awards that went to the newspaper's staff. Donchez thanked editor George Taylor and his staff for delivering community news to Bethlehem area residents. Photo: Bethlehem Press editor George Taylor and Bethlehem Mayor Bob Donchez review Donchez's remarks as Blue Ridge Cable TV 13 cameraman Ron Bolek sets up to videotape the mayor offering congratulations to the Bethlehem Press. 
PRESS PHOTO BY DANA GRUBB


Tuesday, April 26, 2016


April 27, 2016

COVER STORY

Spring on the Southside

It might have been a little cool and windy outside, but the temperature was definitely hot at the annual Spring on the Southside chili cook-off and hot pepper eating competitions. There were 13 cook-off entrants competing for either the judges’ or the people’s  choice awards.  They were Social Still, Southside 313 (formerly Looper’s), Molinari’s, Steel Pub, CafĂ© the Lodge, Molly’s, Sotto Santi, Comfort Suites, the Banana Factory, the Puerto Rican Beneficial Society, Broadway Social and Gas Station, Tally Ho and Tulum. Photo: The Southside Arts Festival, on the grounds of the Banana Factory on Third Street, offered a variety of vendors, entertainment and actvities for visitors Saturday. The outdoor festival made its debut last year as the Urban Street Art Festival and expanded this year under the ArtsQuest umbrella.

By Carole Gorney and Tim Gilman

 

COMMUNITY

Bethlehem at 275- The gala

In 1741, a small band of Moravians from Germany, led by David Nitschmann and Count Nicolaus von Zinzendorf, established a mission community on 500 acres of land purchased from William Allen near where the Monacacy Creek and Lehigh River meet. On Christmas Eve that year, the new Moravian settlement was christened “Bethlehem” in honor of the birthday of Jesus. That was 275 years ago, and the city kicked off its official anniversary celebration with a formal gala at the Hotel Bethlehem, which stands on the very spot where the first Moravian house was built in 1741. More than 300 people, including city officials, former mayors and business and community leaders, paid $175 each ($300 a couple) to participate in the festivities that included an open-bar cocktail hour, multi-course dinner, short program and dancing to music of the David Leonhardt Band. Photo: Charlene Donchez Mowers, president of Historic Bethlehem Museums and Sites, chats with Bethlehem Mayor Bob Donchez before both give presentations to the gala audience. Mowers explained what life was like for the new arrivals in 1741. She was wearing blue ribbons on her costume to indicate that she was married.

By Carole Gorney

 

ENTERTAINMENT

’29 Cooks’ big winners in cookie competition

For the roughly 250 attendees at this year’s Girl Scout Cookie Crunch, which took place on National Girl Scout Cookie Weekend March 6, there were trays of mouth-watering desserts and appetizers waiting to be sampled. The event, at the ArtsQuest Center SteelStacks, originated in 2015 when Mark Demko, Senior Director of Communications for Arts Quest, conceived the idea of pairing a Girl Scout troop with a restaurant to produce a taste treat that incorporated one of the nine kinds of Girl Scout cookies. The purpose was to provide the scouts with a vocational training experience in the culinary arts. Photo: Isabella Scipioni, right, of Troop 8858, with the Limoncello Cheesecake made with Girl Scout Lemonades, this year’s entry from Bruno Scipioni Italian Ristorante, Bethlehem Township.

By Dorothy and Dennis Glew

 

MORAVIAN COLLEGE

‘An Evening with James Franco’

Award-winning actor James Franco answers questions about the choices he made in his acting career and about his accomplishments as a scholar, published author and volunteer during Moravian College’s Distinguished Speaker Series event April 15.

By Ed Courrier

 

S
PRING MUSICALS

Liberty HS Theatre presents ‘Pippin’

Liberty HS Theatre presented the Tony Award-winning musical “Pippin”  April 21 to 23 during three evening performances. Written by Roger O. Herson with music and Lyrics by Stephen Schwartz, “Pippin” was directed by Mark McKenna. Alan Frank conducted the orchestra. Gayle Justice was music and vocal director. Camille Armstrong was choreographer. Ree Harrington and Laura Papera designed costumes. Zachary Hefner handled lighting design. Beth Jansen was set designer and Judith Rivera was producer. Photo: The Leading Player (Brielle Rivera) leads the dance ensemble on the song “Glory.”

By Dana Grubb

 

BETHLEHEM HISTORY

Godfrey Daniels: 40 years of history

Although the 1970s brought an economic depression and caused a massive flight of local residents and businesses from downtown South Bethlehem, something positive was launched due to inexpensive rents. On March 19, 1976, a dream was born within the space of a long departed donut shop at 7 E. Fourth St. After months of cleaning and scraping off the years of layered grime, Dave Fry opened a new kind of venue for Bethlehem.

By Karen M. Samuels

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Pates look to keep Steel Division Lead

It’s the best start that Freedom’s baseball program has witnessed in the 10 years since Nick D’Amico has been head coach. The Patriots entered this week with an East Penn Conference best 12-1 record, as they sit atop first place in the Steel Division. Photo: Jake Petro slides safely into third base looking to avoid a face full of dirt during the team’s victory over Allen last Friday. The Pates fell behind 5-0 before rallying to beat the Canaries.

By Peter Car

 

LV FOCUS

‘Portrait of Revival’

The Society of the Arts (SOTA) opens the doors of the Moyer-Metzger Manse as part of its biannual SOTA Show House fundraiser. Proceeds from “A Portrait of Revival: The Moyer-Metzger Manse” support the Allentown Art Museum of the Lehigh Valley. The home, built in 1903 and designed by New York Architect E.S. Child, is at 1406 Hamilton St., Allentown, and is part of the city’s “Mansion Row.” The Shingle-style house was built for the Charles Moyer family.

By Ellen Wilson

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: HARB approves six applicants

Lehigh Valley: New gallery opens at Penn State campus

Northampton County: Council approves human resources reorganization

Bethlehem: Boutique plans progress

Bethlehem: Anglers spring into action

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports



MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

To advertise: Ad staff

Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter






Thursday, April 21, 2016


April 20, 2016



COVER STORY
Heroin: A full-court press

Basically, it would be hard to find two people more different than Northampton County DA John Morganelli and Representative Dan McNeill, (D-Pa.133rd). Morganelli is small in stature, but is a fearless prosecutor, with 25 successful homicide cases under his belt. McNeill is a tough former ironworker who dwarfs a podium. But he’s been deeply touched by the heroin epidemic ripping across the Lehigh Valley and the entire state.

By Bernie O’Hare

 

BETHLEHEM

‘Recovery is a life-long process'

A panel comprised of Bethlehem Mayor Robert Donchez, Bethlehem Police Chief Mark DiLuzio, Northampton County Coroner Zachary Lysek, Lehigh County Coroner Scott Grim, and Amanda Major Foehr, a certified recovery specialist from the Lehigh Valley Drug and Intake Unit, painted a challenging picture at an April 6 public forum addressing heroin addiction in the Lehigh Valley. About 25 attended the session in the Bethlehem Area Public Library’s Laros Room at the Main Branch. Photo: Amanda Major Foehr, a certified recovery specialist with the Lehigh Valley Drug and Intake Unit, said 80 percent of the people who become addicted to heroin started with prescription painkillers. Opioids prescribed to people between the ages of 15 and 29, she said, doubled between 1994 and 2007.

By Dana Grubb

 

COMMUNITY

Queens, princesses and shooting stars

Everyone was a winner in the first-ever statewide Miss Amazing pageant held in April at Moravian College in Bethlehem. Contestants practiced skills and gained self-confidence, volunteers and sponsors left knowing they had made a positive difference in others’ lives, and audience members shared the joy of achievement with those on stage. Photo: There were medals and crowns for every contestant to reflect the idea that everyone is a winner, and to celebrate abilities and strengths rather than disabilities.

By Carole Gorney

 

DINING

Prime Steak offers tasty cooking class

Reaching beyond its place as a fine eatery, Prime Steak House on Stoke Park Road for the past year has invited community members in for monthly cooking demonstration with chef John Wolf. Having worked in the kitchens of restaurants such as Caesar’s and the Cascade Lodge in Antigua, Wolf has leaned a wide range of cooking styles and is excited to share some tricks of the trade – as well as tasty recipes – during small, friendly classes the third Monday of each month. For registration and information, call 610-882-4070 or visit info@primestkhouse.com.

Photo: Ron and Jennifer Danyi and Kathy Plotts, all of Bethlehem, watch Chef John Wolf complete a batch of garlic-glazed pot-stickers Feb. 29. It was the Danyis’ second time attending a class at Prime.

By Nate Jastrzemski

 

COMMUNITY

Liberty HS Theatre soiree

The Friends of Liberty Theatre (FOLT) held their annual “Night of Excellence” soiree in March at the Bethlehem high school. The evening fundraising activities benefit theater arts at LHS. There were hors d’oeuvres, mocktails, raffles, music and entertainment in the school’s grand foyer. The event featured a cabaret show with Liberty Theatre students performing songs and snippets from popular plays. The soiree’s theatrical finale included the LHS students joined by Liberty Theatre alumni for a joint presentation of the popular song, “Lullaby on Broadway” from “42nd Street.”

Photo: The soiree’s theatrical finale includes Liberty students Robbie Papera, Stephen Wisser, Lindsey Sommons and Elizabeth Escott who are joined by Liberty Theatre alumni for a presentation of “Lullaby on Broadway” from the play “42nd Street.”

By Tim Gilman

 

SPRING MUSICALS

Notre Dame HS presents ‘She Loves Me’

“She Loves Me,” a romantic musical comedy adapted from the 1930s Hungarian play “Parfumerie,” is currently playing on Broadway and this weekend it’s being offered at Notre Dame HS in Bethlehem Township, too. The romantic musical show is about a store clerk and a salesgirl who work together at the Perfumerie shop in Budapest. They do not get along with each other yet they conduct an ongoing anonymous romantic correspondence. In the end, they overcome their personal differences and fall in love.

Photo: Employees from Maraczek Parfumerie, Ladislov Sipos (Peter Gambino), Georg Nowack (Luke Kenyon), Llona Ritter (Dannielle Hibshman) and Steven Kodaly (Joshua Mitchell) gather outside on a Budapest street before entering for work.

By Tim Gilman

 

BETHLEHEM HISTORY

An early rich musical life

Music was an important part of daily life in early Bethlehem. Hymns and brass ensembles served specific ceremonial functions. The Moravian church leaders encouraged the expertise of community members on stringed instruments, organs, pianos and wind instruments. Moravian missionaries carried their knowledge of this music deep into the wilderness of America. Photo: Moravian Trombone Choir members Charles Beckel, Jeremiah Weiss and Jacob Till.

By Karen M. Samuels

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Gunning headlines Liberty’s college signings

Liberty’s 2015-16 college signing class had 25 seniors recognized during last Friday’s press conference, but among the Division-II and Division-III athletes in the room, one athlete stood out, just like he did in his respective sport this season, to receive a full-ride to a Division-I college. Andrew Gunning, who became Liberty’s first state champion wrestler in 31 years after winning the PIAA heavyweight title in March, earned some kind words from athletic director Fred Harris about his scholarship to the University of North Carolina.

By Peter Car

 

LV FOCUS

Student poetry project

To commemorate National Poetry Month in April, the Lehigh Valley Press newspapers and web sites present the 11th annual Student Poetry Project. Students whose poems appear on Page B1 had the opportunity to read their poems and be interviewed on the April 18 “Lehigh Valley Arts Salon,” Lehigh Valley Community Public Radio Station WDIY, 88.1, wdiy.org.

By Paul Willistein

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: School board approves student literacy training

Bethlehem Authority: Wind project nearing first permit stage

Fountain Hill: Council reviews meetings, buildings

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports



MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

To advertise: Ad staff

Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter







 

Friday, April 15, 2016


April 13, 2016

COVER STORY

Iditarod support

When Walt and Jan Tremer attended their first Iditarod dog sled race in 1996, they fell in love with the rugged and beautiful Alaskan terrain and the test that the race puts both mushers and dog teams through to complete it. Jan, who teaches figure skating at the city’s municipal ice rink, later decided to hold Iditaskate fundraising events to help teams cover the costs of racing. This year’s event was held on an appropriately wintry night in February. Skaters took laps around the rink to total up miles in an effort to travel the over 1,000 mile distance of the actual Iditarod. Refreshments were offered and a raffle was held; common fundraising efforts that raise about $3,000 each year. This year’s event supported the Dew Claw Kennel’s participation in the 2016 Iditarod held in March.

By Dana Grubb

 

LEHIGH VALLEY

New food council tackles hunger, food waste and farm loss

An extensive collaborative effort is under way in the Lehigh Valley to resolve the growing hunger crisis by strengthening the local food economy, increasing access to fresh foods and supporting local farming. Spearheading the initiative is the newly organized Lehigh Valley Food Policy Council, which was launched last September and held its second semi-annual meeting recently at the Unitarian Universalist Church in Bethlehem. Photo: The food access working group is one of nine organized under the food policy council to address various food-related issues.

By Carole Gorney

 

SPRING MUSICALS

Bethlehem Catholic presents ‘Wonderful Town’

Bethlehem Catholic HS Theater is presenting its Freddy Awards entry of “Wonderful Town.” The musical production continues its second week of performances April 15 and 16 at 7 p.m. Sherwood sisters Eileen and Ruth, played by MacKenzie Hall and Madeylin Dundon, come to New York City from their small hometown in Ohio to find new careers and romance in the busy metropolitan life of bright lights and tall buildings. Despite challenging difficulties with Greenwich Village neighbors and demanding job interviews, both sisters end up getting their dream jobs and dream guys in New York City - the wonderful town. Debbie Acampora directed and choreographed the show. Ticket purchase information is available at 610-866-0791. The high school auditorium is located at 2133 Madison Ave. in Bethlehem. Photo: New York residents from Greenwich Village dance as a tourist takes pictures in the neighborhood along Christopher Street where new big-city arrivals Ruth and Eileen Sherwood are moving.

By Tim Gilman

 

SPRING MUSICALS

LV Charter HS for the Arts presents ‘Evita’

Lehigh Valley Charter HS for the Arts presents the musical “Evita” with five performances on April 13, 14, 15 and 16 at 7 p.m. and Sunday, April 17 at 2 p.m. at the Charter Arts Theatre, 321 East 3rd St., Bethlehem. “Evita” is the story of Eva Peron’s rise from poverty to becoming famous actress and wife of Argentine President Juan Peron. With music by Andrew Lloyd Webber and lyrics by Tim Rice, the Charter Arts production is directed by Kelly Bickert. Neil Chaban is musical director, choreography is shared by Bickert and Christopher Ryland, and Peter Wrenn-Meleck is technical director. Tickets are are available online at www.CharterArts.org. Photo: Now Married and with Juan elected president of Argentina, Eva Peron (Lynsey Jeffrey) and Juan Peron (Nico Gonzalez) celebrate with their Argentine supporters.

By Dana Grubb

 

BETHLEHEM HISTORY

St. Luke’s made medical history

To the credit of Bethlehem’s clergy, entrepreneurs, and concerned citizens, St. Luke’s Hospital was ready to admit its first patient Oct. 17, 1873. The three-story, double brick building, located on the 400 block of Broadway, had 20 rooms to accommodate eight beds. Bethlehem contractor Abraham Yost built the structure originally as a double tenement house. The building was purchased for $8,000 by the St. Luke’s Hospital Board and adapted for use as a hospital. It was the first hospital in the Lehigh Valley. The closest hospital to Bethlehem before St. Luke’s was established was more than 50 miles away in Philadelphia. Photo: In 1881, at age 25, Dr. William L. Estes became the director of the St. Luke’s Hospital. He brought many innovations to the hospital such as a school of nursing and a social services department.

By Karen M. Samuels

 

DOWNTOWN BETHLEHEM

Parading ‘doggedly’ for prizes

Though it was hardly dog eat dog, the competition was stiff in Donegal Square’s  annual  Celtic Doggie Parade in downtown Bethlehem. In all there were 15 entrants and their owners competing in four categories: smallest, largest, leprechaun wanna-be, and  dog/owner look-alike. Donegal  Square owner Neville Gardner sponsors the competition, and the prize in each category was a Donegal Square gift certificate. Proceeds  from the event,  including the entry fee and donations, go to the Northampton  County Center for Animal Health and Welfare, a no-killer shelter, which serves cats and dogs. Bobby Gunther Walsh, radio broadcaster, matches the proceeds dollar for dollar with contributions. Photo: Neville Gardner announces the four competition categories to the assembled spectators.

By Dorothy and Dennis Glew

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Becahi football coach steps away

Bethlehem Catholic football coach Joe Henrich met his players last Friday morning to announce that he was taking an immediate “indefinite family leave of absence.” The decision came as a shock to players, as offensive coordinator, Kyle Haas, will now step into the spotlight as interim head coach moving forward. “I will be taking an indefinite family leave of absence from coaching effective immediately,” Henrich said in a statement released last week. “I have been blessed to serve the young men in our program over the last five years.”

By Peter Car

 

LV FOCUS

Semi-toned

When 12 students from The University of Exeter first step on stage with their iconic maroon shirts and patent-leather shoes, prepare to be astonished. Known for “tight harmonies and even tighter trousers,” Semi-Toned, the all-male a cappella group from the United Kingdom, takes the stage, 7:30 p.m. April 15, Miller Symphony Hall, Allentown, with their “Game of Tones” tour. The group has been together for five years and Tommy Hamer, the music director of the group, says it’s been a spectacular  journey.

By Ashleigh Strange

 


OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: City Council talks street vacation

Bethlehem: City one of 7 to host aging forum

Northampton County: Parking renovations approved

Hanover Township: Residents say they were misled

Lehigh Valley feature: Living life well-Bob Hollinger
Lehigh Valley feature: Whitehall man pens book in Viet Nam military life

Bethlehem Township: Spending for roads, sports

Saucon Valley: District to offer full-day kindergarten in fall 2016

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports


MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

To advertise: Ad staff

Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter







 

Friday, April 8, 2016


April 6, 2016

COVER STORY

Bethlehem's Deed Day

Hundreds of visitors enjoyed a trip back in time Saturday at the Moravian Archives of Bethlehem … 275 years back in time to be precise. For one day only, the original 1741 title deed for Bethlehem was on display for the public. Depending on when one arrived, entertainment was provided by the Bethlehem Area Moravian Trombone Choir or the members of Moravian College’s Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia performing Moravian instrumental and choral music.

Photo: A crowd gathering at the entrance to the Moravian Archives building  listens to the Bethlehem Area Moravian Trombone Choir at the opening of the one-day exhibit of the 1741 Bethlehem Deed which established the Moravian community that became the City of Bethlehem.

By Karen Samuels and Tim Gilman

 

SPRING MUSICALS

Freedom presents ‘Guys and Dolls’

Freedom HS’s Theatre Company presents “Guys and Dolls” for a five-performance engagement in the high school auditorium April 6, 7, 8 and 9 at 7 p.m. and on Sunday, April 10 at a 2 p.m. matinee. Tickets may be purchased by calling 610-867-6630 or by visiting www.fhstheatrecompany.com. Based on the book by Jo Swerling and Abe Burrows, with music and lyrics by Frank Loesser, the Tony Award winning musical is directed by Jennifer Wescoe.

By Tim Gilman

 

BETHLEHEM HISTORY

Fire destroys O’Reily store

In the early frigid hours of Jan 16, 1918, Mary O’Reilly awoke to the distant sounds of shouts from the street and the smell of smoke. She ran down to the second floor exit door and burned her hand on the doorknob. When she pushed on the door she was met with flames and heavy smoke. Her hair caught on fire as the flames burst toward her. Mary quickly extinguished her hair and ran to the third floor bedrooms to wake her sister Susan O’Reilly and their young maid, Mary Alantosh. The smoke followed her into their apartment above the E. O’Reilly Department Store and soon overcame the O’Reilly sisters, causing them both to fall unconscious. The servant, Mary Alantosh, threw open the window and prepared to jump from the three-story ledge.

By Karen M. Samuels

 

SPRING MUSICAL

Nitschmann presents ‘Penzance Jr.’

The Nitschmann MS Drama Club performed Gilbert and Sullivan’s comic opera, “The Pirates of Penzance Jr.,” at four performances held in the Moravian College Haupert Union Building’s Prosser Auditorium from March 11 through 13. Sarah Hriniak directed and produced, and her assistant was Maurene Schultheis. Stage crew director Skip Moyer and assistant stage crew director Nick Laudenslager, art director Barb Kozero and tech director Erik Masters rounded out the production team. Photo: Led by the Pirate King (Everest Byrne) and Samuel (Luke Rider), the pirates celebrate Frederic’s (Miles Lunger) twenty-first birthday and end of his pirate apprenticeship.

By Dana Grubb

 

LEHIGH VALLEY

Pet Expo popular with pet owners

The Lehigh Valley Pet Expo attracted many families with their children and pets, mostly dogs on leashes admitted free. Many of the pet lovers were newcomers to the annual exposition in the Agri-Plex building at the Allentown Fairgrounds. The popular event was sponsored by Family Pet Shows in late January. The large indoor attraction was popular with visitors able to enjoy a petting zoo, pony rides, pet-related vendors, pet demonstrations, daily animal parades with owners, cat show competition and  rescue association booth. Photo: Dog rescue volunteers at the Lehigh Valley Pet Expo Heather Bagasezich and Janet Both of Whitehall with their leashed beagle share information and experiences with Angie Pentz of Lehighton who holds onto her two Bassett hounds and a smaller beagle.

By Tim Gilman

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Despite loss, Steel FC makes home debut

It was a blustery and cold afternoon at Lehigh’s Goodman Stadium, but Sunday’s home debut for Bethlehem Steel FC left fans warm inside despite the weather conditions. A spirited and rowdy crowd of 3,655 fans welcomed back high-caliber professional soccer to the area with open arms, restoring the tradition of the original Bethlehem Steel soccer club, which ended in 1930.

By Peter Car

 

LV FOCUS

‘Peter and the Wolf’ and other fairy tales

For its spring performance, Repertory Dance Theatre is presenting “Peter and the Wolf and Other Fairy Tales,” a delightful afternoon of story ballets for audiences of all ages, 2 p.m. April 10, Scottish Rite Cathedral, 1533 Hamilton St., Allentown. A workshop for ages 4-8 precedes the ballet at 12:45 p.m. April 10 at Scottish Rite Cathedral. Former Joffrey Ballet star Trinette Singleton, RDT co-artistic director and a member of the dance faculty at DeSales University, and Jennifer Haltzman Tracy, RDT executive and co-artistic director, created new choreography to bring three fairy tales to life through dance. Excerpts from “Peter and the Wolf,” “The Steadfast Tin Soldier” and “Swan Lake” will showcase the talent of RDT dancers.

By Paul Willistein

 

OTHER STORIES

Lehigh Valley: Citizen oppose UGI rate hike

Bethlehem: School board trims preliminary budget

Bethlehem: Fahy Bridge project under way

Bethlehem Township: Vandalism, sinkholes plague park

Bethlehem: Conservation board grants approvals to walk-in

Bethlehem: AAUW readys for book sale

Bethlehem: Library book sale nets nearly $20,000

Hellertown: East egg hunters

Salisbury: Golden Gate jumper promotes suicide prevention

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports



MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

To advertise: Ad staff

Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter







 

Thursday, March 31, 2016


March 30, 2016

COVER STORY

Preserving a landmark

Wilbur Mansion will be converted into Class A office space while retaining many original features. The mansion was originally built by Elisha Packer Wilbur, who was president of Lehigh Valley Railroad, treasurer and board member at Lehigh University and was associated with a number of local businesses, including the E.P. Wilbur Trust Bank. He was also a director at the Lehigh Valley National Bank of Bethlehem.

By Bernie O’Hare

 

BETHLEHEM

Good Friday reenactment

The annual three-mile Pilgrimage of the Cross procession by costumed youth members of Christ Church UCC through historic downtown Bethlehem to Moravian College and back to the church at Center and East Market streets took place on Good Friday. The cast of 16 actors reenacted the Biblical Easter story of Jesus Christ carrying a wooden cross to a site outside Jerusalem. A Good Friday service preceded the outdoor reenactment. Janet Quinn, director of Children and Youth Ministry at the Christ Church UCC, coordinated the event.

By Tim Gilman

 

BETHLEHEM

New Bethany Ministries celebrates 30th

Guests, patrons, staff and beneficiaries of New Bethany Ministries gathered at Lehigh University’s Zoellner Arts Center March 18 to celebrate 30 years of helping over 100,000 hungry, homeless, poor, and mentally ill clients find new opportunities and more secure futures. Photo: Pamela Lewis with Tommy, who moved into New Bethany Ministries’ Columbia House in January 2005. By 2006, he was a caretaker of the house, and in 2012 he also enrolled in the Representative Payee Program. He says, “I love that program because I need the structure. It makes sure I can keep the apartment and save money when I can’t self-regulate.”

By Joanna Ireland

 

EASTER

Sunrise at Central Moravian

More than 260 early morning worshipers attend the Easter Sunrise Service which starts at Central Moravian Church in downtown Bethlehem and concludes at the nearby God’s Acre Cemetery. The Bethlehem Area Moravian Trombone Choir provides the music for the dawn service which dates back more than 130 years. The choir holds the distinction of being the oldest all-trombone musical organization in continuous existence since 1754.

By Tim Gilman

 

COMMUNITY

Bethlehem Twp. Hosts egg hunt

At least a half hour before Bethlehem Township’s Easter egg hunt was ready to begin, at least 300 kids were already lined up behind the yellow tapes in front of the Community Center. At T-minus five minutes, the yellow tapes separating kids from the eggs were gone. At T-minus one minute, some kids were unable to resist the urge to get a head start and would dart out, followed by a mother or father who would empty their basket. When a fog horn finally announced the start, the eggs were gone in seconds. No children were harmed, but the Easter Bunny is missing. Above: Once the foghorn blew, it was every man (or kid) for himself.

By Bernie O’Hare

 

CLASSROOM

Freedom’s ‘egg extravaganza’

Freedom HS National Honor Society members helped organize and execute an Easter egg hunt for district employees’ children March 20. Above: Meghan Eller, vice president; Miriam Siddiqui. president; Alexa Reich, secretary; and member Linda Cordero smile as they sell raffle tickets to win the chocolaty prizes pictured here.

By Ross Sonnenblick

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Hurricanes favored to take Steel Division

There should be little doubt about whether Liberty’s baseball team can qualify for the postseason this spring, but whether the Hurricanes can win the league or district title will be up to them. The ’Canes return the deepest roster in the East Penn Conference Steel Division and will hope to use that to their advantage, as they head into the season as favorites to come away with the division crown.

By Pete Car

 

LV FOCUS

Businessman produces health care cost filmFor Richard Master, the health-care conundrum got personal. He was in Chile with his wife, Susan, and son, Aaron, to meet the future in-laws of his son’s fiancee, Paz. After arriving in Santiago, Aaron developed an asthma reaction. At a pharmacy, they expected to pay $150 for an inhaler. “Low and behold, it cost $15,” Master recalls. Photo: Richard Master, executive producer of the film, “Fix It: Healthcare at the Tipping Point,” to be shown at 7:30 p.m. April 4, ArtsQuest Center, SteelStacks, Bethlehem.

By Paul Willistein

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: City sign project finding its way

Bethlehem: Water authority seeks control in pipeline, wind projects

Bethlehem: CADBC 20/20 program nets another $600K

Lehigh Valley: Volunteer return safely following airport attack

Lehigh Valley: Girl Scouts announce ‘Take the Lead’ honorees

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports



MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

To advertise: Ad staff

Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter