OUR 10TH YEAR OF SERVICE
TO THE CITY OF BETHLEHEM, BETHLEHEM AND HANOVER TOWNSHIPS AND THE BOROUGHS OF FOUNTAIN HILL, FREEMANSBURG AND HELLERTOWN

Phone: 610-625-2121 FAX: 610-625-2126 gtaylor@tnonline.com

Tuesday, September 20, 2016


September 21, 2016

COVER STORY

Valley epidemic

‘Wake up! It is here; it is now’

There is an epidemic spreading in the Lehigh Valley. It attacks primarily women, teenagers   and children, especially the most vulnerable. Its victims come from all walks of life and socio-economic backgrounds. It is highly infectious, but too often goes undetected. To date, prevention has been mostly futile, and cures have been limited to a relative few. It is not the Zika or Ebola viruses, but it is just as insidious and horrific. This epidemic is sex trafficking, defined by the Federal Government as the illegal trade in which a commercial sex act is induced by force, fraud or coercion, or in which the person induced to perform such act has not attained 18 years of age. Fed by pornography and greed, empowered by drugs, and transmitted through the Internet, this contagion is an increasing threat in the Lehigh Valley.

Part 1 of a 3-part series by Carole Gorney

 

Jane’s story: It started on a Allentown street corner

Jane Guerio is the founder and president of Glory House, which promotes spiritual restoration and economic empowerment for women getting out of captivity, abuse or homelessness.  Guerio is also a survivor of sex trafficking.  This is her story. 

The Abduction

I was 30 and I was abducted from Eighth Street and Turner in Allentown. I was a drug addict and a prostitute. It was Christmas morning. I had stolen a can of chicken noodle soup from the 7-Eleven, but I didn’t have a can opener. This big SUV drove up. One man. He said, “You won’t have to do anything the rest of the day. Come with me.”

By Carole Gorney

 

BUSINESS

Re-purpose, reuse and recycle

The Beleno Spiritual Healing Center is open for business at 1019 W. Broad St., and for owner Carrie Beleno the progression to this point has seemed to be her destiny. As a retired educator, she says a former client inspired her to step into the spiritual avocation.“I needed to step into what my purpose was and own it,” says Beleno. Photo: Natural light floods the upstairs Yoga room as Carrie Beleno relaxes quietly at her center.

By Dana Grubb

 

PEOPLE

Frank Flisser: Like father, like son

The Rev. Frank Flisser was the pastor at St. John’s Windish Lutheran Church, located on Bethlehem’s Southside, for 35 years. He also served on the zoning hearing board, and for 35 years, with the Bethlehem Housing Authority. While this community-minded cleric attended meetings, his son Frank started hanging around with a short but determined basketball player named John Morganelli and another kid just down the street named Bob Donchez. Photo: Frank Flisser, flanked by wife Mary Beth and son Tom. Flisser as Northampton County’s first council clerk, a position he held for 36 years before retiring last year.

By Bernie O’Hare

 

THE GREAT ALLENTOWN FAIR

Gonzalez newest Valley Iron Chef

A new Iron Chef was crowned at the Great Allentown Fair this summer after a grueling schedule of cook-offs featuring some of the best chefs in the Lehigh Valley. Six chefs competed in the final round, and the contest came down to two finalists:   Cristian Gonzalez, executive sous chef at the Hamilton in Allentown; and Adam Boyd, chef de cuisine at h20 Kitchen, Wyomissing. The pair were given a basket of ingredients to use to prepare one entrée from either pork or alligator meat. Photo: The Hamilton’s Executive Sous chef Cristia Gonzalez walked off, or rather, cooked-off with the title of Iron Chef at this year’s competition at the Great Allentown Fair.  He beat out five other chefs to take the title.

By Carole Gorney

 

Spam a lot at the fair

The versatility of SPAM, the ubiquitous canned meat from Hormel, was put to the test during the “Great American SPAM Championship” at the Allentown Fair. Five children and 16 adults vied for cash prizes with their sweet or savory original recipes made from at least one 12-ounce can of any variety of the precooked product. Entries ranged from SPAM salad to appetizers and a chocolate dessert. They were judged on the creativity of their theme (40 percent), taste and presence of the SPAM flavor (40 percent), ease and clarity of the recipe (10 percent), and presentation and visual appeal (10 percent). Photo: Judges Harvey Emert, Catasauqua, and Bill White, Allentown Morning Call columnist, are hard at work tasting all the SPAM entries. This is White’s 15th year as a fair culinary judge. “When I heard about the SPAM contest I just had to do it,” White said. “My mother made SPAM.”

By Carole Gorney

 

Barnyard fun

Rachael Hoffman from Slatington tries her hand at milking a “cow.” The experience left her “udderly” amazed.

By Ed Courrier

 

Food, fun and families

Kassandra Diehl of Coopersburg and her son Blake have their first camel ride. The popular camel rides attracted a steady line of fair-goers.

By Tim Gilman

 

OPINION/ANALYSIS

Gerrymandering: Current system is a mess

Whether they love her or hate her, few would dispute that Democrat Lisa Boscola is very popular in her state senatorial district, which includes Bethlehem. Some of her Bethlehem constituents may actually love her. But leaders in the state house and senate? Not so much. “I swear, if there was a bridge you could build to New Jersey, they’d put me there,” she only half-jokes. That bridge might be under construction right now. Boscola is the prime sponsor of a senate bill (SB484) that would eliminate gerrymandering in Pennsylvania by establishing an independent citizens’ commission to draw the boundary lines for Congressional and state legislative seats every 10 years.

Part 2 of a 4-part series by Bernie O’Hare

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Becahi-Liberty highlights week 5

All eyes will be focused on Bethlehem Area School District Stadium this Saturday afternoon when Bethlehem Catholic hosts Liberty at 2 p.m. It’s fair to say that calling this week four tilt a ‘big game’ is an understatement, as the rivalry between both schools is real. “All the talk or stuff on Twitter this week doesn’t matter,” said Becahi head coach Kyle Haas. “This is a huge rivalry and there’s going to be a lot of emotion going into it, but the only thing that matters for us is execution.”

By Peter Car

 

LV FOCUS

To be Latin and an artist

“Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art,” a traveling exhibit organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum, through Oct. 2, Allentown Art Museum of the Lehigh Valley, Fifth and Court streets, Allentown, includes 89 contemporary artworks by 71 artists in the Museum’s Trexler Hall, Scheller, Rodale, and Fowler Galleries. What does a Latino artist do when uprooted and transported to the United States’ landscape of political structures? They make their presence known through the arts. “Our America” is a perspective on contemporary art and artists’ approach to address the political issues of the day affecting Latino communities.

By Nelson Quinones

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: Just Borne ‘tarnished’ in community, says labor rep

Bethlehem: HARB approves CFS, Buxmont signage

Fountain Hill: New officer welcomed; plants rejected

Northampton County: No grounds for dismissal of county employee

Northampton County: Council to hold ‘remote’ meetings

Saucon Valley: High school principal resigns abruptly

Valley: TPA presents family scholarships

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

To advertise: Ad staff

Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter







 

September 21, 2016

COVER STORY

Valley epidemic

‘Wake up! It is here; it is now’

There is an epidemic spreading in the Lehigh Valley. It attacks primarily women, teenagers   and children, especially the most vulnerable. Its victims come from all walks of life and socio-economic backgrounds. It is highly infectious, but too often goes undetected. To date, prevention has been mostly futile, and cures have been limited to a relative few. It is not the Zika or Ebola viruses, but it is just as insidious and horrific. This epidemic is sex trafficking, defined by the Federal Government as the illegal trade in which a commercial sex act is induced by force, fraud or coercion, or in which the person induced to perform such act has not attained 18 years of age. Fed by pornography and greed, empowered by drugs, and transmitted through the Internet, this contagion is an increasing threat in the Lehigh Valley.

Part 1 of a 3-part series by Carole Gorney

 

Jane’s story: It started on a Allentown street corner

Jane Guerio is the founder and president of Glory House, which promotes spiritual restoration and economic empowerment for women getting out of captivity, abuse or homelessness.  Guerio is also a survivor of sex trafficking.  This is her story. 

The Abduction

I was 30 and I was abducted from Eighth Street and Turner in Allentown. I was a drug addict and a prostitute. It was Christmas morning. I had stolen a can of chicken noodle soup from the 7-Eleven, but I didn’t have a can opener. This big SUV drove up. One man. He said, “You won’t have to do anything the rest of the day. Come with me.”

By Carole Gorney

 

BUSINESS

Re-purpose, reuse and recycle

The Beleno Spiritual Health Center is open for business at 1109 W. Broad St., and for owner Carrie Beleno the progression to this point has seemed to be her destiny. As a retired educator, she says a former client inspired her to step into the spiritual avocation.“I needed to step into what my purpose was and own it,” says Beleno. Photo: Natural light floods the upstairs Yoga room as Carrie Beleno relaxes quietly at her center.

By Dana Grubb

 

PEOPLE

Frank Flisser: Like father, like son

The Rev. Frank Flisser was the pastor at St. John’s Windish Lutheran Church, located on Bethlehem’s Southside, for 35 years. He also served on the zoning hearing board, and for 35 years, with the Bethlehem Housing Authority. While this community-minded cleric attended meetings, his son Frank started hanging around with a short but determined basketball player named John Morganelli and another kid just down the street named Bob Donchez. Photo: Frank Flisser, flanked by wife Mary Beth and son Tom. Flisser as Northampton County’s first council clerk, a position he held for 36 years before retiring last year.

By Bernie O’Hare

 

THE GREAT ALLENTOWN FAIR

Gonzalez newest Valley Iron Chef

A new Iron Chef was crowned at the Great Allentown Fair this summer after a grueling schedule of cook-offs featuring some of the best chefs in the Lehigh Valley. Six chefs competed in the final round, and the contest came down to two finalists:   Cristian Gonzalez, executive sous chef at the Hamilton in Allentown; and Adam Boyd, chef de cuisine at h20 Kitchen, Wyomissing. The pair were given a basket of ingredients to use to prepare one entrée from either pork or alligator meat. Photo: The Hamilton’s Executive Sous chef Cristia Gonzalez walked off, or rather, cooked-off with the title of Iron Chef at this year’s competition at the Great Allentown Fair.  He beat out five other chefs to take the title.

By Carole Gorney

 

Spam a lot at the fair

The versatility of SPAM, the ubiquitous canned meat from Hormel, was put to the test during the “Great American SPAM Championship” at the Allentown Fair. Five children and 16 adults vied for cash prizes with their sweet or savory original recipes made from at least one 12-ounce can of any variety of the precooked product. Entries ranged from SPAM salad to appetizers and a chocolate dessert. They were judged on the creativity of their theme (40 percent), taste and presence of the SPAM flavor (40 percent), ease and clarity of the recipe (10 percent), and presentation and visual appeal (10 percent). Photo: Judges Harvey Emert, Catasauqua, and Bill White, Allentown Morning Call columnist, are hard at work tasting all the SPAM entries. This is White’s 15th year as a fair culinary judge. “When I heard about the SPAM contest I just had to do it,” White said. “My mother made SPAM.”

By Carole Gorney

 

Barnyard fun

Rachael Hoffman from Slatington tries her hand at milking a “cow.” The experience left her “udderly” amazed.

By Ed Courrier

 

Food, fun and families

Kassandra Diehl of Coopersburg and her son Blake have their first camel ride. The popular camel rides attracted a steady line of fair-goers.

By Tim Gilman

 

OPINION/ANALYSIS

Gerrymandering: Current system is a mess

Whether they love her or hate her, few would dispute that Democrat Lisa Boscola is very popular in her state senatorial district, which includes Bethlehem. Some of her Bethlehem constituents may actually love her. But leaders in the state house and senate? Not so much. “I swear, if there was a bridge you could build to New Jersey, they’d put me there,” she only half-jokes. That bridge might be under construction right now. Boscola is the prime sponsor of a senate bill (SB484) that would eliminate gerrymandering in Pennsylvania by establishing an independent citizens’ commission to draw the boundary lines for Congressional and state legislative seats every 10 years.

Part 2 of a 4-part series by Bernie O’Hare

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Becahi-Liberty highlights week 5

All eyes will be focused on Bethlehem Area School District Stadium this Saturday afternoon when Bethlehem Catholic hosts Liberty at 2 p.m. It’s fair to say that calling this week four tilt a ‘big game’ is an understatement, as the rivalry between both schools is real. “All the talk or stuff on Twitter this week doesn’t matter,” said Becahi head coach Kyle Haas. “This is a huge rivalry and there’s going to be a lot of emotion going into it, but the only thing that matters for us is execution.”

By Peter Car

 

LV FOCUS

To be Latin and an artist

“Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art,” a traveling exhibit organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum, through Oct. 2, Allentown Art Museum of the Lehigh Valley, Fifth and Court streets, Allentown, includes 89 contemporary artworks by 71 artists in the Museum’s Trexler Hall, Scheller, Rodale, and Fowler Galleries. What does a Latino artist do when uprooted and transported to the United States’ landscape of political structures? They make their presence known through the arts. “Our America” is a perspective on contemporary art and artists’ approach to address the political issues of the day affecting Latino communities.

By Nelson Quinones

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: Just Borne ‘tarnished’ in community, says labor rep

Bethlehem: HARB approves CFS, Buxmont signage

Fountain Hill: New officer welcomed; plants rejected

Northampton County: No grounds for dismissal of county employee

Northampton County: Council to hold ‘remote’ meetings

Saucon Valley: High school principal resigns abruptly

Valley: TPA presents family scholarships

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

To advertise: Ad staff

Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter







 

Tuesday, September 13, 2016


September 14, 2016

COVER STORY

A kiss on the cheek

There are very few people who have ever been able to say they kissed a real saint, but retired Bethlehem teacher Nancy Kembel is someone who can. Forty-four years ago she kissed Mother Teresa of Calcutta on the cheek, then called the world-famous missionary “a living saint in our midst.” How right Kembel was.  On Sept. 4, just 19 years after her death, Mother Teresa was officially canonized a saint by the Roman Catholic Church. Photo: At home in Bethlehem, Nancy Kembel displays the framed photos of her 1972 meeting with Mother Teresa in Philadelphia.

By Carole Gorney

 

BETHLEHEM

Just Born strike: ‘It’s corporate greed’

After months of inconclusive negotiations the hourly workers of Just Born Inc., the popular candy company, went on strike last week. Dozens of picketers can be seen outside the Stefko Boulevard building each day, braving the heat while encouraged by honking motorists. About 400 of the company’s 600 employees, members of the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union Local #6, voted unanimously to strike after rejecting the company’s latest offer, which they say would eliminate the workers’ pension plan, offer substandard wage increases and increase healthcare costs. Photo: Hourly workers protest the company’s last proposed deal as cars pass by, honking encouragement.

By Nate Jastrzemski

 

BETHLEHEM

Families, food and festival fun

The 55th annual Muhlenberg Summer Festival attracted familes and senior citizens to the popular seasonal celebration which offers live music, a juried arts and crafts show, food, children’s activities and midway games and rides. The four-day extravaganza on the grounds of the Lehigh Valley Hospital - Muhlenberg in Bethlehem features free admission and parking. The annual event is a major fundraiser for the hospital to support projects, programs and services for its patients. The festival customarily follows Musikfest, with a Wednesday through Saturday schedule. Photo: Gabby Rodriguez is all smiles after winning an inflatable monkey prize. The youngster was with her grandmother Lydia Barreto of Northampton, who said it was their first time at the festival.

By Tim Gilman

 

COMMUNITY

Knights sale benefits needy

Despite the high heat and humidity, the fourth annual Knights of Columbus yard sale at St. Anne’s Church Aug. 20 drew a steady stream of customers. In addition to members of the parish, people driving along Washington Avenue between Linden Street and Easton Avenue spotted the sale and pulled over to shop. Items on sale were practical, including kitchen utensils, furniture, and tools; and decorative, such as vases, framed pictures, and Christmas ornaments. There were toys, pocketbooks, lamps, flower pots and luggage. Beneficiaries of the sale include Mary’s Shelter, Coats for Kids, ARC of the Lehigh Valley, Special Olympics, St. Anne’s Parish, and homeless shelters in Bethlehem and Allentown. In addition, the Knights have made donations to meet urgent needs as they have arisen, such as the $500 they donated to fire victims.

By Dorothy and Dennis Glew

 

SOUTH BETHLEHEM

New Career Link office opens

Lorna Velasquez, executive director of the Hispanic Center Lehigh Valley, welcomed Nancy Dischinat (left), executive director of the Lehigh Valley Workforce Development Board Inc. to its new location at the Hispanic Center’s facility. Other speakers included Bethlehem Mayor Bob Donchez, Northampton County Executive John Brown, Hispanic Center Lehigh Valley vice chair Donna Taggart and Luis Campos, board chair of the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.

By Dana Grubb

 

CLASSROOM

Northeast MS marks 9/11 anniversary

Each year Northeast MS remembers the tragic events of Sept. 11, 2001 with a short ceremony for students and neighbors. This 15th anniversary of 9/11 was marked by early morning remarks and music, and at least one considered reflection about what that day meant and how these young men and women should approach the future. Principal Joseph Rahs said, “Bringing you out here today in this heat, and with these bugs, is to tell you it’s important that you learn the lessons of the past. We as your adults have failed to bring peace to this Earth. We don’t want you to fail. You must never forget the horrific events of 9/11 and other tragedies that have occurred since. Someday we can live together as one.” Photo: The entire student body, faculty, administrators, family and local volunteers crowd the bus port during the performance of the “Star Spangled Banner.”

By Nate Jastrzemski

 

NEWS ANALYSIS

Gerrymandering: Elections really are rigged

Before the 2014 Pennsylvania state and congressional races, Democrats outnumbered Republicans in voter registration by a 50 to 37 percent margin. But when the election was over, Republicans occupied 60 percent of the seats in the state legislature and controlled 13 of the state’s congressional seats. How can a minority rule in a representative democracy?  That can be answered with one word. Gerrymandering.

Part 1 of a 4-part series by Bernie O’Hare

 

SOUTH BETHLEHEM

Pocket park blooms on Third

The Lehigh Valley Charter HS for the Arts’ new pocket park was finished at the Third Street building’s front corner near the end of last school year. Several clubs and classes – such as the Environmental Club and AP Biology course students – worked with administrators and even attended municipal meetings to observe the processes of getting something done with local government.

By Nate Jastrzemski

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Week 3: Football results

Easton 27, Freedom 20; Liberty 14, Parkland 6; Emmaus 34, Bethlehem Catholic 24

By Peter Car and CJ Hemerly

 


LV FOCUS

The mission expands

Miller Symphony Hall has been around a long time, long enough to go back to a time when it was probably the only game in town, and not only in Allentown, but the Lehigh Valley. Allentown Symphony Association Executive Director Sheila K. Evans is well aware that Miller Symphony Hall is now just one in a crowded field of Valley venues competing for the concert- and theater-going ticket-buying public.

By Paul Willistein

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: Book sale opens today

Bethlehem: 275th celebration event this weekend

Bethlehem: LERTA incentive zone approved

Bethlehem: Public poverty conversation Sept. 19

Bethlehem Township: Board dives into storm water fight

Fountain Hill: St. Luke’s, Geisinger partner to improve care access

Hanover Township: Supervisors honor first responders

Hanover Township: Event benefits Alzheimer’s Assoc.

Valley: Panel presses for redistricting reform

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

To advertise: Ad staff

Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter







 

Tuesday, September 6, 2016


September 7, 2016

COVER STORY

‘Thoughtful that you came to visit’

When Gertrude (Carl) Kunsman was born Aug. 26, 1911, the unsinkable ocean liner Titanic had not yet undertaken its fateful maiden voyage in 1912, and much of the twentieth century’s remarkable history was in her future. One hundred and five years later, “Gertie” was joined by family, friends, a police horse named George, and his officer partner Eric Waldeck at the portico of the Moravian Kings Daughters and Sons residence on West Market Street to celebrate her birthday.

By Dana Grubb

 

COMMUNITY

It’s back to school time!

The Bethlehem Area School District re-opened its classrooms Aug. 30 for the 2016-17 academic year. Many of the 22 schools held special back-to-school activities for the students, parents and teachers. BASD has approximately 14,000 students enrolled in the district, which strides both Northampton and Lehigh counties. The heart of the school district is in the city of Bethlehem, with other schools located in the boroughs of Fountain Hill and Freemansburg and Bethlehem and Hanover townships. The students are off for Labor Day.

By Tim Gilman

 

CLASSROOM

Off to a good start

“What a wonderful way to start off the new school year,” exclaimed Marvine ES Principal Dr. Karen Gomez. Her students were surprised at their first school year assembly with the gift of backpacks filled with school supplies courtesy of ArtSkills, an area manufacturer of arts and crafts school supplies. Photo:  Aniyah Navarro is all smiles upon receiving her school supplies.

By Dana Grubb

 

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Freedom celebrates new turf field

Bethlehem Area School District administrators and board members cut the ribbon in celebration of the new sports field at Freedom HS Aug. 19. Student band members and athletes were present to show school spirit. Left to right: Superintendent Dr. Joseph Roy, board member Craig Neiman, board member Eugene McKeon, board President Mike Faccinetto, board member Shannon Patrick, Freedom Principal Michael LaPorta and board member Dean Donaher.

By Nate Jastrzemski

 

FOUNTAIN HILL

Council covers ordinances, codes and more

Robert Schlegel, new crossing guard for the 2016-17 school year. His post will be on the corner of Broadway and Delaware.

By Tracy Rice

 

SOUTH BETHLEHEM

VegFest: Good food, music, (vegan) beer

Though it’s much smaller than Musikfest and only lasts a day, Bethlehem’s sixth annual VegFest offers many of the same charms. Delicious food. Good music. And beer. Lots of it. Most beer is vegan. So crowds grow every year for this annual celebration along the Greenway. Photo: Twenty-four Carrot and her Green Chain were on hand from South Side’s Color Me Mine, but Carrot was eaten.

By Bernie O’Hare

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Freedom, Liberty post football wins

From one big game to another, Liberty’s football team has and will be going through a series of mental and physical tests over a two weeks span. Fresh off their 28-21 victory over Easton last Friday night, Liberty now has to re-shift its focus to another test against one of District 11’s top powers, as a road trip to Parkland (2-0) is on the agenda Friday night.

 

Freedom had a week off from the rigorous confines of EPC South football, blasting Allen 48-0 in a mercy rule contest last week. Joe Young threw for 177 yards and three touchdowns, as the Patriots led 35-0 at halftime to enact the mercy rule. Now, the Patriots (2-0) will turn their focus to hosting Easton this Friday night, hoping to give the Rovers the same dose of defeat they endured at BASD Stadium a week ago in their loss to Liberty.

By Peter Car

 

LV FOCUS

Life and Love

After a season celebrating her 20th anniversary as artistic director and conductor of the Allentown Symphony Orchestra, Diane Wittry knew she wanted the 2016WW-17 season to be even more memorable. You couldn’t do better than “Lights, Camera, Oscars!” the opening Allentown Symphony Pops Series Concert, 7:30 p.m. Sept. 24, with ASO associate conductor Ronald Demkee and vocal soloists Marie Danvers and Destan Owens; the Symphony Classical Music Series Opening Gala, featuring Grammy winner jazz saxophonist Branford Marsalis as soloist for Villa-Lobos’ “Fantasia for Saxophone and Orchestra,” Oct. 15, 16, and the Symphony’s Classical Series of Elgar’s “Enigma Variations,” Nov. 5, 6.

By Paul Willistein

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: Laros grant supports new industrial museum

Bethlehem: Bikes among best tools for police

Bethlehem: 9/11 memorial events planned

Bethlehem HCC: Benner Southside office building plan approved

Bethlehem Area SD: Board seeks grants for staff, neighborhoods

Lehigh Valley: State budget gets mixed reviews

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

To advertise: Ad staff

Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter