OUR 10TH YEAR OF SERVICE
TO THE CITY OF BETHLEHEM, BETHLEHEM AND HANOVER TOWNSHIPS AND THE BOROUGHS OF FOUNTAIN HILL, FREEMANSBURG AND HELLERTOWN

Phone: 610-625-2121 FAX: 610-625-2126 gtaylor@tnonline.com

Tuesday, December 18, 2018


December 19, 2018

COVER STORY

Holiday in the Park

While the weather was cold, the approximately 35 attendees brought a good deal of holiday warmth to the annual Southside tree lighting Dec. 7 at Tranquility Park. Among them were gentlemen dressed as the Three Kings. Anna Smith, director of the Community Action Development Corporation of Bethlehem, welcomed attendees, first in English and then in Spanish. CADC sponsored the event. Photo: Where Santa is, there are also kids. In this case the kids are from the Lynfield Community Center’s after-school program. Judging by the looks on their faces, some may be naughty, not nice. Santa will have to decide. He may consult with Anna Smith (rear) of the Community Action Development Corporation of Bethlehem.

By Dorothy and Dennis Glew

 

FOUNTAIN HILL

Lighting up the borough tree

The annual Christmas tree lighting at the Tinsley-Jeter Triangle in Fountain Hill took place Dec. 4 at 4 p.m. The Broughal MS band was there to perform some holiday music. Girl Scout troop 82048 was also there to help celebrate. The American Legion  Post 406 members gave out candy and oranges to all the children. The weather held off and there was a great turnout to see the lighting of the tree. All the ornaments on the tree were made by the students of Fountain Hill ES. Photo: Mr.and Mrs. Santa Claus get a brief break from public attention during the Fountain Hill tree lighting ceremony.

By Tracy Rice

 

COMMUNITY

‘I’ve seen a lot of close calls’

For many commuters, South Mountain consists of little more than steep and winding Wyandotte Street. But around it are the various blurs that make up its cliffside neighborhoods, rarely acknowledged by harried drivers, but deeply affected by traffic’s influence. On one small street in particular, residents are worried that an accident is inevitable; one involving a car and a child. Photo: Standing watch outside his home on Sassafrass Street every evening from 4-6 p.m., Jan David Sabin warns drivers to slow down.

By Nate jastrzemski

 

PEOPLE

Lemonade stand benefits K-9 unit

Nine-year-old Brooklyn Pronovich paid a visit to Bethlehem Mayor Bob Donchez’s office recently to drop off a check. Her ‘Brooklyn’s Lemonade Stand’ earned $1,205 in August, the proceeds dedicated to the city’s four dog K-9 Police Unit. Accompanied by dad Jeff, mom Kassie and younger sister Raelynn, Brooklyn, a fourth grade elementary student shyly chatted with Donchez before turning over the check. She told Donchez, a retired teacher, that she liked her school. Photo: Police Chief Mark DiLuzio and Mayor Bob Donchez admire a check for $1,205 that nine year old Brooklyn Pronovich delivered to the City of Bethlehem’s Police K-9 Unit Oct. 29. The Farmersville ES fourth grader attended with her mother Kassie, father Jeff and younger sister Raelynn.

By Dana Grubb

 

SPORTS

Reilly new Beachi soccer coach

Bethlehem Catholic hopes Mike Reilly can give their boys’ soccer program a needed kick-start, just like he did during his two-year tenure at Notre Dame.Reilly was officially hired to take over the program last week, coming from across town with the Crusaders, where he helped the program win back-to-back District 11 2A titles for the first time in school history.

By Peter Car

 

FOCUS

About the Belsnickel

The Belsnickel used to visit the homes of Pennsylvania Dutch children many years ago.In those days, the children were often told during the year, “Du besser bischt gudt der Belsnickel kumpt.” (Loosely — you’d better be good, the Belsnickel will come.) The last sighting of Belsnickel around here reported to us was by Ruth Rinker of Sciota. She grew up in the West End of Monroe County. Ruth tells us that Belsnickel visited her home only once, in 1926. She was around 6 years old then.

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: Friends since days at Moravian Prep

Bethlehem: Library’s year-end sale set record

Bethlehem: Pathways to Santa

Bethlehem ASD: Faccinetto retains presidency

Bethlehem ASD: Sodexo vows to continue Backack Pal program

Bethlehem Catholic HS: Scholastic achievers honored

Bethlehem HCC: Grace Mansion renovations approved

HanoverTopwnship: Peddling ordinance update

Hellertown: Hughes is new council member

Lehigh County: Russell named new prison warden

LV Charter Arts HS: Faculty celebrate Blue Ribbon

Moravian Academy: Student to climb mountain for smiles

South Bethlehem: Samuelson speaks to task force

High school news report: Bethleham AVTS

Student profiles: OILivia Chhugani, Freedom HS

Police logs: Phone scam; Pedestrian struck

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

 

MEET THE PRESS





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Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

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Tuesday, December 11, 2018


December 12, 2018

C
OVER STORY

Putting the meaning back into Christmas season

The arrival of Bethlehem’s festive holiday season was officially heralded at the 53rd annual Advent Breakfast, sponsored by the Citizens Christmas City Committee (CCCC) and its Community Advent Breakfast subcommittee. More than 200 people attended the non-denominational event at Moravian Village. Besides the meal, there was seasonal music played by the Bethlehem Area Moravian Trombone Choir, along with caroling by Moravian College’s Sigma Alpha Lambda Chapter of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia.  Photo: Laviece Tribble, Lorraine Kelper and Dorise Gross participate in the individual candle-lighting ceremony during the singing of “O Little Town of Bethlehem.” Candles are a Moravian tradition, and single candles are displayed in the windows of many local homes at Christmastime.

By Carole Gorney

 

PEOPLE

Betty Bartron: 99 and still dancing

She was about to turn 99, and Jeff Bartron felt that it was time for a surprise celebration of the remarkable life of his grandmother, Betty Bartron. Betty is an enthusiastic gardener with a huge plot that she tends herself. She is an active member of the Bethlehem Garden Club.

She is also an accomplished knitter.  Photo: Not to be left out of the dancing, Betty gets out on the floor with a number of gentlemen, starting with her grandson, Mike Bartron, who helped organized the party.

By Dorothy and Dennis Glew

 

ENTERTAINMENT

Railroad museum still growing

For generations in many families, model railroading brought untold enjoyment during the Christmas season. Setting up a train platform under the Christmas tree with Lionel or HO scale trains, villages of homes and businesses, tunnels and bridges, lichen greenery and to-scale cars and trucks still brings families together. For those model railroading enthusiasts who can’t find the time or just aren’t inclined to build a model train layout, the Lehigh and Keystone Valley Model Railroad Museum at 705 Linden St. in Bethlehem offers a wonderful alternative. Photo: Nearly 2,000 engines and rolling stock are running and displayed throughout the layout.

By Dana Grubb

 

HANUKKAH

Fesitval of Lights begins in Bethlehem

Local Jewish leaders and congregants gathered Dec. 4 in Bethlehem for the 10th annual Hanukkah Menorah lighting ceremony. Rabbi Yaakov Halperin and Rabbi Michael Singer joined Bethlehem Business Manager Eric Evans on the third day of Hanukkah for a lighting of the huge Menorah that has been temporarily erected on Payrow Plaza. Evans represented Mayor Robert Donchez. Photo: The group of Jewish and government leaders are elevated to reach the lights at the top of the menorah in a Bethlehem Fire Department truck, with an extending platform operated by Firefighter Josh Freedman.

By Douglas Graves

 

COMMUNITY

Congregations host Winterfest

While the rain poured down outside, the atmosphere inside was festive, as several hundred people gathered at Bethlehem’s Light of Christ Lutheran Church to celebrate the first Winterfest. Presented by the United Proclamation of the Gospel congregations of Light of Christ and St. Peter’s Lutheran, both of Bethlehem, to celebrate the beginning of Advent, the Dec. 1 festival featured carnival-style games, a living Nativity, free food, musical performances, carols and a reading of the Nativity story. Photo: Members young and old of both Light of Christ and St. Peter’s comprise three casts for the living Nativity.

 

DOWNTOWN BETHLEHEM

Behind the scenes at Christmas Village

The Christmas City Village Weihnachtsmarkt, located in the heart of downtown Bethlehem, is a hidden gem amid the rest of the excitement from the Main Street shops. When you walk past the Tavern at the Sun Inn you enter a little village of local vendors selling a variety of products that are festive for the holiday season. The village has a serene atmosphere, with plenty of space to walk around, engage with other shoppers and vendors, and shop at a slower pace. From assorted mustards, to honey, soaps, candles, lip balms, Christmas tree trinkets, and more there are intricate gift ideas for loved ones, coworkers and friends. Photo: Herb and Beverly Cruikshank, local merchants, say, “We’re from Mountaintop. We like to come down here to shop because it has different and unique stores and it’s so festive. It is the Christmas City, with one of a kind items that are local.”

By Chloe Goldstein

 

SPORTS

Winter previews: Boys basketball

By Peter Car

 

FOCUS

50 years of ‘Nutcracker’

Celebrating the 50th annual production of “The Nutcracker,” the longest-running “Nutcracker” in the Lehigh Valley, the Ballet Guild of the Lehigh Valley and Pennsylvania Youth Ballet brings this glorious holiday ballet to Zoellner Arts Center, Bethlehem, 1 and 4 p.m. Dec 15 and and 2 p.m. Dec. 16. A 50th “Nutcracker Celebration” takes place after the Dec. 16 performance at Hotel Bethlehem. The honorary chair for the celebration is Dr. Joseph Roy, superintendent of Bethlehem Area School District.

By Camille Capriglione

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: 4-3 vote seen as failure to protect city’s integrity

Bethlehem: 100 years young at Luther Manor

Bethlehem: HARB approves window sign

Bethlehem: Library ornament aids debt reduction

Bethlehem Township: Residents face possible 9% tax hike

Bethlehem Township: KLristine Blake fills Tom Nolan’s seat

Northampton County: McClure budget has no tax increase

Lehigh County: Board approves tax rateincrease

Student profiles – Bianca Baab, LV Academy

High school news reports – Saucon Valley HS

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

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Tuesday, December 4, 2018


December 5, 2018

COVER STORY

Tucker’s ride

Over 600 bikers from the Lehigh Valley and beyond enjoyed a ride to the St. Luke’s Fountain Hill campus for the eighth annual Tucker’s Toy Ride on a breezy, sunny November day. Delivering well over 1,000 toys, which are collected throughout the year, the event is run through the Lehigh Valley Community Benefit and it remembers Tucker Stuart, who died in a motorcycle crash in 2011. PHOTO: Over 600 bikers arrive at the St. Luke’s Fountain Hill main campus to deliver toys collected in Tucker Stuart’s memory. They had started out at the Tri-Boro Sportsmen Club  in Northampton about 40 minutes before.

By Dana Grubb

 

CHRISTMAS CITY

'Tis the season

The Christmas City officially opened the season of holiday revels with its annual tree lighting festivities at Payrow Plaza Nov. 23. Administrators, sponsors, performers, school students and thousands of residents braced the toe-numbing chill with free cookies and hot chocolate during performances and sing-alongs. Mayor Bob Donchez said he is proud of a city “that celebrates Christmas in a thousand ways with lights and goodwill.” Police Chief Mark DiLuzio, who acted as emcee, said the holiday is in the very fibre of the community. “Celebrating Christmas is part of our culture and tradition,” he told the chilly throng. Photo: Pennsylvania Youth Ballet dancers brave the cold for the annual candy cane dance from “The Nutcracker” on the steps of the Bethlehem Area Public Library.

By Nate Jastrzemski

 

CHRISTMAS CITY

Elementary students help usher in season

A total of 109 third-grade students from Clearview and Thomas Jefferson elementary schools may well have saved Christmas around Bethlehem City Hall this year. Mayor Robert Donchez, who is busy running the city, didn’t have time to make ornaments for his official Christmas tree. Thankfully, these youngsters stepped up and stepped in by creating their own ornaments for the tree decorating. Photo: Santa Claus listens to gift requests from Clearview and Thomas Jefferson third-graders while Mrs. Claus looks on during the mayor’s tree decorating event held Nov. 30 at Bethlehem City Hall.

By Stephen Althouse

 

CHRISTMAS CITY

Freedom presents ‘A Christmas Carol’

The Freedom HS Theatre Company presented “A Christmas Carol” at four performances Nov. 29 through Dec. 2. Adapted from the 1843 Charles Dickens novel by Charles Ludlum for stage, the production was directed by Justin Amann, who was assisted by Natalie Parker on production, Denise Parker on vocals, Daria Hill with costumes, Christopher Domanski on set design, Priscilla Salazer on props and set painting, and Elliot Bond on special effects. A cast of over 50 students performed in the Christmas classic that sees a miserly old Scrooge reverse his greed filled ways after visits by the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present and Future. Photo: In his typical humbug fashion, Scrooge (Ryan Hill) chases a group of carolers from the front window of his counting house.

By Dana Grubb

 

VETERANS DAY

Steelstacks hosts non-profit panel

Nov. 11 is a day we spend honoring our current and former Armed Service members in many different ways. This past Veterans Day, Jenny Pacanowski, U.S. Army, founder and director of the nonprofit Women Veterans Empowered and Thriving, did so by hosting a featured panel of women veterans sharing stories, experiences, and challenges faced during deployment and after returning home. The panel was held at the ArtsQuest Center at Steelstacks and featured 3 women, Pacanowski, Corinna Louise Brown, U.S. Army, and Cheryl G. Ites, U.S. Marine Corps. The Q&A panel was hosted by veteran Tammy Barlet, U.S. Coast Guard, featuring questions regarding the transition home, women in combat roles, advice for other military women, and more. Photo: Jenny Pacanowski, sitting between Corinna Louise Brown (left) and panel host Tammy Barlet (right), explains her delpoyment and transition back home, which led her to establishing Women Veterans Empowered and Thriving.

By Alli Pozcak

 

FOUNTAIN HILL VETERANS DAY

New monument honors those who served

Fountain Hill American Legion Post 406 revealed a new Veterans Monument at the Stanley Avenue Memorial Plot during Nov. 11 ceremonies. Guests attending and participating in the ceremony included Gerhart C. Bassett, commander Post 406; James B. Taglang, Post 406 finance officer; John L. Spadaccia, judge advocate Post 406; Jose Rosado, former Fountain Hill mayor; Mayor Carolee Gifford; Boy Scout Troop 146; Fountain Hill Borough Council members; Lisa Lynch, Fountain Hill ES principal; Ned Fink, Fountain Hill mayor from 2007-10; and Francis J. Ferrincen, Fountain Hill mayor from 1994-98. The new memorial is given to Fountain Hill by the American Legion Post 406. Photo: The new memorial on Stanley Avenue was given to Fountain Hill by American Legion Post 406.

By Tracy Rice

 

SPORTS

Hawks fall to Imhotep

Bethlehem Catholic was full of hope heading into their third straight PIAA 4A semifinal with Imhotep last Friday night, but the hope turned into reality quickly in Northeast Philadelphia, as the Panthers jumped ahead early and never looked back in a 43-6 rout. It was the third straight year Becahi fell to Imhotep at this stage of the state tournament, but this year’s result was the most convincing score in the recent series.

By Peter Car

 

FOCUS

Pip the mouse is back

“Pip: The Mouse Before Christmas” has returned to its vintage stage for the 15th season at Allentown’s Liberty Bell Museum. Pip and his holiday puppet show premiered at Hess’s, Ninth and Hamilton streets, in 1962. After the iconic Allentown department store closed, puppets, props and stage found a home at the Liberty Bell Museum where the seasonal show has been going on since 2003.

By Ed Courrier

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem Area SD: Language guides get raise

Bethlehem Area SD: Partners sought to combat lunch debt

Bethlehem: HARB approves Rotunda plaza sign

South Bethlehem: CADCB briefs task force on projects

Student profiles – Isabella Trauger, LV Academy

High school news reports – LV Academy notes

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers


MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

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Tuesday, November 27, 2018


November 28, 2018

COVER STORY

Christkindlmarkt brings in another holiday season

With the busy holiday season upon us, shoppers hoping to start Christmas early  headed to the four enormous heated tents at SteelStacks known as ArtsQuest’s Christkindlmarkt Nov. 16, the day it opened.  There they found a huge collection of goods to choose from, including, but not limited to, apparel for people of all ages, toys, jewelry, dolls and doll clothes, soaps and lotions, wine, candy, and all manner of decorative objects. As in previous years, visitors pored over K├Ąthe Wohlfahrt’s huge collection of beautifully crafted wooden hand-painted Christmas ornaments, including creche scenes, Christmas tree ornaments and cuckoo clocks. Photo: Everything Wendy Jones sells, from frogs to wolves, makes the sound of its species, from tiny croaks to loud howls.

By Dorothy and Dennis Glew

 

ANOTHER VIEW/ED’S WORLD

Graphic commentary by Ed Courrier

 

COMMUNITY

A personal Eagle project

Two years ago, Christopher Fereno earned his Eagle Scout badge, the highest rank attainable. Now it’s his brother Zachary’s turn. Zachary did his project in honor of his cousin, who passed away at York Hospital’s neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) when she was just 2 months old. It’s called “Gifts from Angels: In Memory of Audrey Grace.” Photo: Zachary Fereno with Lehigh Valley Hospital neonatal intensive care unit staff members and the 1,826 caps the scout delivered as part of his Eagle Scout project.

 

COMMUNITY

Club that beats the streets

Some 160 people, young and old, from many cultural, racial and ethnic backgrounds, gathered in the Grand Ballroom of the Hotel Bethlehem to celebrate an institution that serves all young people and binds them together, the Boys and Girls Club of Bethlehem, now 88 years old. Built next to the  Marvine/Pembroke Village Housing Development, the club is open to kids ages 6-18.

Photo: When the kids arrived for dinner, things got lively. Did they want to have their picture taken with legendary Phillie Larry Bowa? You be the judge.

By Dennis Glew

 

SPORTS

Hawks are moving on

You can’t really label a series of games between two teams as a rivalry unless one side has tasted defeat, but perhaps from a Bethlehem Catholic point-of-view, this week’s matchup with Imhotep Charter in the PIAA 4A state tournament is just as big, or bigger than any Liberty or Freedom city showdown. The Golden Hawks (11-3) will make another trip down the turnpike this Friday night to Northeast High School to face Imhotep (11-2) for the third straight year in the state semifinals at 7 p.m.

By Peter Car

 

LV FOCUS

‘26 Pebbles’

A Parkland High School production of “26 Pebbles,” a play about a very difficult topic, the 2012 shooting of 20 students and six adult staff members at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., will get a statewide audience Dec. 1. Mark A Stutz, Director of Visual and Performing Arts, Parkland School District, is hoping the student production could even reach a national audience. “We felt it was a message that needed to be brought to as many people as we could,” Stutz says of the Parkland production, which he directed.

By Kathy Lauer-Williams

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: Last book sale of year opens Nov. 28

Bethlehem Area SD: Worker’s comp costs increase

Bethlehem Township: Viet vet keynote speaker at service

Bethlehem: Social Still llauded for donation

Fountain Hill: Bacchanalia committee give back

Hellertown: Lott leaves for NORCO Council

Lehigh Valley: Election results mixes, columnist says

Lehigh Valley: LVHN receives hugh gift; renames children’s hospital

Lehigh Valley: Eagles land at Martin Guitar

Lehigh Valley: Meals on Wheels merger

Lehigh Valley: Area residents in Players production

Student profiles – Mary Frances Scheidel

High school news reports – Bethlehem Catholic HS

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

To advertise: Ad staff

Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter