OUR 7TH YEAR OF SERVICE
TO THE CITY OF BETHLEHEM, BETHLEHEM AND HANOVER TOWNSHIPS AND THE BOROUGHS OF FOUNTAIN HILL, FREEMANSBURG AND HELLERTOWN

308 East Third Street, Bethlehem PA 18015
Hours: Monday through Friday 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Phone: 610-625-2121 FAX: 610-625-2126 gtaylor@tnonline.com

Thursday, September 11, 2014

September 10, 2014

COVER STORY
Saluting the laborer
The 6th annual Steelworkers and Friends Labor Day parade stepped off Aug. 31 in downtown Bethlehem. According to Jerry Green, longtime president of USW local 2599 which organizes the event, “A very successful parade with the most participants and public I’ve seen.” Photo: United Steelworkers contingent leads the Labor Day parade in downtown Bethlehem on August 31. Local 2599 president Jerry Green marches behind a USW banner with microphone in hand.
By Tim Gilman



PEOPLE
No place, like home
A delightful evening of county, gospel and old time music was shared at Wesley United Methodist Church recently, when Bethlehem native Merv Shiner returned from Tampa for his Homecoming Concert Part II - The Journey Continues. Photo: Bethlehem native Merv Shiner tells a story between musical numbers. Shiner returned to Bethlehem to perform a 30th anniversary concert.
Jason Rehm



LEHIGH VALLEY
A global, miracle match
The Taney Dragons may be Philadelphia’s sweetheart in baseball, but here in the Lehigh Valley we have the Miracle League, where every child has the opportunity to hit, score, and win.  The children who make up the Miracle League are special needs children or children with developmental disabilities. The league provides them with the opportunity to play baseball. There were approximately seventy children involved this year. Photo: Matteo Turkovic of Croatia helps Lexie as she swings at the green ball during her turn up to bat.
By Linda Anthony



SOUTHSIDE
Downtown to get caretakers
For a second week Mayor Bob Donchez was joined by Lehigh University and other local officials to announce a public safety initiative centered on Downtown Southside. Photo:
By Nate Jastremski


THIS WEEK IN BETHLEHEM SPORTS
‘Pates show off potential
The points came in droves and the smiles went from ear-to-ear, but Freedom’s football team knows it’s just another step in the right direction to winning back the Patriot family following last Friday night’s 67-34 thumping over Nazareth (0-2).
By Peter Car

OTHER STORIES
Bethlehem: Mayor seeks ticket tax hike
Bethlehem: Fall book sale opens Sept. 17
Bethlehem: Exploring artistic interests
Fountain Hill: Researcher remembered with research, scholarship award
Northampton County: Council fails to over ride Brown veto
Northampton County: Community activist tapped for LANTA Board


WEEKLY FEATURES
Around town community calendar
Police logs
Area obituaries
Center for Animal Health and Welfare
Volunteers
Student profiles
High school news reports

The Bethlehem Press online
Where to buy the Bethlehem Press
To subscribe: New start
Send news to the Bethlehem Press
To advertise: Ad staff
Follow us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter

Thursday, September 4, 2014


September 3, 2014

ON THE GROUND
South Bethlehem VegFest
First-time VegFest visitor Christy Hume of Bethlehem Township tries a loaded vegan chili dog from Heavenly Hot Dogs at the festival which features vegetarian and natural food.
By Tim Gilman







IN THE AIR
LV Air Show
Ezekial Knerr looks a little tentative as he poses for a photo in the port engine of a Federal Express 757 transport that was part of the Lehigh Valley Air Show’s static ground display.
By Dana Grubb








BETHLEHEM
City, Lehigh embrace public safety
City and Lehigh University officials announced Aug. 26 they are redoubling their integrated policing of the Southside neighborhoods near the campus. Photo: Mayor Bob Donchez with Police Chief Mark DiLuzio, Lehigh President Kevin Clayton, Lehigh Police Chief Ed Shupp and student Kerry Mallett.
By Nate Jastrzemski


BETHLEHEM TOWNSHIP
Bird lovers squawk at plan
Controversial plans for a senior living community in Bethlehem Township, next to the Green Pond Golf Course made their way to commissioners at their Aug. 18 meeting. They were first presented to a skeptical Planning Commission in late July before a packed house. Photo: Lehigh Valley Audubon’s Scott Burnet, with the American Coot, one of 162 species that can be seen at green Pond Marsh.
By Bernie O’Hare




GARDEN CLUB
Back to the ‘Roaring 20s’
Sauntering back into another era, the Bethlehem Garden Club presented a themed flower show recently featuring "The Roaring 20s" at Hotel Bethlehem. Displays included horticulture and design and special exhibits of '20s headwear. The art of Ikebana, (living flowers which is the Japanese art of flower arrangement) was presented along with native plants and distinctive fashions from Ellie Laubner's noted collection. Photo: This display is fresh from the garden – a vegetable cloche.
By Ruth Grady




CLASSROOM
When wall space meets talent
Bethlehem Area School District’s Education Center’s walls have been brightened by the efforts of students throughout the district’s elementary, middle and high schools. Mosaics created using a variety of materials have been permanently installed and BASD Superintendent Dr. Joseph Roy considers the work to be of “amazing quality.” Photo: BASD art teacher and outgoing Nitschmann MS eighth graders Olivia Lunger and Ruby Funk show off their mosaic. Students used ceramic tiles and glass to depict the world and the positive impact that they expect to have in it.
By Dana Grubb

THIS WEEK IN BETHLEHEM SPORTS
Simmons helps Hawks fly past ‘Canes
If there was one thing to take away from last Friday’s Bethlehem brawl between Liberty and Bethlehem Catholic, it’s to not kick the football to Becahi’s Freddie Simmons
By Peter Car


THIS WEEK IN FOCUS
Symphony Hall season starts early
It is always something to look forward to.
The summer is over. Vacations are a fading memory. Across the country, school has started. Things at work begin to get busy again. And all of us, hopefully rested from weekends at the shore or in the mountains, are ready to start a new season.
By Diane Wittry


OTHER STORIES
Northampton County: Council review jail rehab programs
Pa. Turnpike: We could see 70 mph in the spring
Lehigh Valley: Car enthusiasts enjoy Wheels of Time

WEEKLY FEATURES
Around town community calendar
Police logs
Area obituaries
Center for Animal Health and Welfare
Volunteers
Student profiles
High school news reports

The Bethlehem Press online
Where to buy the Bethlehem Press
To subscribe: New start
Send news to the Bethlehem Press
To advertise: Ad staff
Follow us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter

Thursday, August 28, 2014


Aug. 27, 2014
The Bethlehem Press online


COVER STORY
Meals on Wheels gets a fresh look
Meals on Wheels of Northampton County chefs George Liros and Bob Adams, along with Nick Nonnemacher, MOW’s director of Food Services, admire the home-delivery service’s new logo at the 4240 Fritch Drive facility in Bethlehem. The modern leaf design replaces the old wheel logo.
By Carol Smith


FOUNTAIN HILL
Medical office building proposed
Dr. Hayman Salib, MD, bought the property at 736 Delaware Ave. eight years ago and now plans to tear down the current residence and replace it with an office building.
By Courtney Keenan

DOWNTOWN
Lion fans party—new ice cream Shoppe opens
Wearing a PSU cheer outfit, Lila Parsons stands with the Nittany Lion in downtown Bethlehem during the Penn State Lehigh Valley Day activities. The girl was with her family from Lower Saucon Township. Matt Parsons, her father, is a Penn State alumnus.
By Tim Gilman







NORTHAMPTON
New sheriff in town
As his daughters hold a Bible supplied by President Judge Stephen Baratta, David Dalrymple is sworn in as Northampton County Sheriff on Aug. 11. A former Major in the New Jersey State Police, he was confirmed by county council in July. The ceremony was attended by about 40 supporters, many of them deputies.
By Bernie O’Hare


COMMUNITY
Family day doubles as blood drive
There was a little something for everyone at the Heights Federal Credit Union Aug. 21 as the organization sponsored a blood drive and coupled it with a kids day event. The family-oriented and community-spirited credit union offered face painting in the lobby, had clowns greeters at the door, beverages and grilled hot dogs. The Miller-Keystone Bloodmobile vehicle was parked on the access drive and 14 pre-registered donors gave blood. ABOVE: Giggles the Clown paints five-year-old Anthony Cruz’s face like Spider-Man. Cruz’s mother, Jessica Rivera, is a credit union member and they reside in Bethlehem.
By Dana Grubb


PEOPLE
Back in the day of Moses
Children attending the Bethany UCC Vacation Bible School this summer experienced an Israelite Camp designed to reflect the time of Moses. About 45 kids aged 3 to 12 donned costumes of that time during each evening’s session in July. VBS director Diane Yocum said the encampment harkens back to the old world and doubles as a fundraiser for Operation Kid-to-Kid, where money raised helps children in under-privileged countries learn to purify water supplies. Photo: Tom Hoffert (Moses) tells the children in his tent, “God gives us what we need.”
By Dana Grubb

COMMUNITY
Sale benefits VBS program
Bethany U.C.C. held a rummage sale in its Fellowship Hall at 600 W. Market St. June 28.  The event helped defray the cost of the Wilderness Escape Vacation Bible School. Leftovers were offered at a second sale Aug. 22-23. The children of the Sunday school program wanted to raise money and awareness for pediatric cancer. Photo: Philip Haines serves clam chowder to a customer.
By Ruth Grady





PEOPLE
Failure part of success, says coach
When she was in the seventh grade, Megan Dellegrotti experienced her first big disappointment when she was passed over for a basketball team on which all her friends were playing. Crushed, she was ready to pack it in, but her father gave her a dose of reality. Unlike her friends, she had been playing for only a year. Photo: Megan Dellegrotti, head girls basketball coach at Becahi, coached at Southern Lehigh for five seasons, leading those teams to three Colonial League Championships and a 104-28 record.
By Bernie O’Hare


THIS WEEK IN BETHLEHEM SPORTS
Hawks-‘Canes highlight opening weekend
It’s opening weekend to the high school football season and there is no better matchup in the area than this Friday’s showdown at Frank Banko Field between Liberty and Bethlehem Catholic.
With the Golden Hawks penciled in as favorites in the East Penn Conference’s North Division, the Hawks enter this week’s tilt in that same capacity.
By Peter Car

OTHER STORIES
Bethlehem: Council looks to debt savings
Bethelehem: Food co-op hosts picnic
Bethlehem: Schools get energy conservation honors
Business: Broadway car wash opens
Business: Cigar International hosts open house
Northampton County: Council imposes residency rule on top officials
Northampton County: Morganelli to drug dealers-‘We’ll take your house, car and money’
Lehigh Valley: Dent meets with immigrant kids
Saucon Valley: Board, teachers at odds on contract

WEEKLY FEATURES
Around town community calendar
Police logs
People Say
Area obituaries
Center for Animal Health and Welfare
Volunteers

The Bethlehem Press online
Where to buy the Bethlehem Press
To subscribe: New start
Send news to the Bethlehem Press
To advertise: Ad staff
Follow us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter

Thursday, August 21, 2014


August 20, 2014
The Bethlehem Press online


COVER STORY
Moving back home
Student debt has long-term impact on graduates. As of early 2014, the amount of student loan debt in the United States reached $1.1 trillion. Students earning a bachelor’s degree graduate with an average debt of $29,400, according to a June report released by the Domestic Policy Council and the Council of Economic Advisers.
By Katya Hrichak, Bethlehem Press intern


LEHIGH VALLEY
Sandy Hook ES parent promote ‘Healthy Minds’
The mother of 6-year-old Dylan Hockley who was killed in the tragic mass shooting at Sandy Hook ES, Newtown, Conn., visited Allentown Aug. 1 to discuss the Promoting Healthy Minds for Safer Communities Act.
Photo: At a press conference in Allentown, Nicole Hochley shows a picture of her son Dylan who was killed in the tragic mass shooting at Sandy Hook ES, Newtown, Conn.
By Deb Galbraith


COMMUNITY
Park target of restoration work
Preservation consultant John Harry explains the relatively new process of micro-grouting, a restoration method already being used on the earthquake-damaged Washington Monument. Behind Harry are four of the five student interns, Brittany Flynn, Jessica Morris, Rebecca Murray and Michelle Barakat, and consulting contractor E. J. Nickles.
By Dana Grubb


LEHIGH VALLEY
Preparing for emergencies
In a day of cell phones and satellites, people no longer pay much attention to ham radios. But when Hurricane Sandy stuck in 2012 and most Lehigh Valley municipalities were without power or cell phone service, it was the lowly ham radio that kept people in touch. Northampton County Emergency Management relied on ham operators to keep in touch with outlying townships. So did the American Red Cross, which had ham operators at each emergency shelter. Photo: Contacts were monitored at three different stations.
By Bernie O’Hare


SOUTHSIDE
Walk the walk, talk the talk
Everyone in the Lehigh Valley was touched in some way by “The Steel,” as most Lehigh Valley residents referred to the company. Either a family member worked there or a neighbor or a friend or someone you knew was employed at the approximately four-mile long company located adjacent to the Lehigh River in Bethlehem. Photo: The steel stacks reflected in the windows of the 1913 Electrical Repair Shop, which will become the National Museum of Industrial History.
By Bud Cole


SOUTHSIDE
Annual sale exceeds $16,000 goal
Bethlehem residents Fransisco Rosa, bottom left, and Herbert Felix examine an incredible variety of primarily used merchandise for sale as fellow bargain hunters swarm the huge 200-by-40 foot tent.
By Tim Gilman


DA VINCI CENTER
The past and future of space
If you are like most people, and were around on July 20, 1969, you probably remember where you were and what you were doing. Neil Armstrong definitely remembered what he was doing that day because he was about to become the first human to step foot on earth’s moon: “One small step for man; one giant leap for mankind.” Photo: Forrest Cavalier, Augustin Cavalier and Ambrose Cavalier, all from Saylorsburg, try out the space bike exhibit at the DA Vinci Center.
By Carole Gorney


COMMUNITY
Making children feel special
Children who might otherwise not have pencils or paper will start the school year fully stocked with school supplies and brand-new backpacks, thanks to the St. Luke’s “Backpacks to Brighten” project. Photo: Diana Witczak, RN, supervisor of the Nurse Family Partnership, Visiting Nurse Association (VNA) of St. Luke’s; Betsy Genthner, LPN, PATH program, VNA of St. Luke’s; Sara Klingner, MSN, CNM, RN, director of Maternal Child Health Initiatives, St. Luke’s University Health Network; and Helen Willis, RN, VNAC program, VNA of St. Luke’s.
Contributed story/photos


THIS WEEK IN BETHLEHEM SPORTS
Raiders turn 50
Sue Hrkach realizes she won’t be cooking too many dinners throughout the remainder of August and through November. Instead, she likely will be serving in her role as treasurer and supporter for the Bethlehem Raiders Football Organization, a role she has cherished for the past 16 years. Photo: 2013 Executive Board Members: top row (left to right) - President Tom Picone, Vice President Joe Pastor; middle row - fundraising coordinator Melissa Crenko, football coordinators John Renninger and Lou Jimenez, treasurer Sue Hrkach; bottom row - snack stand coordinator Nanette Jimenez, secretary Kelly McKellvey and cheerleading coordinator Jessica Pastor.
By Jeff Moeller
Bethlehem sports on the Facebook.

OTHER STORIES
Lehigh Valley: Comedian’s death brings mental illness to forefront
Musikfest: Attendance again tops 1 million
Bethlehem Township: Bulldogs blitz commissioners
Bethlehem Township: Customer service improvements proposed
Bethlehem Twnship: V-7 lot plan gets poor reception
BASD: District prepares for school start
Southside: Boys & Girls Club toorney draws 114 golfers
Business: N-Tensity opens in Hellertown

WEEKLY FEATURES
Around town community calendar
Police logs
Area obituaries
Center for Animal Health and Welfare
Volunteers
Student profiles
High school news reports

The Bethlehem Press online
Where to buy the Bethlehem Press
To subscribe: New start
Send news to the Bethlehem Press
To advertise: Ad staff
Follow us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter

Friday, August 15, 2014


Aug. 13, 2014
Bethlehem Press on YouTube


PAYING THE PRICE-PART 2
College costs outpace incomes, state funding, aid
Student loan debt has nearly tripled in the last decade. The Federal Reserve Bank of New York reports that from 2004 to 2012, student debt increased from $364 billion to $966 billion, according to researcher Alan Pyke in an April 23, 2014, Think Progress article. A June report released by the Domestic Policy Council and the Council of Economic Advisers says 71 percent of students earning a bachelor’s degree graduate with debt, averaging $29,400 per student.
By Katya Hrichak


ILLICK'S MILL
Dolan responds to criticisms
For six months, suspicion and reports of mismanagement have plagued Bethlehem City Council member Karen Dolan and potentially doomed the nonprofit organization that runs the Illick’s Mill Fox Environmental Center. She has spent more than a decade developing the center and had served as its executive director until this past April. Critics have raised concerns about ethical, rental, utility, tax filing and construction payment issues. A grand jury inquiry led by Northampton County District Attorney John Morganelli into suspected improper operation of the nonprofit has stifled funding support of the center which has been a contributing factor to its recent closing. In an exclusive interview, Dolan said she is the victim of lies, misleading information and politics.
By Nate Jastrzemski



MUSIKFEST
Successful run come to an end
he night sky over Bethlehem lights up as Musikfest 2014 ends its festivities with a closing  fireworks display.
By Dana Grubb and Tim Gilman


Saurus attracts crowds
Saurus dinosaur-like giant birds – 18-foot-tall puppet costumes with operators on stilts – proceed down Main Street during one of several daily performances the final weekend of Musikfest. In its 31st year, the festival featured Saurus as a bold new addition to its free entertainment. Three of the artistic Saurus puppets and trained personnel were provided by the Dutch street theater troupe Close Act, which has had limited appearances in the United States.
By Tim Gilman


BETHLEHEM
Mannafest promotes ministry
El Shaddai Bethlehem Ministries East Broad Street campus was the scene of a weeklong alcohol-free event, Mannafest, which ran from Aug. 1 through 10. At the family-oriented event, attendees enjoyed live entertainment, a kid zone, visual arts, an array of foods and vendors. Each day of Mannafest had a different theme and entertainment was centered on Christian ministry. Photo: On Mannafest’s Old School Night, The Harmenaires gave their wonderful harmony to Christian music.
By Dana Grubb


COMMUNITY
Hundreds join drum circle
Kathy Duzant, Bernae Horwath and their children participate in the drum circle at SteelStacks. They received free Remo Sound Shape mini drums handed out at the door to the Musikfest Cafe.
By Katya Hrichak


ST. LUKE’S
Anderson Campus garden dedicated
St. Luke’s Medical Director of Oncology Services Dr. Lee Riley, St. Luke’s Anderson Campus President Ed Nawrocki, St. Luke’s past Auxiliary President Virginia Oskin and newly elected Auxiliary President Kris Warner participate in a ceremonial ribbon cutting to celebrate the dedication of St. Luke’s Auxiliary Garden.
Contributed story


SCHOOL
Greek history comes alive
After studying about the ancient Greek city-states in history class, Nitschmann MS sixth graders had an opportunity to unwind from the academic studies side of school to compete in a modern day version of the Olympics in early June. Photo: The Athens city-state Olympic team recites the Olympic athlete’s pledge prior to the start of competition.
By Dana Grubb

COMMUNITY
BAPL garden restored
Though there’s a garden right behind the Bethlehem Area Public Library, it has been neglected in recent years. It was once maintained by Musikfest volunteers, but that stopped when the festival stopped using Payrow Plaza as one of its venues. Fortunately, Girl Scout Troop 810, under the guidance of Troop Leader Pat Scipioni, has breathed new life into the old garden. Photo: Twins Nareh and Nazeh Tahmassian are focused on packing the dirt down around their flowers.
By Bernie O’Hare


THIS WEEK IN BETHLEHEM SPORTS
District 11, St. Luke’s team up
St. Luke’s and District 11 formally teamed up for a partnership Tuesday morning during a press conference held at St. Luke’s Campus in Cetronia.
Photo: On hand last week to represent the athletes of District 11 were, left to right: Eli Nabholz, Pottsville, baseball and basketball; Mikayla Stoudt, Parkland, cross country and track and field; Cameron Richardson, Northwestern, football and track and field; Meredith Sholder, Emmaus, field hockey; Avery Semler, Parkland, field hockey; Phillip Houseknect, Emmaus, soccer; and Cory Croll, Northampton, football.
By Pete Car
Bethlehem sports on the Facebook.

OTHER STORIES
Bethlehem: Dolan responds to criticisms
Bethlehem: Council approves authority bond issue
BASD: Roy offers communication, PR plan
BASD: Changes coming to softball program
Northampton County: Discord continues with executive
Northampton County: Senior center moves to Forks township

WEEKLY FEATURES
Around town community calendar
Police logs
Area obituaries
Center for Animal Health and Welfare
Volunteers
Student profiles
High school news reports

The Bethlehem Press online
Where to buy the Bethlehem Press
To subscribe: New start
Send news to the Bethlehem Press
To advertise: Ad staff
Follow us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter

Tuesday, August 5, 2014


August 6, 2014
Bethlehem Press on YouTube

COVER STORY
Student loans: Paying the Price-Part 1
A post-secondary education is the single most important investment that Americans can make in their futures but financing college through loans leaves graduates deeply in debt.
By Katya Hrichak


NORTHAMPTON COUNTY
Brown: Operate county cost-effectively
Northampton Executive John Brown, speaking at a PBS 39 studio in South Bethlehem, told a group of five Northampton County residents, reporters and part of his Northampton County staff that the 2,200 county employees “do a phenomenal job.
By Douglas Graves







31ST MUSIKFEST
‘A melting pot of sound’
“Who would have thought that from the embers of Bethlehem Steel an entire new industry would flourish, a creative industry that honors the community’s past and celebrates its future with music, dance, theater, film and visual arts,” Pennsylvania First Lady Susan Corbett said during the opening ceremony of the 31st annual Musikfest. Photo: Mucca Pazza, a unique combo of marching and  rock ’n roll band styles, parades through the Northside Musikfest grounds along Spring Street Saturday afternoon as a loud and colorful prelude to a scheduled evening performance in the Volksplatz tent. The “circus punk marching band” from Chicago is playing at Bethlehem’s signature music festival for the first time.
By Katya Hrichak
Photos by Dana Grubb, Bernie O’Hare and Tim Gilman



BETHLEHEM
Charter Arts gets glass canopy
The Lehigh Valley Charter HS for the Arts’ Executive Director Diane LaBelle received a certificate of appropriateness from the Historic Conservation District board July 21 approving LaBelle’s choice of glass panels for a canopy at the new building currently under construction.
By Dougas Graves


COMMUNITY
Dinner marks St. Stephen’s 20th anniversary
An open house and benefit dinner were held earlier this summer for Stephen’s Place, the halfway house that assists men coming out of prison with substance abuse recovery and the development of life skills in a spiritual environment.  Sister Virginia Longcope is the founder of Stephen’s Place and has been running it for 20 years. This year was the first benefit dinner, which was sponsored by the Reverend Dr. Janice Young. Photo: Attendees at Stephen’s Place open house visit the garden.  More than 100 attended the dinner at the Se-Wy-Co Banquet Hall.
By Amber Mirza

BETHLEHEM CATHOLIC ATHLETES OF THE YEAR
Freddie Simmons and Julia Madison
By Pete Car and Katie McDonald
Bethlehem sports on the Facebook.


OTHER STORIES
BASD: Judge says drowning case can proceed
NORCO: DA warns-‘Tell the truth’
Bethlehem Zoning: New facility will aid kids, edflerly
Bethlehem Township: Chrin’s plan for V-7 lot gets poor reception


WEEKLY FEATURES
Around town community calendar
Police logs
Area obituaries
Center for Animal Health and Welfare
Volunteers
Student profiles
High school news reports

The Bethlehem Press online
Where to buy the Bethlehem Press
To subscribe: New start
Send news to the Bethlehem Press
To advertise: Ad staff
Follow us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter

Tuesday, July 29, 2014


July 30, 2014
Bethlehem Press on YouTube


COVER STORY
Same-sex marriage: Continuing point of discussion
In May, after a U.S. federal judge ruled as unconstitutional the state’s ban on same-sex marriages, the state became one of the last Northeast region states to legalize same-sex marriages. In 2014, there are 20 states where same-sex marriages are legal. As a result of the recent ruling, some local churches are opening their doors to wed same-sex couples. Other churches, however, are not. Their leaders say the state’s law goes against Christian teaching and they will uphold the separation of church and state tha t exempts them from the law.
By Carol Smith

MILESTONES
Douglas Caldwell: A man of God and the people
Hundreds of people filled the Central Moravian Church in historic downtown Bethlehem Sunday to remember and honor the Rev. Douglas Caldwell, the beloved pastor of the church from 1983-2009. Caldwell died on July 17 at age 71. PHOTO: Members of the Bethlehem Area Moravian Trombone Choir played outside Central Moravian Church and during the memorial service Sunday for the late Rev. Douglas Caldwell.
By Carole Gorney





BETHLEHEM TOWNSHIP

'We owe it to our kids'
In a detailed presentation, David Biddison of Tradiions of America, told township planners and the public that a proposed active senior gated community will consist of 265 single-family detached dwellings linked by a two-mile walking path and include amenities like a clubhouse and pool. Photo: Green Pond is identified in maps prepared in 1735 by William Penn’s daughter. It is a refuge for a wide variety of birds and other wildlife.
By Bernie O’Hare


BETHLEHEM
Book sale a hit with readers
At the July book sale Cory Swenor, Alejandro Gala and Aiden Swenor searched for children’s books entitled “Chicka Chicka Boom Boom.” The Swenor’s mother, Carmela, is a pre-school teacher and she brought the boys along to their first book sale with an assignment to assist her with looking for specific children’s titles.
By Dana Grubb


MUSIKFEST
My journey with the Moody Blues
As Musikfest approaches I am anticipating the performance by my favorite rock band, the Moody Blues Aug. 5 on the Sands Steel Stage. This will be these classic British rockers’ third appearance in Bethlehem, including a 1986 performance at Stabler Arena and one in 2007 at Musikfest. They’ve appeared elsewhere in the Lehigh Valley over the years, both at the Allentown Fairgrounds and State Theatre in Easton, but their performances in Bethlehem are an especially nice treat for this lifetime fan. Photo: Justin Hayward and John Lodge perform at the State Theatre in Easton during an April 2008 concert that I photographed for Threshold Records.
By Dana Grubb


HISTORIC BETHLEHEM
Blueberry Festival: Music, crafts and pie
What would the Blueberry Festival be without blueberry pie and blueberry swirled ice cream? Barbara Bertram of Center Valley, her niece Emily Perose of Allentown, and Jay Spinelli from Swathmore, were served their desserts by volunteer Sydney Hoover. Tombler’s Bakery provided 680 blueberry, 50 peach and 50 strawberry-rhubarb pies for the two-day event.
By Carole Gorney and Tim Gilman


CLASSROOM
Calypso ES: Learning about careers
Students at Calypso ES had an opportunity in early May to learn about a variety careers at their fifth annual career day. Pre-K to second grade students spent a morning assembly learning about careers in teaching math, food preparation, owning a small business and photography. Third through fifth graders spent an afternoon with a non-profit director, surgical technician, graphic designer and bomb squad robot operator. Photo: Kindergartner Elias Negron is the air of concentration as he colors his fractal geometric design for posting on a display that included all the students’ designs.
By Dana Grubb

THIS WEEK IN BETHLEHEM HISTORY
Lynching in Bethlehem Township
Joseph Snyder recognized most of the men in the crowd of hundreds who surrounded him on the morning of Dec. 27, 1880. Some were his co-workers at the Coleman ore mine; others were drinking buddies he socialized with at Hanoverville Hotel. The rest were local farmers, also a shoemaker, prominent physician and a judge. Before that day, these friends and acquaintances knew Snyder as a 26-year- old man who was likable but had a sporadic work history and a penchant for alcohol. As they called for his death, they only saw him as a monster, undeserving of the right to a trial. Fresh in the their memory were two recent murder trials that ended with mild punishments and had cost the Northampton County taxpayers huge sums of money (Laros and Bortree trials).
By Karen M. Samuels

THIS WEEK IN BETHLEHEM SPORTS
Athletes of the Year: Liberty HS
Gunning’s story is a lesson for everyone
Cecchini the definition of multisport athlete
By Pete Car and Katie McDonald
Bethlehem sports on the Facebook.

OTHER STORIES
State: Budget passed; disliked by many
Bethlehem: Brong cleared by report
Fountain Hill: Council ponders teleconferencing use
BASD: School to Work program can earn students some money
Hanover Township: Longtime engineer retires

WEEKLY FEATURES
Around town community calendar
Police logs
Area obituaries
Center for Animal Health and Welfare
Volunteers
Student profiles
High school news reports

The Bethlehem Press online
Where to buy the Bethlehem Press
To subscribe: New start
Send news to the Bethlehem Press
To advertise: Ad staff
Follow us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter