OUR 10TH YEAR OF SERVICE
TO THE CITY OF BETHLEHEM, BETHLEHEM AND HANOVER TOWNSHIPS AND THE BOROUGHS OF FOUNTAIN HILL, FREEMANSBURG AND HELLERTOWN

Phone: 610-625-2121 FAX: 610-625-2126 gtaylor@tnonline.com

Thursday, August 25, 2016


August 24, 2016

COVER STORY

Celebrating silver

Olympic medal winners Ryan Crouser and Joe Kovacs proudly wave their flags after winning gold and silver medals in the shot put competition. Cheers erupted from about 100 people gathered at Bethlehem Municipal Golf Club to watch the event Aug. 18.

By Michalle Meeh

Photos by Tim Gilman

 

COMMUNITY

Sharing gardening love

On July 21, Silver Creek Country Club hosted about 130 members of the Bethlehem Garden Club (BGC), which is celebrating its 85th anniversary this year. Dedicated to educating members and the community about gardening, sharing tips and experiences, and supporting civic planting to beautify areas around Bethlehem, the club meets on the third Thursday of every month at Advent Moravian Church. Photo: Silver Creek Country Club hosted about 130 members of the Bethlehem Garden Club in July. The club is celebrating its 85th anniversary this year.

By Joanna Ireland

 

BETHLEHEM

Bike share program ‘Ready to roll’

“I am pleased to announce the launch of Bike Bethlehem!” declared Mayor Robert Donchez from the steps of the Bethlehem Public Library Aug. 15. “I hope the Bethlehem Bike Share will be so successful that it will continue to expand throughout the city,” he added before turning to City of Bethlehem Health Director, Kristin Wenrich, for an overview of Bethlehem’s innovative new program. Photo: Bethlehem Public Library Director Josh Berk helps launch Bike Bethlehem! by peddling one of the loaner bicycles through a red ribbon held between Dr. Stephen Olenchock from St. Luke’s University Health Network and Lisa Ronca, co-owner of Cutters Bike Shop. The press conference announcing the new community bike sharing program was held at the Bethlehem Public Library.

By Ed Courrier

 

CLASSROOM

Kids keep him young

When Bill Safranek started teaching at Freedom HS in 1987, the average yearly income was $24,350, a gallon of gas was $.89 and a U.S. postage stamp would have set you back 24 cents. Fast forward to 2016, the year of Safranek’s retirement: The average income is $53,657, the cost of a gallon of gas has more than doubled to $2.13 and a stamp costs 47 cents. Of course, there have been many other changes since then. In 1987, Michael Jackson, Whitney Houston and U2 were making albums we listened to on cassette tapes. Now, we listen to music on personal devices via streaming services, downloaded digital “albums” or Internet radio. But some things never change. During his 30 plus years of teaching science and mentoring students, Safranek affected young lives in so many ways.

By Pattie Giordani



ENTERTAINMENT
Musikfest comes to a close
Musikfest street performer the Kilted Colin of Boston balances on his 10-foot unicycle and prepares to play his bagpipes for the crowd gathered below on Main Street in downtown Bethlehem.
Photos by Tim Gilman and Ed Courrier


BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Football returns

Football is back this weekend as the regular season opens with a full slate of contests for Bethlehem area teams, starting with Friday night’s opener at Bethlehem Area School District Stadium with Freedom and Central Catholic squaring off at 7 p.m. Friday night’s affair is the marquee contest in the East Penn Conference this weekend and head coach Jason Roeder is excited to see what the 2016 Patriots will have on display to start their campaign.

By Peter Car

 

LV FOCUS

Great Allentown Fair opens Aug. 30

The Great Allentown Fair, Aug. 30 - Sept. 5, celebrates its 164th year providing a fun and educational experience for all ages. The Fair’s motto is “Don’t leave summer without it.” The Lehigh County Agricultural Society is the nonprofit owner and operator of The Allentown Fairgrounds, 302 N. 17th St., bounded by 17th, Liberty and Chew streets, Allentown, where The Great Allentown Fair is held. The Fair is the fulfillment of the Society’s mission, conceived in 1852, as stated in its bylaws: “The object of the Society is and shall remain the improvement and advancement of Agriculture, Horticulture, Livestock, Domestic and Mechanical Arts and the entertainment of its membership and patrons.”

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: City council approves armory project

Bethlehem: Ecopax breaks ground for second facility

Bethlehem Township: Board tables repaving project plans

Northampton County: Children &Youth handling record calls

Northampton County: Gracedale hit with state deficencies

Lehigh County: Two more police departments to administer Naloxone

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

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Tuesday, August 16, 2016


August 17, 2016

COVER STORY

A wink from the Copper Cowgirl

The Copper Cowgirl galloped her way into Musikfest this year as your friendly living statue from the Old West. This was the first year she performed at Musikfest and in the United States. The Copper Cowgirl is one of the many Buskers, street performers, appearing throughout

By Tracy Rice

 

PEOPLE

Activist Joan Messenlehner honored on 77th birthday

Most people in Northampton County politics know Joanne Messenlehner as a Democratic activist, a two-time party chair who has orchestrated numerous campaigns over the years. What many don’t know is that she grew up on Bethlehem’s Southside. A Stofko, she was the first member of her family to go to college. She went on to become a teacher and swim coach in the Bethlehem Area School District, and moved her family out of the projects. Photo: Sarah Kaboly, Valerie Kiltie, Lamont McClure, Kaija Farber, Joanne Messenlehner, Lori Vargo Heffner, John Morganelli and Geri Stofko Ameri

By Bernie O’Hare

 




COMMUNITY

Huge crowd marks Freemansburg NNO

National Night Out, held on the first Tuesday of August, is a chance for police and other first responders to get together with the local residents they serve and show them that they are here to serve.Though Freemansburg has one of the tiniest communities in the Lehigh Valley, it has one of best of these community gatherings. Where else can you go to get a hot dog grilled by Mayor Jerry Yob? A hamburger flipped by council member Justin “Peanuts” LaBar? All washed down with a root beer poured by council member Ed Smith? And the price is right, too. Free. Which helps explain why at least 500 people crowd into the Municipal Park.

By Bernie O’Hare

 

SALISBURY TOWNSHIP

Police chief gets White House briefing

In June, Salisbury Township Police Chief Allen W. Stiles received an email from The White House, inviting him to participate in a “White House 21st Century Policing Briefing.”

The White House Office of Public Engagement and Intergovernmental Affairs coordinated the event. Photo: Police Chief Allen W. Stiles at the White House.

By Deb Galbraith

 

CLASSROOM

Moravian Academy’s King’s focus was the students

During George N. King Jr.’s nine years as headmaster of Moravian Academy, his major focus was the students. Not just their education, but their overall growth as human beings. He was happy and proud to witness some of those students grow up before his eyes during those years. “Several members of the class of 2016 and I started at the Academy the same year,” King said. ”It has been my pleasure to watch them develop and progress through our lower, middle and upper schools.”

By Pattie Giordani

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Local football practices kick into high gear

High school football teams across the state opened up practices last week with their heat acclimation period, but one thing all coaches and players were looking forward to heading into the start of practice this week was putting on the pads and getting physical. PIAA rules forbid hitting during the opening week of the heat acclimation period, but Monday brought new life on the gridiron, as teams were allowed to strap up and lay some wood on their fellow teammates.

By Peter Car

 

LV FOCUS

The Hooters come to Levitt

Rob Hyman doesn’t remember exactly when The Hooters last performed in the Lehigh Valley, but he remembers the Lehigh Valley. “We played some clubs in Allentown. There was a place called Nikko’s [along South Eighth Street]. That was one of our early hangouts. We picked up some loyal fans.“We started up in Levittown and Allentown and then we moved into Philly and we brought some of those fans with us,” Hyman says, pausing and then joking, “They know who they are.”

By Paul Willistein

 

OTHER STORIES

Meals on Wheels: Helping elder keep their pets

Bethlehem: School district finance, projects in good shape

Bethlehem: HARB applicants asked to do more homework

Bethlehem: Laros grants awarded

Saucon Valley: Administrators explain math book approval

Freemansburg: Borough officials discuss upgrades

Valley: Sen. Casey addresses infant addiction

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

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Tuesday, August 9, 2016



August 10, 2016

COVER STORY

‘A catalyst that brings us together’
Musikfest commenced its 33rd year with an opening ceremony at Wells Fargo Festplatz on the north side of Bethlehem Aug. 5. Declared the “largest Musikfest ever” by ArtsQuest President and CEO Kassie Hilgert, this year’s festival will feature 387 artists from 20 states and seven countries and will bring in $60 million for the city and region. Photo: Annual Musikfest Founders Awards are presented by ArtsQuest Chairman of the board of trustees Gregg Feinberg of Allentown. Barry Fisher of WLVT 69 News and Julia Corwin, director of brand marketing for the Bethlehem Sands Casino/Resort accept awards specially crafted at the Banana Factory. Neville and Linda Gardner, of Donegal Square and the Red Stag Pub in Bethlehem, were unable to attend to receive their awards.
By Katya Hrichak
Photos by Tim Gilman


FOUNTAIN HILL

Clerk honored for years of service

Douglas Trotter Jr. and Larry Rapp watch as Director of Finance, Bethany Sebesta presents Borough Clerk Barbara Merkle with the “Cecil K. Leberknight Award for 10 or more years of service” at the Fountain Hill Borough council meeting,

By Ed Courrier

 

BETHLEHEM

Luncheon celebrates Boutique’s success

At the volunteer luncheon held following the Boutique at the Rink, 2016 co-chairs Jane Schaffer, Sharon Kunsman and Karen Hein are presented with floral bouquets in recognition of their strong commitment to the fundraising event. Presenting the bouquets are representatives of the three charitable organizations that benefit, executive director of the Cancer Support Community, Paula Sue Ream, president of St. Luke’s Hospice and Home Care, Lisa Giovanni, and St. Luke’s University Health Network vice president of development, Patrick Bower.

By Dana Grubb

 

COMMUNITY

Tournament’s 37th year

The Boys and Girls Club of Bethlehem’s 37th annual golf tournament was held at the Silver Creek Country Club June 13 and the 80 golfers who supported the event couldn’t have enjoyed better weather with blue skies, temperatures in the 70s and a gentle breeze. Photo: As Bruce Palmer tees off on the first hole, the rest of his foursome, Gerry Long, Jeff Zettlemoyer and Jill Long await their turn.

By Dana Grubb

 

BLUEBERRY FESTIVAL

Sweet treats

This summer’s Blueberry Festival was held July 16 and 17 at the historic Burnside Plantation along the Monocacy Creek. The popular 28th annual festival is organized by Historic Bethlehem Museum and Sites as a community service and fundraiser, and features a variety of predominantly family-friendly activities, including live musical entertainment, children’s arts and crafts, and blueberry delicacies. An expanded brewery tent with a restricted section for adults to sample blueberry beer, wine, mead and vodka attracted a steady flow of visitors. The popular pie-eating contests were held both days. A variety of food vendors and regional crafters kept fest-goers busy. Above: A Chihuahua unexpectedly reaches to sample a plateful of blueberry pie, vanilla blueberry swirl ice cream and fresh blueberries purchased by Jennifer Budd from the dessert tent. Jennifer’s daughter Erica is next to her mother holding their dog for a photo. The plateful of dessert delicacies was saved by a quick reaction by Jennifer.     

By Tim Gilman

 

BETHLEHEM HISTORY

Bethlehem’s first house

Because of the detailed records written by the first Moravian settlers, we know quite a bit about the first house in Bethlehem, except its exact location. Ric Rupnik, born and raised in Bethlehem and holding degrees in education, computer science and natural resource management, was intrigued by this puzzle. He came upon this mystery as he was researching historical events for his 2017 Christmas City Palette calendar. Also, Rupnik, a retired internal quality and environmental auditor who continues serving as a pastoral music minister, volunteers each year for the Christmas vespers at Central Moravian Church. At that time of year, he is always reminded of how Bethlehem was named. Photo: The yellow box on the 1885/2016 composite map shows the location of the livery stable of the Eagle Hotel, which was where the first house stood within its footprint.

By Karen M. Samuels

 

CLASSROOM

Developing a passion for reading

Students at Lehigh Valley Academy and Donegan ES were recent beneficiaries of 1,300 new books, courtesy of C&S Wholesale Grocers Inc. and the nonprofit First Book. During a reading celebration this past spring about 30 employees joined First Book representative Ellen Thomson in a visit to Donegan to deliver the donations and share reading experiences with Donegan kindergarten and first grade students. Donegan Principal Sonia Vasquez thanked C&S and First Book for getting books into the hands of students at her school. Thomson explained that First Book partnerships with businesses have donated 140 million books since the nonprofit’s founding in 1992. C&S Wholesale Grocers Inc. is the largest wholesale food distributor in the United States and employs over 1,500 at its Lehigh Valley location. Photo: First grader Angel Rosa is all ears as Giovanni Rivera reads from “Curious About Zoo Vets.”

By Dana Grubb

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Bethlehem softball camp’s a success

Future softball hopefuls from Freedom and Liberty feeder schools attended the first annual Bethlehem Sports Camps softball camp the week of July 18-22 at Freedom High School. “Joe Stellato and I did a gym class together for softball, and he said, ‘Do you want to do a camp?’” said Patriot softball coach Nora Borger, and I said, ‘Sure.’” Stellato and Borger teamed up with Liberty softball coach Sam Carrodo and signed up 48 seven through 14-year-olds, a total beyond their expectations.

By Katie McDonald

 

LV FOCUS

Young Allentown actor lands bug Disney role

In a preview for the new Disney movie, “Pete’s Dragon,” Oakes Fegley leaps off a cliff, only to be immediately swept up on the back of Elliott the Dragon. Fegley leaped off Civic Theatre of Allentown’s stage, where he appeared twice in the annual “A Christmas Carol,” including playing Tiny Tim, with his parents, actors Michael Fegley and Mercedes Tonne as Bob and Mrs. Cratchit, right onto the big screen at Civic, where a special screening of “Pete’s Dragon,” his first feature film starring role, is Aug. 11, prior to the family fantasy adventure film’s Aug. 12 opening there and at other movie theaters in the Lehigh Valley and nationwide.

By Paul Willistein

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: City secure for Musikfest

Bethlehem: YWCA to present community awards

Bethlehem: Veterans share PTSD experiences, services available

Lehigh Valley: Hotel tax change condemned by many municipalities

Hanover Township: Blue lives matter

Northampton County: LVIA flying high, again, exec tells council

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

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Friday, August 5, 2016


Thursday, August 4, 2016


August 3, 2016

COVER STORY

Celebrating ‘the Main Street Mayor’

Bethlehem said goodbye to Gordy Mowrer, known as The Main Street Mayor, in a memorial service July 26 at Bethlehem’s Central Moravian Church. Over 350 people braved 90-degree temperatures to pay their respects, but Mowrer, a former Moravian pastor known for his gentle humor, hadmanaged to prepare a surprise for them.  Photo: Guests at the celebration service for Gordon B. Mowrer inside Central Moravian Church stand for a hymn.

By Bernie O’Hare; Photos by Tim Gilman

 

NORTHMAPTON COUNTY

Problem-solving courts saves money

Problem solving courts deal proactively with the underlying reasons for criminal behavior. A person with mental illness might harass his or her neighbors. A drug addict might steal from family and friends. Both can and are often sent to jail, but unless the addiction or mental illness is addressed, jails become revolving doors for repeat offenders. It does them or their victims no good. It costs the rest of us money. Photo: Judge Craig Dally has been on the bench since 2010. He formerly served as a state representative.

By Bernie O’Hare

Related story - Recovering addict: ‘You made my life a living hell’

 

COMMUNITY

Ground broken for new police horse stable

Representatives from the City of Bethlehem, Allentown Diocese and nonprofit Friends of the Bethlehem Mounted Police gathered July 15 to officially break ground for the construction of a new facility on Diocese-owned property in Bethlehem. The 10-acre site on East Longhorne Avenue will be leased long term. Construction of a new multipurpose barn that includes office space, seven stalls, shower facilities, public atrium and meeting room will begin almost immediately, with completion expected in October, according to Tom Tenges, the president of the Friends. Photo: Project architect Christofer Portner, Reverend Monsignor Alfred Schlert representing the Allentown Diocese, Mayor Bob Donchez, Friends of the Bethlehem Mounted Police president Tom Tenges and Police Chief Mark DiLuzio are joined by officers Leaser, Waldich and Buskirk on Grey, George and Pharaoh to officially break ground.

By Dana Grubb

 

ENTERTAINMENT

Musikfest  readies for 33rd opening

largest free music festival in the nation, kicks off Friday with more than 500 free performances and ticketed headline shows during its 10-day run. Celebrating its 33rd year, the festival reaches out to families and other visitors from Pennsylvania, New Jersey and beyond. Photo: Food vendor Mark Suchter prepares his booth at Festplatz for opening day. Suchter operates Shookie’s desserts and “meals in a cup.”  “It’s been about 20 years that I’ve been involved with Musikfest as a vendor,” said the Clark Summit resident.

By Tim Gilman

 

PEOPLE

Eagle Scout’s project benefits Sayre Child Center

Geoffery Baser’s Eagle Scout project included landscaping the front of Sayre Child Center. Baser puts the finishing touches on the fieldstone wall that he and other scouts from Troop 318 worked on. 

By Dana Grubb

 

DINING

‘Freshness, quality, simplicity’

Celebrity chef Emeril Lagasse opened his 12th restaurant recently with the addition of Emeril’s Fish House at the Sands Bethlehem Casino. The new restaurant joins Lagasse’s Emeril’s Chop House and Burgers and More by Emeril at the casino resort, and repurposes the former Emeril’s Italian Table. Lagasse says the fish concept has been something he’s wanted to undertake for 22 years because of his connection to the sea and enjoyment of fishing. Photo: Sands president Mark Juliano welcomes Chef Emeril Lagasse during a recent media luncheon.

By Dana Grubb

 

STEEL STACKS

Strut your Mutt

For the contestants and their owners, it was a chance to show off their good looks and talent. For the dog lovers in the audience, it was a chance to take in 100 dogs, large and small, of various breeds. The atmosphere was festive at the first At the Strut Your Mutt competition at the SteelStacks’ “Levitt Paw-vilion” June 30, dogs and owners could compete in one or more of six contest categories: Most Look-alike, Best Trick, Best Costume, Best Rescue Dog, Cutest Puppy, and Most Awesomest Dog Ever.

By Dorothy and Dennis Glew

 

BETHLEHEM HISTORY

Remembering the Black Tom explosion

In 1884, the last male heir of the Packer line, Harry E. Packer died at the age of 33. Leadership of all Asa Packer family interests passed to his nephew, Elisha Packer Wilbur, 51, who accepted the presidency at the Lehigh Valley Railroad headquarters on Brighton Street in South Bethlehem. With power came prestige and Wilbur’s ascent appeared in social columns of the Bethlehem Globe. In winter of 1892, the fifth son of E.P.Wilbur, 20-year old Ray joined his family at the “Titchfield,” a 400-room luxury hotel overlooking the harbor town of Port Antonio in Portland Parish, Jamaica. The hotel catered to patrons who could afford the time, the passage and the privilege of dining on the hotel’s spacious verandahs. At evening parties, a gentleman’s attire indicated his affluence and financial success – his wife wore the jewels to verify it. Photo: Within a mile of Black Tom center, the explosion practically leveled all warehouses and burned barges.

By Ken Raniere

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS/Freedom HS Athletes of the Year

Yocum’s MVP year led team on the field

By Peter Car

Alexis Szaro carried workload with success

By Katie McDonald

 

LV FOCUS

It’s Musikfest Time!

Musikfest 2016 features more than 550 performances on 15 stages during 10 days on Bethlehem’s North and South Sides. More than 500 of the performances are free. Ten nights of ticketed headliner concerts at the festival’s Sands Steel Stage include: X-Ambassadors, Rachel Platten, Aug. 5; Run-DMC, Aug. 6; Dierks Bentley, Aug. 7; Boston, Aug. 9; Don Henley, Aug. 10; Bush, Chevelle, Aug. 11; Sabrina Carpenter, Aug. 12; Lady Antebellum, Aug. 13, and The Avett Brothers, Aug. 14.

By PaulWillistein

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: Meeting introduces Citizens’ Police Academy

Bethlehem: Library book sale successful

Bethlehem: AAUW honors Blauth and Conneen

Bethlehem: Beat the heat

Northampton County: Car registration fee gets the ax

Northampton County: County fairs poorly in state grants

Saucon Valley: Board approves surplus books

Opinion: Helping children cope with unsettling times

Opinion: Despite tax issues, Allen confirmed

School: Nitschmann MS Geogrpahy Bee winners

School: Marvine ES students learn about business world

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

To advertise: Ad staff

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