OUR 10TH YEAR OF SERVICE
TO THE CITY OF BETHLEHEM, BETHLEHEM AND HANOVER TOWNSHIPS AND THE BOROUGHS OF FOUNTAIN HILL, FREEMANSBURG AND HELLERTOWN

Phone: 610-625-2121 FAX: 610-625-2126 gtaylor@tnonline.com

Tuesday, August 25, 2015


August 26, 2015



COVER STORY
  Rise and shine
Researchers question early school starting time
The issue of school start times and sleep-deprived youth is not new. Back in the early 1990s, researchers at Brown University found that the onset of puberty creates a shift in sleeping patterns. Teens tend to go to bed later and get up later than younger children to get the eight to 11 hours of sleep they need.
By Katya Hrichak, Nate Jastrzemski and Ross Sonnenblick


MUSIKFEST
  Attendance once again tops 1M
From Arizona to Africa and Texas to Turkey, guests from across the nation and around the globe made their way to Bethlehem and the Lehigh Valley for the 32nd annual Musikfest, enjoying 10 days packed with free music, art and family fun. Photo: Giant-sized ants and children at Handwerplatz work together to arrange large breadcrumb-like shapes in various patterns. The Polyglot Theatre troupe of three costumed actors from Melbourne, Australia, put on an interactive performance which encourages the festival’s children to participate in the activity in the downtown historic area of Bethlehem.  
Photo by Tim Gilman

 
MUSIKFEST
  The hottest commodity
In Casa De Jorge’s pineapple habaƱero salsa, one can expect to find pineapple and habaƱero peppers. In its roasted garlic and olives salsa (Casa De Jorge’s top seller), the ingredients are equally straightforward.  These examples then beg an entertaining question – what exactly is in the ominously christened “Stupid Hot” salsa? Photo: Patrick Barron laughs before answering yet another question about the Stupid Hot salsa.
By Ross Sonnenblick

 
COMMUNITY
  Kids meet community heroes
Local community heroes recently visited to the Southside Branch of the Bethlehem Area Public Library, connecting children participating in the summer reading theme of “every hero has a story” to real life. Four firefighters from the Schweder Fire Station’s Company 1, the city’s mounted police patrol and the canine police patrol each visited over a three-week period to explain the roles that they play in public safety to the youngsters participating in the reading program. Photo: After listening to Officer Mike Leaser’s presentation, the children have an opportunity to pose questions to the officers.
By Dana Grubb


BUSINESS
  Libby's Thrift opens on Southside
A new business has opened at 414 E. Fourth St., fulfilling a dream for Bethlehem resident Linda Terrick. Libby’s Thrift, named for Terrick’s granddaughter, will specialize in “quality second hand clothing” at affordable prices according to Terrick. Photo: Friends and supporters turn out in a show of support for Libby’s Thrift owner Linda Terrick during her Aug. 3 grand opening.
By Dana Grubb
 
 
PEOPLE
  Celebrating new families
Courthouses are rarely happy places, but the recent sight of four young children, dressed in their Sunday best and running and laughing outside, brought smiles to Northampton County deputy sheriffs and courthouse visitors alike. They were at the county courthouse for a good reason. They had just been adopted.
By Bernie O’Hare
 
FAMILY
  Henrys celebrate 60 years of marriage
When William Henry met Leah at Franklin Junior HS in Bethlehem, he knew he didn’t want to let her get away.  He was persistent, but he faced a challenge. “She didn’t want anything to do with me,” Henry recalls. “When I came to mow the lawn for her father, I came in the front door and she went out the back. Photo: William and Leah married in Bethlehem July 30, 1955. Their five daughters arranged the anniversary celebration attended by 70 people.
By Carole Gorney
 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS
  USL franchise comes to LV
Professional soccer will return to the Lehigh Valley in March of 2016 and the Philadelphia Union of Major League Soccer are hoping to go all-in on the prospects of success the region can offer. The Union made the announcement last Wednesday during a press conference at Lehigh’s Goodman Stadium, officially announcing the Lehigh Valley as the 27th franchise of the United Soccer League.
By Peter Car

OTHER STORIES
Bethlehem: School district braced for state budget woes
Bethlehem: State budget crisis forces delays in charter school funds
Bethlehem: Council approves 911 system study
Bethlehem: Second-quarter finances ‘beating plan,’ says Brong
Bethleham: Self-portrait show ends soon
Bethlehem Township: Board wants running bamboo to run away
Bethlehem Township: Zawarski’s apology offends Hudak
Northampton County: Brown commends West Easton Borough
Fountain Hill: Council chooses new tech provider
Lehigh Valley: Wanted for murder – Quadir Taylor

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Center for Animal Health and Welfare
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Student profiles
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Monday, August 17, 2015


August 19, 2015

COVER STORY
  ‘We challenged the system’
Local Community Action Committee marks half a century in its fight to end poverty
This year-2015-we are commemorating several momentous historical anniversaries.  One-hundred-fifty years ago the Civil War ended and President Lincoln was assassinated. One hundred years later, the country embarked on yet another war - the “War on Poverty.”   In his State of the Union address to Congress in January 1964, President Lyndon Johnson called for legislation that expanded on the policy ideas initiated by President John F. Kennedy before his assassination only months before. PHOTO: CACLV Executive Director Alan Jennings has been the voice for fairness and justice for the valley’s poor. 
By Carole Gorney


COMMUNITY:
  YWCA to honor four area residents
Lehigh County Executive Tom Muller will attend the YWCA’s 88th Annual Meeting Aug. 20 at the Hotel Bethlehem and present proclamations announcing August 20, 2015 as YWCA Day in Bethlehem, Allentown, Northampton and Lehigh counties.
Photo: Larry Holmes will be the keynote speaker at the YWCA’s 88th Annual Meeting.
Contributed story

LEHIGH VALLEY
  Arts Council honors community supporters of access to the arts
Three community cultural leaders were honored recently by the Lehigh Valley Arts Council for their efforts to provide access to the performing and visual arts for persons with hearing, visual and physical disabilities. During the annual Arts Council membership reception at the Good Shepherd Health and Technology Center, Executive Director Randall Forte praised the work that is being done, and then presented certificates of congratulation to the honorees from the Pa. Senate. Photo: SATORI Executive Director Nora Suggs was one of three cultural community leaders receiving a special congratulatory document from the state senate for her work to provide improved access to musical performances for the deaf.
By Carole Gorney

NORTHAMPTON COUNTY
  43 towns vie for grants
Northampton County’s Community Investment Partnership Program (CIPP) was just announced in January, but is going full speed ahead. Executive John Brown plans to use table games revenue from the Sands Casino for a variety of grants and revolving loans, with an emphasis on its aging boroughs and townships. Photo: Diane Donaher and John Brown announced CIPP Program in January.
By Bernie O’Hare


SOUTH BETHLEHEM
  New facility hosts ‘Gala of Dreams’
The 2015 Gala of Dreams to benefit the Lehigh Valley Charter High School for the Arts (Charter Arts) in early June at the school’s new facility located at the corner of Third & Polk Streets in south Bethlehem was an exciting milestone for the school as it prepares to move into the new facility in August. Photo: The Charter Arts Touring Choir, Wind Ensemble and Writing Club deliver a beautiful and moving performance to open the event.
Contributed story

THIS WEEK IN BETHLEHEM HISTORY
  Packer Campus at the Lehigh University
In 1863, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia assigned Rev. Mchael C. McEnroe to Holy Infancy Roman Catholic Church, a 2,650-member congregation primarily of Irish workers and other ethnic Catholics who lived in South Bethlehem.
Two years later in 1865, the Episcopal Nativity Cathedral was built with the support of William H. Sayre, his son, Robert and other residents in Fountain Hill. Many members of this congregation held supervisory positions at the Bethlehem Iron Company and the Lehigh Valley Railroad. Photo: A engraving of Packer Hall, located “On the general declivity of the Lehigh [South] Mountain range in South Bethlehem  . . . in the midst of forest trees, . . . three hundred and sixty feet above the river,” decorated the first brochure advertising Lehigh University, printed in the spring of 1866.
By Ken Raniere


LEHIGH VALLEY
  Focus on the fun factor
The Color Fun Fest, held July 11 at Coca Cola Park in Allentown, showered all of its participants in color, whether they were involved in the 5K or came just for the festival. The Color Run 5K and Holi Festival and electric dance movement were combined to maximize the color and fun. The festival, located in the parking lot in front of the stadium, featured a stage with dancers, food stands and merchandise tables. The start and finish lines for the 5K were situated on either side of the stage.
Photo: As daylight fades, the black lights are turned on and glow sticks are worn. Special night color packets were given out and used to enhance the color underneath the lights and the enjoyment of the event.
By Katya Hrichak

CLASSROOM
  Expanding horizons … baking
A cake baking and decorating class for students entering grades six through nine was held as part of Northampton Community College’s Horizons for Youth summer programs. The course was held at the Fowler Family Center on the Southside from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 20 through 23. Photo: Phebe Ann W. watches Alyson D. mix their fondant to the proper shade of blue before removing their cake from the fridge to ice it.
By Katya Hrichak



BETHLEHEM SPORTS
Professional soccer to return to the Lehigh Valley
Professional soccer will be back in Bethlehem and the Philadelphia Union will make things official on Wednesday afternoon at Lehigh University’s Goodman Stadium.
A press conference is set to announce that the Union will continue their player development structure by launching their own team in the lower division United Soccer League.
By Peter Car

LEHIGH VALLEY FOCUS
Celebrating 150 years of art at Lehigh
Lehigh University is celebrating its Sesquicentennial Anniversary as a teaching institution through the arts. As part of its 150-year celebration, Lehigh University Art Galleries (LUAG) is opening three art exhibits this fall: “Object As Subject: The LUAG Teaching Collection,” “Of The Americas: Contemporary Latin American Art” and “Revisiting South Bethlehem: 150 Years of Photography.” The three exhibitions were curated from The Lehigh University Art Galleries Teaching Collection.
By Nelson Quinones

OTHER STORIES
Bethlehem: Group supports garden diversity
Northampton County: Commandments plaque missing … again
Bethlehem: Gofling supports the Boys & Girls Club
Bethlehem: Edgeboro Moravian’s outdoor worship

WEEKLY FEATURES
Around town community calendar
Police logs
Area obituaries
Center for Animal Health and Welfare
Volunteers
Student profiles
High school news reports

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Tuesday, August 11, 2015

August 12, 2015

COVER STORY
  Musikfest: A catalyst that brings us together
ArtsQuest CEO and president Kassie Hilgert welcomes festgoers to the opening ceremony of the 32nd annual Musikfest at Americaplatz (Levitt Pavilion) at SteelStacks in South Bethlehem.
By Katy Hrichak and Tim Gilman

  
Musikfest Preview Night
Local band Post Junction plays at the Musikfest Preview Night on the Community Stage at Air Products Town Square outside SteelStacks. Performing Post Junction funk musicians are Vernon Mobley (drums) of Coopersburg, Peter Fritz (bass guitar) of Bethlehem, Terri (vocals) and John Fadem (guitar) of Hellertown.
By Tim Gilman


  Musikfest Preview Concert
Duran Duran members Dom Brown, John Taylor and Simon Le Bon play their 1984 hit, “The Wild Boys” on the Musikfest Sands Steel Stage during preview night Aug. 6. When Duran Duran asked to play a day earlier than Musikfest was scheduled to open, ArtsQuest officials happily accommodated the British pop band, making it the first main stage preview night in Musikfest’s 32-year history. The 4,000-plus attendees were lucky with the beautiful summer weather and a great show by Duran Duran.
By Karen Samuels

PASSINGS
  John B. Cornish, research engineer
John B. Cornish, 86, of Bethlehem, died August 1, 2015. Born in Uniontown, he was a son of the late Harry Emmett and Mildred (Terry) Cornish. He was the husband of the late Nancy (Ritter) Cornish.


SAUCON VALLEY
  Celebrating Restaurant Week
Server Lacy Stem delivers lunch to retired Saucon Valley HS teachers Pat Monahan from Allentown and Athena Newman from Bethlehem, who agree about DiMaio’s Family Ristorante and Pizzeria: “It’s our place to go, we’ve been coming here for years.” Manager Anna DiMaio said, “Just the thought of restaurant week brings in customers.”
By Dana Grubb


CLASSROOM
  Scholarships the old-fashioned way
Bethlehem Area School District held its second annual academic signing event as the top 23 graduating seniors signed their letters of intent in front of family, friends and district officials June 1 in the BASD Education Center. Photo: The Bethlehem Area School District’s 23 top academic high school seniors put pens to letters of intent as their families and friends record the moment.
By Dana Grubb and Alex Green

BETHLEHEM SPORTS
  Some clarity reached on PIAA classifications
The saga of expanding the PIAA football classifications from four to six classes will continue into the fall.  The PIAA’s two committees responsible for the matter — the strategic planning committee and the football steering committee — met in late July to discuss the eight proposals on the table for football classification expansion.
By Peter Car

LEHIGH VALLEY FOCUS
  Musikfest’s 32nd edition continues
The 32nd annual Musikfest continues through Aug. 16 in Downtown Bethlehem’s Historic District and Southside Bethlehem’s SteelStacks. Musikfest showcases a world of music and food. This year, the official Musikfest Mug showcases a world of great savings with special offers by 11 area restaurants and attractions.
By Paul Willistein

OTHER STORIES
Bethlehem: Zoned hauling trial gets trashed
Bethlehem: Provident grant benefits after-school program
Bethlehem: Board hires 23 teachers for 2015-16
Classroom: Supply chain management puts students on fast track to success
Fountain Hill: Open sewer concerns residents
Freemansburg: Council ponders new fire marshal
Northampton County: Council hears EastPenn pipeline details
Northampton County: Court order sought over raises

WEEKLY FEATURES
Around town community calendar
Police logs
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Center for Animal Health and Welfare
Volunteers
Student profiles
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Tuesday, August 4, 2015

August 5, 2015
COVER STORY
  Season’s change: Bethlehem loses
  longtime kings of summer and winter
Musikfest and Christmas are two of the most exciting and wholly Bethlehem events each year for many people. And each year those events, their roots delving deeply into the public consciousness, were intertwined with the two men who personified them. Last week, the city lost “Jolly” Joe Timmer, king of the Polka and spirit of Musikfest, and Charles “Bud” Berge, who embodied St. Nicholas for more than two decades at the Yuletide Christkindlmarkt. Top: “Jolly” Joe Timmer, king of the polka and spirit of Musikfest. Bottom: Charles “Bud” Berge brought Christmas joy to many children.
By Nate Jastrzemski


  That was ‘Jolly’ Joe
I am writing about “Jolly” Joe Timmer not only because he was the King of Polka, or the owner and general manager of WGPA, or the producer and host of The “Jolly” Joe Timmer Show on television, but because that larger-than-life personality we saw and heard was, in reality, a person who looked out for the little guy, the underdog.
Yes, I was one of them, but there were many. Photo: Some of the WGPA staff broadcasting live from Festplatz at Musikfest 2006: (front) Mark Thomas, Jarret Brown (back) Bob Kauffman, Jolly Joe Timmer, Katie McDonald.
By Katie McDonald


BETHLEHEM
  Getting ready for Musikfest
A scaffolding tower for Musikfest’s Sands Steel Stage at PNC Plaza is assembled by the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees before the Preview Night of Musikfest 2015. The IATSE local 200, based in Bethlehem, is responsible for erecting Musikfest’s South Bethlehem major concert ticketed stage and the two towers which contain the sound system and hold up the venue’s roof. An assembly crew of some 30 IATSE stagehands was on hand Friday. This year’s Preview Night, Aug. 6, features Duran Duran which returns to Musikfest for the first time in 15 years.
By Tim Gilman


ANOTHER VIEW
  Ed’s World
By Ed Courrier


SCHOOL
  Carnival benefits school activities
Students, parents, school staff and neighbors of Nitschmann MS enjoyed an inaugural school and community carnival this past spring, one filled with traditional fun activities like a dunking booth, cake walk, bean bag toss, football throw, 50/50 raffle, music, food, refreshments and vendors. School resource officer Sean Conley said monies raised by the event would be used to support students participating in the Junior Police Academy Program and other school activities such as field trips. Conley, who said the original goal was to raise $2,000, later reported proceeds nearly double that amount.
By Dana Grubb

BETHLEHEM SPORTS
  Liberty HS Athletes of the Year
    • Kaylin West: The engine for Liberty
    • Lou Csaszar: A force to be reckoned with
By Pete Car and Kathy McDonald

LEHIGH VALLEY FOCUS
  Musikfest preview
Musikfest, which takes place in Downtown Bethlehem’s Historic District and Southside Bethlehem’s SteelStacks, has 325-plus artists  performing for its 32nd year, Aug. 7 - 16, Bethlehem. The festival has free music on 15 of its 16 stages, with 550 free music and art performances, the most in the event’s history.

OTHER STORIES
Lehigh Valley: Casey hopes to fill WIC gap
State: Kise to head state group
Bethlehem: Beating the heat
Bethlehem: Camp Cadet

WEEKLY FEATURES
Around town community calendar
Police logs
Area obituaries
Center for Animal Health and Welfare
Volunteers
Student profiles
High school news reports

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Tuesday, July 28, 2015


July 29, 2015

COVER STORY
  Let’s go for a bike hike
It didn’t sound that monumental at first. All you had to do was get on a bicycle and ride 335 miles over abandoned rail lines and canal towpaths from Pittsburgh to Washington in nine days. But our confidence became tainted slightly as the game plan details unfolded. Starting at Pittsburgh’s Point, a magnificent water fountain, was easy enough. Lots of people were walking around. One of them volunteered to take a photo which quickly went up on Facebook. Photo: Once bustling with mules hauling canal boats, the towpaths now mirror the colors and sounds of nature. Allan J. Wilkins (left) is a former journalist and semi-retired IT systems analyst, residing in Bethlehem. Len Barcousky is a former Lehigh Valley journalist, now with The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. They have been friends for almost 35 years.
By Allan Wilkin


HISTORIC BETHLEHEM
  A berry good time
The 29th annual Blueberry Festival July 18 and 19 at the historic Burnside Plantation in Bethlehem offered visitors of all ages  music, family activities, crafts, demonstrations and assorted food. Photo: The John Sebastion Goundie booth features local beer historian Chris Bowen and his assistant Adam Kolman. The 19th century brewers in period clothing re-enact the beer making process for John Halko and his two sons, Michael and John, who live within walking distance of the festival.
By Tim Gilman


COMMUNITY
  'Service brings out the best in us‘
Rebecca Neafcy views life from a different perspective after working side-by-side with Nicaraguan families during an April Thrivent Builds Worldwide trip. Rebecca Neafcy fully expected to work hard building homes and changing the lives of Nicaraguan families. While these expectations were met, it came as a surprise that she was also personally and strongly impacted by the experience. Photo: Rebecca Neafcy helped build a community of homes for families in Nicaragua. Neafcy traveled to Central America in mid-April as part of a Thrivent Builds with Habitat for Humanity trip.
Contributed story

BETHLEHEM HISTORY
  R.F. Sell: Innovative sportsman
If the crowds pouring into Liberty HS Stadium an hour and a half before game-time gave any indication of the level of success big-time sporting events would receive in the Lehigh Valley, the results were going to be huge. Professional football made its debut in Bethlehem on Sept. 19, 1945 before a capacity house of 20,000 gridiron enthusiasts.
By Jason Rehm


CLASSROOM
  Learning world cultures through sports
James Buchanan ES students had a chance to celebrate diversity near the end of the school year by participating in a Sports Fest that featured games indigenous to other cultures. Field hockey (Scotland), lacrosse (Native American), hurling (Ireland) and cricket (India) were featured as students learned from participants who play each. Guidance counselor Maryann Kearns said she hoped the elementary students would “learn about other cultures and develop respect for each by participating in the not so well known and unique athletics.” Third and fourth graders participated as fifth grade videographers recorded the event for a later presentation. Photo: Coach Dave explains to James Buchanan students that hurling is 3,000 years old and that it is Ireland’s national sport.
By Dana Grubb


PBS39
  Academy inspires future journalists
If she had to choose one word to describe PBS39’s Media Academy, camp director Carly Dontas would choose “intensive.” Funded by a grant from the Lehigh Valley Business/Education Partnership, the camp was held at the PBS39 public media and education center at 839 Sesame Place on the SteelStacks campus. Although it only ran from June 15 through 19, the hours between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. were packed with different activities focused on the business of broadcast journalism. Photo: On the final day of the camp, students, parents and employees watch the finished video resumes in the studio. Camp participants were awarded certificates to conclude the final day of the Media Academy.
By Katya Hrichak

BETHLEHEM SPORTS
  Bethlehem Catholic Athletes of the year
• Michael McDaniel quieted BC doubters
• Kalista Walters worked hard to be the best
By Peter Car and Katie McDonald

LEHIGH VALLEY FOCUS
  Jerry Blavat, ‘The Geator,’ holds court in Bethlehem
He may not have been “America’s oldest teen-ager.” That would have been Dick Clark. He may not have been one of WAEB’s “Good Guys.” That would have included Gene Kaye whose “Notre Dame Bandstand” concerts brought pop stars of the day to the Lehigh Valley during the 1960s’ AM radio heyday. He is “The Geator With The Heator,” “The Big Boss With The Hot Sauce.” That would be Jerry Blavat, whose “The Discophonic Scene” (1965-’67), a teen dance show on Philadelphia’s WCAU-TV, had quite a following in the Lehigh and Delaware valleys.
By Paul Willistein


OTHER STORIES
Bethlehem Township: Board battles water issue
Bethelehem Township: Residents seek relief from invasion bamboo
Bethlehem: Ramadan
Bethlehem: Zoners approve new tech center
Bethlehem: Council approves zoned hauling program
Bethlehem: State mayors gather
Bethlehem: Head Start gets PNC grant
Lehigh Valley: Volunteer Center hosts networking event
Lehigh Valley: LANTA to discuss fare increase
Lehigh County: New security for domestic violence victims available
National: Sen. Casey seeks stronger campus safety
West Bethlehem: A yard sale tradition continues

WEEKLY FEATURES
Around town community calendar
Police logs
Area obituaries
Center for Animal Health and Welfare
Volunteers
Student profiles
High school news reports

The Bethlehem Press online
Where to buy the Bethlehem Press
To subscribe: New start
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Tuesday, July 21, 2015


July 22, 2015

COVER STORY
  Heroin addition: A growing epidemic – Part 2
In the late 1880s, the modification of natural substances in pharmacological sciences was important work. Pneumonia and tuberculosis were then the leading causes of death worldwide, and in an effort to alleviate the suffering of so many sick and wasting people, Germany’s Bayer Corporation introduced a fast-acting painkiller it called “heroin.”
   • Signs of addiction
   • Getting help locally
By Nate Jastrzemski, Chris Parker and Katya Krichak


SOUTH BETHLEHEM
  Lynn Avenue bridge closed
Lynn Avenue has been closed from Route 412 to Sixth Street as the South Bethlehem roadway undergoes surface renovation and related work by PennDOT. A detour for local vehicles has been posted in the area. According to the Bethlehem Department of Public Works, the city  is planning to demolish the antiquated and rusty bridge structure “likely, late this year.” The construction of a new and wider bridge is scheduled to start in the early spring of 2016. The completion of the bridge project and reopening of Lynn Avenue is expected to follow in the fall of the same year in time for the busy holiday season in the Christmas City, USA. The present 1925 truss bridge is listed on Bridgehunter.com as a “historical and notable bridge of the United States.”
By Tim Gilman


COMMUNITY
  Sally’s a ‘beacon of hope’
“Sally,” a 53 year-old pink firetruck dedicated to raising awareness of women’s health issues, was dedicated during a brief ceremony at SteelStacks recently. Though no longer making fire calls, this vehicle will now make home visits to women battling illness. Photo: State Rep. Marcia Hahn, cancer survivor Mae Trexler, daughter Linda Trexler and LV Pink Heals founder Bill Andress.
By Bernie O’Hare


PEOPLE
  Olympic teams earn medals
After their participation in the Big Sectional Games in May, three Bethlehem Special Olympics basketball teams were selected to compete in the Penn State University Special Olympics Summer Games in June. There, the Bethlehem participants earned five total medals: One of the three teams and one skills player earned gold medals and the other two teams and second skills player earned silver medals. The teams practiced each Monday night at Northeast Middle School from January until the beginning of the games. Members were coached by Emily Mulicka, Ryan Moll, Ami Bedics, Melissa Pedone, Austin


SCHOOL
  Bridges to the future
If you needed a cabinet built, or a health assessment, or a web page designed, the recent Bridges Foundation “Celebration of Excellence” was a good spot to be.
These are just a few of the many eclectic talents possessed by area high school students who received scholarship money from the foundation to continue their education.
By Alex Green

BETHLEHEM SPORTS
Freedom HS Athletes of the Year
Jake Young: Freedom’s Jack of All Trades
Helen Hsu: focused, goal-oriented, humble
By Peter Car and Katie McDonald

LEHIGH VALLEY FOCUS
Notre Dame summer theatre back with musical classic
For many, “Jekyll and Hyde” is a classic piece of literature and theater that transcends time and tells the gripping story of a rather torn man who struggles with his own identity. But for Rody Gilkeson, director of the Notre Dame Summer Theatre-Revelations Productions’ “Jekyll & Hyde: The Musical,” July 24 - Aug. 2, Notre Dame High School, Bethlehem Township, it also stands as an exciting opportunity.
By Luke Muench

OTHER STORIES
Bethlehem: Southside trash haulers ready to go
Bethlehem: It was his luck day at the library
Bethlehem Water Authority: Martin Tower zoning proposal decried
Bethlehem: ’22,000 acres, 115,000 people’
Lehigh Valley: Officers recognized for aggressive driving enforcement
South Bethlehem: 150th anniversary plans reviewed
Northampton County: Council tables name change
Fountain Hill: Council debates TV disposal
Fountain Hill: Council considers hiring bill collection agency
Bethlehem: 32nd annual block party

WEEKLY FEATURES
Around town community calendar
Police logs
Area obituaries
Center for Animal Health and Welfare
Volunteers
Student profiles
High school news reports

The Bethlehem Press online
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To subscribe: New start
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Tuesday, July 14, 2015


July 15, 2015


COVER STORY-PART 1
  Heroin addition: A growing epidemic
Heroin use is hitting an all-time high in the United States.
Between 2007 and 2012, the numbers of people using the drug each year rose from 373,000 to 669,000, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. In 2011, 4.2 million Americans aged 12 or older (or 1.6 percent) had used heroin at least once in their lives, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse.
By Chris Parker


NORTHAMPTON COUNTY
  Council approves pay raises
On April 16, Northampton County Council voted unanimously to approve across-the-board pay hikes, averaging 4.5 percent, for 228 county workers in 14 different clerical job titles. Deputy Administrator Cathy Allen told council it would cost about $307,000, and would be above and beyond whatever was being negotiated in union contracts. A human resources memo complained that “the county has struggled in recruiting and maintaining staff in many of the clerical positions t
Photo: After the meeting, Executive John Brown listened to Bob Werner (left), Scott Parsons (behind him) and magisterial employees who believe they are entitled to a 4.5 percent raise.
By Bernie O’Hare


COMMUNITY
  ‘Kind of like a family’
The 2015 Boutique Cancer fundraiser raised more than $230,000, which will be shared with local organizations which provide cancer treatment and support services.  The Cancer Support Community, St. Luke’s Cancer Center and St. Luke’s Hospice are those beneficiaries. At a volunteer luncheon following the late May sale held at the city’s municipal ice rink, volunteers learned the results of their efforts. More than 250 volunteers, set up, sorted, displayed, priced and assisted patrons, giving more than 10,760 hours of their time, the equivalent of 62 full-time employees. Representatives of each recipient organization lauded the efforts, citing the benefits derived from the Boutique’s support. Photo: Co-chairs Karen Hein, Jan Connell and Sharon Kunsman receives floral bouquets in gratitude for the countless hours they gave to the 2015 Boutique at the Rink.
By Dana Grubb


CLASSROOM
  ‘It’s a love form, not just a job’
When Bethlehem Area Vocational Technical School literacy coach Linda Moyer chose former White House Chef John Moeller’s book “Dining at the White House” to help bolster culinary arts students’ writing and reading skills, little could she have anticipated that Moeller himself would join the students for an in depth dinner preparation learning experience. Photo: Culinary students Thomas Benak Jr. and Kelly Von Steuben listen as Moeller explains how ingredients in the tomato, mustard and shallot dressing need to be chopped as finely as possible so that they “come together to make it more flavorful.”
By Dana Grubb

COMMENTARY
  Ed's World
By Ed Courrier

BETHLEHEM HISTORY
  Moulton, Rose Kleckner, photographers
Moulton A. Kleckner’s photographs of Bethlehem during the 1870s give us a glimpse of recreation in Bethlehem during in those years. His photographs reveal a peaceful community whose residents enjoyed fishing, boating, and men smoking pipes while appreciating beautiful vistas. Groups of tourists are shown reading the gravestones in the Moravian God’s Acre cemetery. The women in the photos wear hats and dresses with long skirts puffed out by layers of petticoats. The trees and lawns are neatly trimmed and the buildings and fences are well maintained.
By Karen M. Samuels

BETHLEHEM SPORTS
  Beachi and Freedom shine at Stellar
It would be fair to say that last weekend’s Stellar Basketball Tournament at Cedar Beach brought some surprises and two of Bethlehem’s teams were right in the middle of fortunate performances. Both Freedom and Bethlehem Catholic reached Sunday’s semifinal rounds to the surprise of many, including their own head coaches, to make a lasting impression in the summer’s marquee tournament.
By Pete Car

LEHIGH VALLEY FOCUS
  Alien vs. Native
There are several meanings that the word alien might trigger. Children might visualize creatures from outer space. Adults might think of someone crossing a border. I’m using the word to refer to alien critters and plants that are not native to a region. When you choose plantings, choose wisely and buy native plant species.
By Bud Cole

OTHER STORIES
Bethlehem: City zoners approve renovation variances
Bethlehem Township: Traditions suffers a minor setback in Green Pond plans
Lehigh Valley: Responses vary to proposed overtime changes
Fountain Hill/Hellertown: Local firefighters complete raining
Northampton County: Council approve pay raises

WEEKLY FEATURES
Around town community calendar
Police logs
Area obituaries
Center for Animal Health and Welfare
Volunteers
Student profiles
High school news reports

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