OUR 10TH YEAR OF SERVICE
TO THE CITY OF BETHLEHEM, BETHLEHEM AND HANOVER TOWNSHIPS AND THE BOROUGHS OF FOUNTAIN HILL, FREEMANSBURG AND HELLERTOWN

Phone: 610-625-2121 FAX: 610-625-2126 gtaylor@tnonline.com

Tuesday, November 29, 2016


November 30, 2016

COVER STORY

Welcome, welcome

The Christmas City’s tree lighting ceremony Nov. 25, at Payrow Plaza in Bethlehem’s City Center, marked the traditional start of the holiday season and was greeted by several thousand festive celebrants and the musicians participating in the family-friendly program. Mayor Bob Donchez and five third-graders from Marvine and Freemansburg elementary schools led the lighting of the 40-foot Christmas Tree. Photo: Former Bethlehem mayor Don Cunningham leads his band, Cunningham and Associates, welcoming the special guest, Santa Claus, with a lively version of “Santa Claus is Coming to Town” during the Christmas City tree lighting ceremony. More photos on page A4.

By Tim Gilman

 

ETHICS

‘Woven into the fabric of life’

We should work hard to make sure that government ethics is not an oxymoron,” quipped Dr. John Kincaid of Lafayette College’s Meyner Center,  moderator of “A Community Discussion on Ethics Ordinances for Bethlehem” Nov. 17 at Bethlehem City Hall’s Rotunda. The event was presented by the Northampton County League of Women Voters and South Side Initiative. Beverly Hernandez, president of the Northampton County LWV, and Kincaid moderated the “fireside chat” with a five-member panel. Hernandez invited audience members to submit questions on index cards. Photo: Text has been edited by another user. Click OK to perform WriteForth

By Ed Courrier

 

COMMUNITY

NCC, Archives to host ‘Women of Steel’ panel

The Steelworkers’ Archives is collaborating with Lehigh University on a Mellon Foundation funded digital archive project. The Women of Bethlehem Steel project aims to collect stories of women’s experiences as workers, wives, store owners, union officials, managers and clerical workers at Bethlehem Steel or in the surrounding neighborhoods. Northampton Community College will host an event Dec. 2 consisting of a slide show of women at the Steel, an explanation of the project by representatives from Lehigh University and the Steelworkers’ Archives, and a mediated panel of women affiliated with the Steel. Photo: Marlene Burkey worked at Bethlehem Plant from 1977 to1981. Photo was taken at Tool Steel Division in 1980.

By Nate Jastrzemski

 

LEHIGH CAMPUS

Standing with Standing Rock

An estimated 150-200 people answered a national call at Lehigh University late afternoon Nov. 15 to protest the Dakota Access Pipeline. The peaceful assembly at the flagpole on Memorial Drive was organized by Lehigh University Green Action and the Lehigh Black Student Union. LEPOCO, Black Lives Matter, and the Alliance for Sustainable Communities Lehigh Valley were also involved. Photo: David Casagrande, associate professor of anthropology at Lehigh University addresses the “#No DAPL” crowd.

By Ed Courrier

 

COMMUNITY

Getting ready for Luminaria Night

What do 95,000 votive candles, 95,000 bags and 22.4 tons of sand give you? Luminaria Night 2016, which is scheduled to take place Dec. 10 throughout the Bethlehem and Lehigh Valley areas. The sand has been donated by Quikrete and Lowe’s.

Volunteers, Liberty and Freedom high school students earning community service hours, and teens in Northampton County’s juvenile probation program have been working tirelessly to assemble luminaria kits at the Memorial Pool House in Bethlehem. The kits will be distributed Dec. 3, 5 and 6 to luminaria block captains and any walk-in customers who’d like to participate. Photo: Liberty HS’s Anthony Cortese, a senior, and Madison Muller, a sophomore, assemble luminaria kits for the 2016 initiative that benefits New Bethany Ministries. Students earn community service hours toward their graduation requirements.

By Dana Grubb

 

HELLERTOWN

Santa comes to town

Instead of relying on Rudolph’s red nose, Santa depended upon a brightly lit Dewey Fire Co. pumper to guide him into Hellertown and kick off the Christmas season
 Nov. 25.

By Bernie O’Hare

 

STEELSTACKS

‘Dream machines’ and more

The final Cars and Coffee event of 2016 was held Oct. 22, with hundreds of vehicles on display and thousands of people in attendance circulating throughout the SteelStacks environs in search of their favorite classic, vintage and collectible vehicles. Eleven DeLorean DMC-12 cars belonging to members of the Mid-Atlantic DeLorean Owners Club were featured. Vehicles were spread throughout several parking lots, PNC Plaza and Air Products Town Square. The event is sponsored by Chevy 21 and presented by ArtsQuest. Photo: Abe Amauri from Hoboken, N.J., snaps a photo of a car parked in front of the blast furnaces at SteelStacks. It was his first visit to Cars and Coffee. He said he came to see “all of the different cars, all the exotics and cars you don’t see often.”

By Dana Grubb

 

CLASSROOM

Lennon education bus visits Southside

He’ll be gone 36 years on Dec. 8, but today as then, John Lennon’s influence on music, the arts and young people continues as this past week when the John Lennon Educational Tour Bus visited the Lehigh Valley Charter HS for the Arts. “I received an email last summer,” said Charter Arts executive director and CEO Diane LaBelle, “that the Lennon Bus would be visiting schools and maybe they would come here. Three weeks ago we found out we were one of three finalists.” Photo: Six hundred students and Charter Arts staff form a peace symbol at the Levitt Pavilion to promote the Imagine Peace Sign Project.

By Dana Grubb

 
BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Becahi’s moving on!

It’s fair to say that Bethlehem Catholic will face perhaps the biggest challenge it has seen in over a decade when the Golden Hawks square off against Imhotep Charter this Friday night at 7 p.m. in the PIAA 4A semifinals at Northern Lehigh. It appears to be a David vs. Goliath task that Becahi (11-3) is walking into this weekend against Imhotep (12-0), as they carry the state’s top ranking and are returning state champions from last year.

By Peter Car

 

LV FOCUS

Migration knows no man-made boundaries

The Lehigh Valley region’s fall migration is just about finished. A few raptors, like the bald eagle, can still be seen gliding past Hawk Mountain observation points. In most cases, the birds that fly south from the area and the birds that fly south to our region for the winter have settled in. When I hear the word migration, I immediately think of the north and south movement of birds during spring and fall. But there are other animals that migrate. I combined several dictionary definitions of the verb migrate and came up with one of my own: The movement of most birds, as well as some fish and mammals, from one region or climate zone to another with the change in seasons.

By Bud Cole


OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: Proposed LVA charter school could save BASD $1M

Bethlehem Township: No tax increase, but sewer fee increases

Bethlehem Township: Center renovation manager chosen

Hanover Township: DevTech plastics to build storage units locally

Northampton County: Emergency team updates council

Northampton County: Vehicle registration could increase

Saucon Valley: Parents upset with school racism

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

To advertise: Ad staff

Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter







 

Tuesday, November 22, 2016


November 23, 2016

COVER STORY

Christmas season opens Friday


Students from Marvine and Freemansburg elementary schools were the guests of honor at the Mayor’s Christmas Tree decorating party Nov. 18 at Payrow Plaza. The third graders were treated to a variety of gifts and activities which included a visit by Santa and Mrs. Claus and music by 25 members of the Freedom HS Patriot Band. Volunteers from the Moravian College women’s soccer team, Cops ‘n’ Kids Children’s Literacy Program and the Bethlehem Police Department participated in the children’s event which also offered treats and lunch for the kids.
Photo: Bethlehem Police Captain Bill Dosedlo holds Savanah Spingre of Freemansburg ES so she can attach her decorated holiday ornament to the Mayor’s Christmas Tree at Payrow Plaza.

By Tim Gilman


BETHLEHEM

City taxes remain unchanged

Days after a nationwide election shocker, Mayor Bob Donchez eased some tensions among local business leaders at Moravian College Nov. 11 during his annual Lehigh Valley Chamber breakfast at Moravian College by delivering good news: His proposed 2017 budget is balanced and there will be no need for a tax increase. He also explained the city’s massive debt has been whittled down by many millions of dollars in the past few years. “Each year, we have quantified the value of our five-year cumulative deficit.  If you recall in 2014, we measured this five-year deficit as over $40MM.  We have made incremental progress each year.  I am pleased to report that, based on the proposed 2017 budget, the five-year deficit is now reduced to $12.8M.  This is great progress, but the challenges remain and it will demand our continued effort and creativity.”

By Nate Jastrzemski

 

COMMUNITY

‘A talented educational leader’

Bethlehem Area School District’s own Superintendent Dr. Joseph Roy Nov. 17 was recognized by the Pennsylvania Association of School Administrators as the 2017 Pennsylvania superintendent of the year. According to the PASA’s release, since his tenure began in August 2010, Roy established a “Roadmap to Educational Excellence” plan, introduced restorative practices to improve behavior in the high schools, implemented full-day kindergarten and continues to provide constant positive communication and community engagement.

By Nate Jastrzemski

 

COMMUNITY

Veterans remembered at several venues

Maj. Gen. Gerard Still, president of the Lehigh Valley Military Affairs Council, was the featured speaker for the 9th annual Veterans’ Remembrance Service on Veterans Day at the Cantelmi-Long Funeral Home in Bethlehem. The American Legion Post 379 honor guard participated in the outdoor event. State Representative Steve Samuelson presented certificates of honor to family members of local deceased veterans. Photo: Joe Herkaco of the American Legion Post 379 plays “Taps” at the conclusion of the Veterans’ Remembrance Service.

By Tim Gilman



The United Steelworkers Union and Lehigh Valley Chapter of Nam Knights teamed up on Veterans’ Day at the Third Street Armed Forces Memorial to pay tribute to those who served. In a ceremony attended by about 70 people, every veteran who was present was asked to come forward and identify himself. Each was provided with a carnation and a handwritten “Thank you” note written by a Broughal MS student. Photo: Members of the Nam Knights honor veterans with carnations and handwritten notes from students at Broughal MS.

By Bernie O’Hare



Northampton Community College and local officials welcomed members of the storied 65th Infantry Regiment Nov. 10 to celebrate its members’ exceptional service for Veterans Day. The regiment was the only Hispanic-segregated unit in U.S. Army history, and is now immortalized in a documentary honoring its historic actions in World War II and Korea. The name “Borinqueneers” is derived from the native name for the island of Puerto Rico. Photo: Veteran Borinqueneers, family members who accepted awards on the behalf of deceased members, friends, officials and Hispanic members of the Nam Knights wrap up the ceremony together at NCC’s Lipkin Theater.

By Nate Jastrzemski


The National Museum of Industrial History in South Bethlehem celebrated Veterans Day with guest speakers and exhibits honoring American veterans and the workers of Bethlehem Steel. An exhibit of the 75th anniversary of the “E” Flag and related items that recognized the production excellence of Bethlehem Steel during World War II was featured in the hallway entrance to the museum. Photo: Kitsa Behringer, education coordinator of the National Museum of Industrial History, helps museum visitors make souvenir paper Bethlehem Steel “E” pennants.

By Tim Gilman,

 

SOUTHSIDE

Ground broken for parking garage

Celebrating years of effort by standing in fresh dirt, officials gathered Friday on the Southside to announce the New Street car park is now on its way. The $15 million deck will provide 626 parking spaces for the typically congested neighboring streets and businesses and is due to open next summer. Said Mayor Bob Donchez, “This is a long time coming.” Photo: Lynn Collins-Cunningham joins Sen. Lisa Boscola, Mayor Bob Donchez and Parking Authority members to make their ceremonial dirt-toss.

By Nate Jastrzemski

 

BETHLEHEM
Engaging in circles

More than 300 people from 10 countries attended the three-day International Institute of Restorative Practices’ World Conference held in October at the Hotel Bethlehem and the IIRP’s graduate school campus on Main Street in Historic Bethlehem. Countries represented included Pakistan, Australia, the Netherlands, Singapore and Canada. Restorative practices is an emerging social science that studies ways to restore and develop social well-being and interaction through participatory learning and decision-making. The institute in Bethlehem is the world’s first graduate school devoted exclusively to teaching restorative practices. It offers a master of science degree and a graduate certificate locally and, with is partners, provides train-the-trainer programs worldwide. Photo: Conciliation specialists Mildred Duprey de Robles and Kim Milstead use group “circles” to foster dialogue and understanding in communities wracked with racial violencein their work with the DOJ’s Community Relations Service.

By Carole Gorney

 

HALLOWEEN

Fright Night in the city

Yoshi Tsugiyama hands out treats to Abigale Fotta in a peacock costume and Benjamin Zambrana as a banana. Jennifer Fotta of Bethlehem and Alicia Kozak of Allentown accompanied their children. Tsugiyama, a new Wall Street resident originally from Japan, said it was his first trick or treat night experience.

By Tim Gilman



‘Safe’ night’ at St. Mark’s

featured a “well-supervised” agenda organized by the church along Easton Avenue. Pumpkin decorating, hayrides, games, crafts, sweet treats and food are part of the free event for church members and guests from the community. Children are encouraged to wear Halloween costumes to the three-hour family-friendly event. Photo: Ava Coulter picks out a pumpkin after a hayride on the grounds of St. Marks’ Lutheran Church. Ava was with her father Chad Coulter of Bethlehem.

By Tim Gilman

 

LEHIGH VALLEY

Foundation celebrates 50th

The Lehigh Valley Community Foundation (LVCF) celebrated its 50th anniversary, by doing what it does best: Making grants to community organizations that work to improve the lives of those in the Lehigh Valley. Bernie Story, president and CEO of LVCF, welcomed the group of over 200 community members to the kick-off in the Fowler Blast Furnace Room at SteelStacks recently. Photo: Curtis “Hank” Barnette, a former governor of the Community Foundation, is joined by Bernie Story, far right, to present the Spark Grant Kick-off check to Lynn and Don Cunningham in support of Bethlehem’s 275th Anniversary Legacy gift.

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Hawks advance in state play-offs

There are plenty of things to be grateful for during the Thanksgiving holiday, but if you’re a local high school football program who’s still playing, a Thursday practice might be just as satisfying as a roasted turkey. Bethlehem Catholic coaches and players certainly acted that way following last week’s 51-20 victory over Pottsgrove in the opening round of the PIAA 4A quarterfinals at Northern Lehigh.

By Peter Car

 

LV FOCUS

Classical ice

Great images come to mind when you think of a “Symphony Orchestra on Ice.”I can see the tuba player skating along next to the piccolo player, and maybe the cellists sitting on chairs being pushed by the percussion section, but it got a little tricky when I tried to figure out how they would hold their music, skate and play their instruments all at the same time.

By Diane Wittry

 

OTHER STORIES

South Bethlehem: Casino expansion planned

Bethlehem: Atria community shows support

Bethlehem: Library book sale begins Nov. 30

Fountain Hill: No tax increase in 2017 budget

Freemanbsurg: Locktender’s house restoration under way

Lehigh County: Safe Schools meeting draws large crowd

State: Pa. coroner’s release over dose report

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

To advertise: Ad staff

Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter







 

Tuesday, November 15, 2016


November 16, 2016

COVER STORY

African Children’s Choir in town Nov. 19

In the 32 years since its inception, over 52,000 children from Uganda, Kenya, Rwanda, South Africa, Nigeria and Ghana have received financial support for their education through the African Children’s Choir. The choir’s main goal is to ensure that Africa’s children receive educations because its founders know that helping Africa’s most vulnerable children today will provide them with the skills to help Africa tomorrow. Photo: The African Children’s Choir has performed at major events and venues worldwide, including the British House of Commons, the Pentagon, Royal Albert Hall, the London Palladium, and the Palais des Beaux Arts. The Children’s African Choir is performing on Saturday at 7:15, at the First Presbyterian Church on Center Street in Bethlehem.

By Joanna Ireland

 

POST-ELECTION

Local officials comment on results

Following the most contentious and ugly U.S. election cycle in recent times, officials around the Lehigh Valley from both major parties are calling for unity above all else. Bethlehem Mayor Bob Donchez said he had suspected it would be a close election considering the candidates’ flaws. “I didn’t think Mr. Trump would crack the blue wall… I sensed talking with people that there was a quiet Trump vote. People just didn’t want to admit they were voting for him. But now that the election is over we really have to unite and support President Trump because that’s what makes democracy great.”

By Nate Jastrzemski and Bernie O’Hare

 

ANOTHER VIEW
ED’S WORLD

Graphic commentary by artist Ed Courrier

 

VETERANS DAY 2016

Miller Heights ES marks 16th ceremony

Miller Heights ES students and faculty presented their 16th annual Veterans Day program Nov. 10 honoring dozens of military veterans in attendance. Veterans from the five service branches attended and included 91--year-old U.S. Navy and World War II veteran Edward Crocus and 85-year-old U.S. Army and Korean Conflict veteran Richard Sloyer. Both are from the Bethlehem area. Photo: Miller Heights students and veterans in attendance recite the ‘Pledge of Allegiance.’

By Dana Grubb

 

VETERANS DAY 2016

Hanover students honor veterans

Hanover ES hosted a well-attended Veterans Day celebration Nov. 10.  Veterans and students participated in the seventh annual patriotic event, which started outside with a flag-raising and music by some of the students. The major part of the program honoring local veterans was held in a crowded all-purpose room. The hourlong event was spearheaded by Hanover Principal Timothy Lynch and a committee of teachers. Students’ families were a noticeable part of the audience, which enjoyed musical entertainment by their talented children. Photo: A Veterans Day greeting is spelled out by older students on stage.

By Tim Gilman

 

PEOPLE

Press editor honored

Bethlehem Press editor George Taylor was among 10 journalism educators honored with the Journalism Education Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award presented recently in Indianapolis. JEA, a nationwide organization of scholastic and collegiate journalism educators, gives this award to retirees for lifetime dedication to journalism education. Before starting to work for the Times News in Lehighton and eventually the Bethlehem Press, Taylor advised Tamaqua Area HS’s student newspaper, the Blue and White, for 15 years. That publication in a small coal-region school was often named among the top student publications in the nation. Many of his students won numerous state and national awards.

 

CLASSROOM

Charter Arts students take Halloween hike

The Charter HS for the Arts’ student body walked Third Street Oct. 28 in celebration of Halloween, and both kids and faculty were in costume. After their walk past downtown businesses they proceeded to the Levitt Pavilion, where there was music and judged costume contest. Above: Charter Arts Director Diane LaBelle leads students past neighboring Third Street businesses.

By Nate Jastrzemski

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Becahi beats Saucon Valley for district title

Bethlehem Catholic has dealt with adversity all football season, so it was fitting that the Hawks had another dose of it last Friday night in the District 11 4A champion ship against Saucon Valley. But just like they have responded all season long, the Hawks answered the call for a 27-21 victory at J. Birney Crum Stadium to give the program its 11th district championship in school history.

By Peter Car

 

L
V FOCUS

Roomful of Teeth at Foy Nov. 19

The Bach Choir of Bethlehem’s annual gala is usually a bevy of delights and the 2016 lineup is no different. This year’s performers, Roomful of Teeth, are captivating and authentic, bringing original compositions and their own brand of musical instruments: their voices.

Roomful of Teeth performs the Gala Concert at 4 p.m. Nov. 19, Foy Hall, Priscilla Payne Hurd Campus, Moravian College, Main and Church streets, Bethlehem. The Benefactor Cocktails, Dinner and Auction fundraiser is at 6 p.m. Nov. 19, Hotel Bethlehem, 437 Main St., Bethlehem.

By Ashley Strange

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: BASD saves $9M in energy costs over last 6 years

Bethlehem: Concert marks 275 years of Moravian music

South Bethlehem: Christkindlmarkt expands, offers many new artisans

 

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

To advertise: Ad staff

Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter







 

Thursday, November 10, 2016

UPDATE


The Barbershop Quartet, All in Good Time, will not be coming out to the Bethlehem YWCA on Monday 11/14 due to a member being very sick. The group hopes to reschedule the event for January.

Tuesday, November 8, 2016


November 9, 2016

COVER STORY

City hosts 95th Halloween Parade

Bethlehem’s 95th annual Halloween parade Oct. 30 attracted thousands of spectators and participants on a summer-like day. The six-division parade began assembling at 16th Avenue and proceeded east on Broad to Main Street’s reviewing stand. The parade committee awarded 25 cash prizes to the various participants in the procession, which concluded at the Christmas City Fairgrounds beneath the Hill-to-Hill Bridge. Photo: Melissa Scotto and Rose Dopsovic, pack leaders of Girl Scout Brownie Troop 8709 of Bethlehem, carry their parade banner during the Halloween parade. The Brownies had posters which said, “Girl Scouts can do it, I can do it.” The special theme paid off, as the Bethlehem Brownies won the first-place prize, $300, for scouting unit participants.

By Tim Gilman

 

COURTROOM

Atkins convicted in hit-and-run case

Following a four-day trial in a crowded Northampton County courtroom, Royce Atkins, 23, was convicted Nov. 3 in a hit-and-run accident that ended the life of 9-year-old Darious Condash, a fourth grade student at Sheckler ES in Catasaqua. Condash was killed by a car driven by Atkins on Schoenersville Road when he stopped to pick up a piece of candy while in the company of an older cousin and friend.

By Bernie O’Hare

 

ANOTHER VIEW

Hit-and-run verdict shows system still works

Following a four-day trial, a Northampton County jury found Royce Atkins, 23, guilty yesterday in a fatal hit-and-run that killed nine-year old Darius Condash. The accident itself occurred almost exactly one year ago when Condash, accompanied by an older friend and cousin, crossed busy Schoenersville Road – a five-lane highway – at night. But this case was about much more than the actual verdict. The question to me was whether money buys justice.  In this case, the answer is no.

By Bernie O’Hare

 

CLASSROOM

Fountain Hill students go to the polls

Students and staff at Fountain Hill ES went to the polls Nov. 4 to cast their ballots for the next president of the United States. The school gymnasium was festooned in red, white and blue, with fifth grade students acting as poll workers for their schoolmates. Students were given paper ballots on which to make their choice in the privacy of voting booths. That ballot was then scanned into an ESO by Shoup optical scanner like those used throughout the Commonwealth of Virginia. Voting was followed by a brief lesson on the voting machine by first grade teacher Nicole Erney, whose family owns ESO by Shoup. Photo: First grade teacher Nicole Erney asks Fountain Hill ES students if they’ve voted. Erney’s family has been involved in the election process for over 100 years. Students used the Optical Scan machine produced at ESO by Shoup, which is owned by Erney’s family and used throughout the Commonwealth of Virginia during elections.

By Dana Grubb

 


HELLERTOWN
Annual Spirit Parade

Hellertown’s annual Saucon Valley Spirit Parade Oct. 23 included a number of floats and area high school and middle school bands. The route took participants along Walnut, Main, Water and Rentzheimer streets, and Constitution Avenue. Photo: The Kilpatrick family’s Wizard of Oz entry in the parade consists of Natalie as the Good Witch Glinda, mother-in-law Paige Albert as the Wicked Witch and Joel as the Tin Man. The Kilpatrick children are Ellesyn as the Lion, Everlyn as Dorothy and Edge as the Scarecrow.

By Mark Reccek and Tim Gilman

 

ENTERTAIMNET

Local author, artist explore possible ‘Santa’s Day Jobs’

December, of course, is an extremely busy month for Santa Claus, but what does he do for the rest of the year? Hellertown author Larry Deibert has tried to answer that question in his first children’s book, “Santa’s Day Jobs,” which has just been released on Amazon.com.

The book is quite a departure for Deibert, whose previous books have been on topics as wide-ranging as vampires, time travel and Vietnam. The idea came to him a few months ago, he said, when he was delivering mail (his day job) at Lehigh Valley Hospital, and a little girl pointed at him and cried, “Santa!”

By Julie Swan

 

BETHLEHEM SPORTS

Bethlehem Catholic rebounds against Central Catholic

If second chances are the theme Bethlehem Catholic’s football team is going for, the Hawks have certainly put that analogy to the test as of late. Becahi (8-3) turned a deflating 48-14 defeat to Central Catholic (9-2) in the regular season finale into a catapult for last week’s vilifying 39-33 victory over the Vikings in the District 11 4A semifinals at J. Birney Crum Stadium.

By Peter Car

 

LV FOCUS

‘Seeing red’ in colors of fall

Each year as fall sets in, the northeast states become alive with the beautiful and radiant colors of the autumn season. You have to feel sorry for people living in many parts of the United States who do not experience the changing colors that we have in the Lehigh Valley region. The area’s varied tree species and large timber stands can certainly compete with a giant box of Crayolas. Timing of the peak changes in leaf colors varies with locale. Individuals who really love the changing foliage can spend weeks enjoying the colors. Start in Maine during September and slowly work your way south. If you plan your trip well you will be able to continually visit the most colorful areas. The Weather Channel gives daily reports showing color coded maps indicating the best areas to visit as the leaf colors peak.

By Bud Cole

 

OTHER STORIES

Bethlehem: Council merges Parks, Works, departments

Bethlehem: Food co-op seeks new property

Bethlehem: LWN host Nopv. 17 town hall on local government ethics

Lehigh County: 2017 budget includes $1.7M tax cut

Lehigh County: Commissioners review budget amendments

Northampton County: Updating Gracedale’s financial health

Northampton County: County, VA offer new discount ID cards

Saucon Valley: Board grants supt. new 3-year contract

 

WEEKLY FEATURES

Around town community calendar

Police logs

Area obituaries

Center for Animal Health and Welfare

Volunteers

Student profiles

High school news reports

 

MEET THE PRESS





The Bethlehem Press online

Where to buy the Bethlehem Press

To subscribe: New start

Send news to the Bethlehem Press

To advertise: Ad staff

Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter